#1
Alright, so, I got an Ibanez RG 550 last week from the local guitar store. The dude set it up for me with a set of Hybrid Slinky 42 - 9 and got it tuned to Drop D like I asked. He then showed me everything I should need to do in case of the Floyd being too high, too low, etc.

Well, last night I broke my high e (the 9) and put on my only replacement, which is a 10. Now, when I tune it, the high e will not stay at e. It slowly brings itself out of tune and I don't know how to fix this. I don't have the money to buy new strings every week (plus, it's a 20-mile drive out to the music store.)

Is there anything I could do to fix this? Or do I need to get a 9 and things should be fine?

Thanks for any info and help.

-Syx
#3
Doesn't it have a locking bolt on the neck?



If not you got some serious issues, also tuning a floyd rose is a nightmare. I hope you like to adjust the springs in the back.... a lot.
#4
Yes, it's got the locking bolts on the neck. And I spent about an hour with the springs last night trying to fix it.

Ok, so.. Get a 9. I have a set of Power Slinky 42 - 9, so would I have to adjust the springs?


... Also, I've been told you're supposed to re-string one string at a time. My whole 'career' I've done all the strings at once. What difference is there?
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
#5
Quote by asixex
Yes, it's got the locking bolts on the neck. And I spent about an hour with the springs last night trying to fix it.

Ok, so.. Get a 9. I have a set of Power Slinky 42 - 9, so would I have to adjust the springs?


... Also, I've been told you're supposed to re-string one string at a time. My whole 'career' I've done all the strings at once. What difference is there?


Well unless you have something under the bridge to keep it from pulling down, if you do one string at a time the string will break probably depending on how tune the other strings are, which string it is, and how hard the bridge is pulling on it.

It is also recommended you have something under the bridge to keep it from pulling down while tuning so you can get it in standard, then look at your bridge after you take said thing out and see if it's slanted too up down or if it's parallel. You want it parallel which means you adjust the springs how much you think they have to be to get it parallel and do the whole thing all over again.

Make sure you lock the strings (like if you tune the highest or lowest two) right after tuning or else they'll easily go out of tune.
#6
I use my license to keep the bridge from dropping and breaking the strings.

Also, I know it's supposed to be parallel.

I don't lock the strings right after. I make sure every string is in tune before I lock down the bolts on the neck. I used to have a Jackson Warrior WRXT with a Floyd and I couldn't get it to stay in tune because I tightened the bolts after every pair of strings.

Ok, so, just to make sure... Stick with a gauge, make sure the string is the same gauge if you replace it, and when stringing, do it one at a time.

Thanks for the help.
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
#7
Sticking to one gauge (and brand!) is the easiest, yes, if you don't mind adjusting the springs.
#8
I've done a lot of string changes on Floyds. I haven't noticed a great deal of problem with changing brands but gauges definitely call for a complete reconfiguration of the spring balance. One string at a time keeps you from breaking strings and it's easier to get it back up to proper tuning as well. There is a guide in the tech section at http://www.ibanezrules.com/tech/setup/tuning.htm that goes into a lot of detail on tuning a Floyd style bridge. You basically need to tune the heavier strings way above where they need to be in a graduated pattern. By the time to reach the high E string the other strings will have lost enough tension to put them very close to their final tuning.
#9
Compensated tuning is great, if you're experience with floating bridges in general and your own in particular; Every bridge responds differently. I wouldn't recommend it to a novice, because it requires that you understand the basics of how tuning a FB works.

TS, don't forget the amazing floating bridge thread here on UG if you need more info, it's linked in my signature. You'll find all sorts of answers and tuning tricks in there, even to questions you didn't even know you had yet.
#10
@poppameth
That link is very insightful.

@Y00p
I'll be sure to check out that link after I look at poppa's. Also, what the hell is compensated tuning?
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
#11
Quote by asixex
@poppameth
That link is very insightful.

@Y00p
I'll be sure to check out that link after I look at poppa's. Also, what the hell is compensated tuning?

