#1
Please can anyone tell me the theory behind that?

Here's an example of this popular pop song (Katy Perry - Thinking of you)

The key of the song is E major

Here's E major chord scale : E - F#m - G#m - A - B - C#m - D#dim

The chord progression of the song is: E - F#m - A - B

Obviously the E major chord progression does not include an Aminor chord... but it fits perfectly here ..

E
Cause when I'm with him
F#m
I am thinking of you
A
Thinking of you
B
What you would do if
E
You were the one
F#m
Who was spending the night
A
Oh I wish that I
Am
Was looking into your eyes


In case you don't know the song .. here's the youtube link..
Katy Perry - Thinking of You

Thank you very much
#2
I would say it's just borrowing a chord from the parallel scale. Thats is e minor
#3
yeah i thought of that but .. is there some kind of theory behind that "borrowing a chord from the parallel scale" ?? I would love to learn more about it and why not .. use that "change" in my own songs.. If there's no theory then should i just trust my ears .. if it sounds good i keep it but if it sounds weird you just dont do it .. ?
#4
Well, I don't know much, but here's what I got.

C# minor is the relative minor to E major, and when you play in C# harmonic minor, your raised leading tone is a C natural. So when you go A, Am, E, it's almost like a chromatic suspension.
#5
It's called modal interchange, which is the name for borrowing chords from a parallel scale (most often a parallel minor scale or mode). In this case they are borrowing the IV- found in the parallel natural minor (as well as harmonic minor, and some other places).

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#6
Quote by NotSoAirJordan
Well, I don't know much, but here's what I got.

C# minor is the relative minor to E major, and when you play in C# harmonic minor, your raised leading tone is a C natural.

The leading tone would be B#.
So when you go A, Am, E, it's almost like a chromatic suspension.

Yep. TS, look at how the notes move in the harmony of those last 3 chords.

C# - C - B

Her melody note is also F#, which works nice on an Am chord in this context, and is also in the Key of E Major.
#7
Interesting, Katy Perry's songs have a whole heap of theory quirks if you look into them. The most impressive one to me is Last Friday Night, which is in the key of a chord which isn't played in the progression.

Otherwise I'm with the above, it's a borrowed chord from the parallel minor. From an improvising approach I'd go E major over all, and E minor over the A minor chord.
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#8
Quote by mdc


Her melody note is also F#, which works nice on an Am chord in this context, and is also in the Key of E Major.


Correct, which gives an overall minor 7th harmony.

Best,

Sean

PS to all: Listen to mdc when he talks, he's come a long way and knows his stuff very well. I rarely find a single thing to dispute when he posts.
#9
Quote by Sean0913
Correct, which gives an overall minor 7th harmony.

Best,

Sean

PS to all: Listen to mdc when he talks, he's come a long way and knows his stuff very well. I rarely find a single thing to dispute when he posts.

#10
Quote by AlanHB
Interesting, Katy Perry's songs have a whole heap of theory quirks if you look into them. The most impressive one to me is Last Friday Night, which is in the key of a chord which isn't played in the progression.

Otherwise I'm with the above, it's a borrowed chord from the parallel minor. From an improvising approach I'd go E major over all, and E minor over the A minor chord.



The song is one giant bridge

Anyway, dance (infused) songs are often static changes.

People dance to it, and so I say not going "home" to the Root chord is parallel to what it want s to achieve.

Continuous energy (tension) that forces you naturally to listen/dance to it, eagerly awaiting for an answer.

I got a book on the psychology of music, quite interesting to read though very difficult

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#11
That's a good point xdarrenx -

Churches do that a lot as well, I've taught many in modern worship how to extending out a song (say during an altar call) by continually going IV to V and leaving it wide open, until ready to make a resolution with either the IV to I or the V to the I.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by AlanHB
Interesting, Katy Perry's songs have a whole heap of theory quirks if you look into them. The most impressive one to me is Last Friday Night, which is in the key of a chord which isn't played in the progression.


I'm definately hearing the tonic minor in there. IV-iii-vi-ii. Wouldn't call it a "theory quirk"...

Continuous energy (tension) that forces you naturally to listen/dance to it, eagerly awaiting for an answer.


very interesting effect indeed! It's not that the tonic is never played though, it's that the song never fully resolves. You often get V or III at the end of each measure just pointing back to the IV.

Correct, which gives an overall minor 7th harmony.


I think you mean minor 6th?

Been thinking about this thread for a day now. When I hear any combination of notes from the tritone sub of the dominant resolving to a major tonic, I would attribute the pleasant tension-release effect to that rather than any modal interchange, parallel scale borrowing, or what have you. You can tell based on how other such notes affect the sound of the chord.