#1
hey all,

so I don't know how to follow a metronome yet, still only got 1 USB dynamic mic. still saving up for a decent interface with phantom power. i play acoustic.

the problem is, i don't know which to record first, the vocals or my guitar? I tried recording my guitar first then the vocals, the timing is just off.

im just looking for some suggestions or opinions,

by the way, im using mixcraft 5 as my software.
#2
Guitar first. if you have drums, drums first. Play to the click track...just tap with your foot to find the tempo.
#3
I don't do much recording myself but I find it easier to do the instrumentals first and then go back and then do the vocals while listening to myself play on a head set. That way your singing in time to what your actually playing apposed to what your music notes say.
#4
Instruments first.

If you can't play to the metronome, then just practice to it. It's a pretty basic skill that every musician should have.
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#5
Personally, I always record in this order when creating a final version of something:
Drums
Bass
Rhythm guitars
Lead guitars
Vocals

It does vary slightly if I'm just recording a draft version of a work in progress, if that's the case I'll record whatever part I've written (usually rhythm guitar) against a plain drum beat so I can play around with all the other parts to check they fit, but once it's written the final version always gets done in that order.
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#6
Wow thanks guys! your comments were really helpful. Although i don't really know how to follow a metronome yet. Guess I'll just google it. Haha. or is there an easier way to do it? or a simpler way?
#7
You need to be able to follow a metronome. Practice a lot with one and you'll get used to it.

Drum loops are easier to follow than a metronome. It's kind of the cheating way, but it works.

If you still can't keep time with a drum loop you have big problems. Learn how to count and play in time before you try to record any full songs.
#10
Personally I always record the first instrument to start playing, if a song has a bass intro then I record the bass first. But once you've got groundwork laid, you can pull tracks off and rerecord them when you've got a better idea of what you're looking for
#11
Quote by theallspark12
Although i don't really know how to follow a metronome yet. Guess I'll just google it.

Essentially you set the metronome at the speed you want to play at, and then use it to keep your timing. easiest thing is to start with one note/cnord per click and have your pick attack (or pluck, strum, etc.) sound evenly with the click. then two notes per click, with the second half way between the two. start slowly and force yourself to be even. expand to more notes per click and patterns. then you match your picking/strumming pattern to where it needs to be on the clicks or between them. once you start doing it, it makes sense.

then you can worry about recording. because if you cant play in time, it is very, very hard to have more than one track.
#12
Quote by jof1029
Essentially you set the metronome at the speed you want to play at, and then use it to keep your timing. easiest thing is to start with one note/cnord per click and have your pick attack (or pluck, strum, etc.) sound evenly with the click. then two notes per click, with the second half way between the two. start slowly and force yourself to be even. expand to more notes per click and patterns. then you match your picking/strumming pattern to where it needs to be on the clicks or between them. once you start doing it, it makes sense.

then you can worry about recording. because if you cant play in time, it is very, very hard to have more than one track.


thanks a lot!


btw, i mainly play acoustic (acoustic guitar and just a beatbox/cajun, kinda like boyce avenue in their covers, just not with a piano) sooo if that changes anything, or if you could give me more tips, I would greatly appreciate it... and my mic is just a samson Q1U dynamic mic.
#13
Don't start with the metronome too slow, as practicing to a really slow metronome can be unhelpful as it's hard to find a regular pulse. 60-70 bpm is probably a good staring point if you want to get used to playing to a metronome before going in to a recording.
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