Tune up your E, then your A. Your E will have shifted (-> is now lower in pitch), because it's tension is lower than what it was before. Knowing this, we can tune your E sharp, then tune your A, (hopefully) taking your E close to perfect. If you apply this to all strings gradually (E really sharp; A a bit less sharp; D even less; etc), you can quickly get into perfect tuning.

This is where experience comes in, both of floating bridges in general and yours in particular; If you keep using the same brand* and gauge of string for a long period of time, you will know exactly how much sharper you want to tune all of your strings. You'll be on or near perfect tuning each time, in no time.

I don't know if 'compensated tuning' is the actual term, but it's how I usually call it; It just stuck.

*What I said about keeping the same brand of strings... Brands shouldn't vary in tension too much (provided you're using the same gauge), but they do. Usually the variation is subtle enough to not make a difference, but don't be surprised if you need to make some changes after changing brands.
#12
Alright, well.. I replaced the strings. The tail of the bridge is way too high, but I can't get it down. And at any rate, the high e is STILL coming out of tuning.

Also, what difference does it make if the bridge is parallel, too high, or too recessed? Can it hurt the bridge?
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
#13
I bet it could probably, theoretically, hurt the bridge... But the biggest problems are in general playing-comfort; Intonation, action and of course tuning stability will probably all suffer.

Check out the threads pointed out earlier to see how to fix this problem.

Hint: It has to do with the springs in the back.
#14
I know it has to do with the springs. I ****ed with them as best as I could until I couldn't do it anymore.

I know that as you tighten the springs, the tail drops. As you loosen them, the tail rises. The opposite is true for the strings; if you loosen the strings, the tail drops and if you tighten them, the tail rises.

Knowing what I just said, I did my damndest to fix the bridge to where it should be. But it just doesn't work for me.
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
#15
Oh! Well, that's weird.

Describe exactly what you are doing; I can't imagine it failing in any way...
#16
I tuned the strings one half step lower than I wanted (C# G# C# F# A# D#/ Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb) and the tail was still raised so I tightened the springs. This brought the tail down to parallel, but the strings were now a half step HIGHER than I wanted. So, I just loosened the springs until the tuning was right and I'm not bothering with it right now. I know I'd get pissed off and break it.

I'm gonna try to get it right again here in about 10 minutes.

EDIT: I followed the guide here: http://www.glowingtubes.com/p/FloydTuning.htm
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
Last edited by asixex at Jan 8, 2012,
#17
I see...

As I said, read the threads; Your concept of how the springs and strings work together aren't correct... If your bridge is parallel, but your strings are sharp, this means there's too much tension on your strings. You need to adjust both of these in respect to each other; You can't 'lock' one in and then change accordingly...
#18
It's also possible that depending on the string gauge you are using you can have too many, not enough, or the wrong stiffness/length springs to balance out. I recently installed a Wilkenson on an old Ibanez RX170 and played hell with the correct springs to tension it properly with Di'adderio 9s on it. I finally ended up with two stiff regular length springs in it in a V formation to get the correct balance. Something as simple as moving them to a straight formation would throw it out bad enough that I could never get it to balance. Floating trems are a bitch but it's something you have to get use to in order to benefit from what they can do.
Last edited by poppameth at Jan 8, 2012,
#19
Well I'm not going to start taking springs out and re-adjusting them to test out theories. I'll take it to the music store, have the guy set it up for me again and just stick with Hybrid Slinky 9's.

Edit:
****in' A! Got the bridge EXACTLY parallel with the body and everything is perfectly tuned.

I followed this video for stringing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_nOYkRed3I
And I followed this for springs: http://www.glowingtubes.com/p/FloydTuning.htm##setup

Tuned to Drop D, Parallel bridge, no more high E coming out of tune.. It's time to rock with some A7X.
This post brought to you thoughtfully by Syx
.show_Gear://
.load_guitar: Jackson_Rhoads.24_frets
.load_amp: Crate_G40C
.load_pedals: Digitech_distortionfactory_7 ; Dunlop_original_crybaby
.load_mic: Shure_PG58
Last edited by asixex at Jan 8, 2012,