#1
Ok so I have a Dunlop wah, a Maxon od and I just bought a Boss noise suppressor today, and before I had the Boss i had the wah and maxon in front of the amp, not in the effects loop, so it went guitar -> Maxon -> Wah -> Mesa Dual Recto Mini. The amp is noisy and I play close to it so I needed to get a noise suppressor. I tried to hook it up a few different ways and nothing. please help!

how do I hook this up?
"It's not about who has the biggest stick, it's about how hard you can swing it"
Last edited by M_16A at Jan 9, 2012,
#2
Definitely put the noise suppressor in the effects loop. As for the wah and stuff, I don't have much experience with that stuff cause i always plug straight in without an effects loop.
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#3
Quote by jjbarnes
Definitely put the noise suppressor in the effects loop. As for the wah and stuff, I don't have much experience with that stuff cause i always plug straight in without an effects loop.


That's what I'm saying, I am an effects loop noob
"It's not about who has the biggest stick, it's about how hard you can swing it"
#4
You might also check the cables. You've added a new pedal, so now you have 2 patch cables. The power sources can also add a lot of hum to your pedals. You could give a try to more expensive cables, like the Perfectly Structured from Ibanez, for the patch cables, and the Elixir for the guitar to the pedals and the pedals ti the amp.
Anyway, moving the noise supressor into the loop will diminish the noise. If you want to get rid of it completely... that's another story, when using a domestic plug and playing into an RFI environment, like a home room. Your Mesa will amplify anything that comes from your guitar, and pickups are mere radio aerials! I've spend half of year trying to get a noise-free sound at home! It costed me more than the amp plus pedals.
#5
Well I did buy some two quality patch cables when I bought the pedal, so hopefully it's not those. It's not really any hum or static that is getting me it's just a wicked like feed back(?) when I stop playing and I don't roll off the volume knob all the way down. So how would I hook this all up?
"It's not about who has the biggest stick, it's about how hard you can swing it"
Last edited by M_16A at Jan 9, 2012,
#6
wah should come first, next are your overdrives, distortion, then mods (chorus, flanger, phaser etc), then delays, lastly noise gate.
#7
Quote by fusionfreak
wah should come first, next are your overdrives, distortion, then mods (chorus, flanger, phaser etc), then delays, lastly noise gate.


all in front of the amp?

and Imight have had it right before, but I'm pretty sure after looking up some videos of it, that i was given a broken pedal =( it wont turn off and even when i just had the noise suppressor in my chain (guitar - ns-2 - amp) i wouldn't get any sound, then when i took it out and put my od pedal in it worked fine. I'm taking it back today to (hopefully) get a new one then we'll see!
"It's not about who has the biggest stick, it's about how hard you can swing it"
Last edited by M_16A at Jan 10, 2012,
#8
With the Boss NS-2, you can actually run your Noise Suppressor through BOTH your "pre-loop" (between the guitar and amp) and your effects loop. Note the extra send/return jacks on the pedal.

So you could do...

Guitar>OD>Wah>NS2 input/output>Amp

THEN

FX Send>NS2 return/send>FX Return


...to patch it into both.


To get rid of that hissing feedback, it's absolutely necessary to put your NS-2 in the effects loop; high gain amps are notorious for this. Whether or not you want to run your NS-2 in your pre-loop as well is up to you. I use an ISP G-String Noise Reducer in both loops and have had great results.
#9
so could/should I put it just the ns-2 in the fx loop and the rest in the pre-loop? or would it be best to put it in both?
"It's not about who has the biggest stick, it's about how hard you can swing it"
#10
do the x-pattern thing with it. it's on google if you image google it.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#11
cant find the link for this.

Guitar Effect Pedals - Managing the Chain Gang
Filed under: Guitar, How-To by Nick Nitro on September 12, 2006

Rick Hamel of SiB Effects Pedals
Most every guitarist employs at least one effect pedal in his or her tonal arsenal, be it a $30 beater or a high-end “boutique” stomp-box. And, much like all things guitar, effects can be addictive. Many of us start with one and end up with a chain of effects we simply can’t live without. And just like every component in your signal path — from your pick to your speaker cone — effects affect your tone.
If you arrange them correctly, your effects pedals can be a transparent ally in your quest for good tone. In order to figure out what works best for you, it’s helpful to learn what each pedal in your chain does to your signal.
First, a disclaimer: we all know guitar tone is subjective. What sounds heavenly to me may not do it for you. My advice is based on my many years of experience and my personal sonic preferences. You may not agree with everything I suggest, but I know that if you try some of my suggestions, my experience tells me you will have good results.
Much of the strategy behind effects pedal arrangement has to do with the sound you are going for. Are you seeking out vintage Fender tweed tube amp raunch? Or big, classic British Marshall or Vox? Maybe that dramatic, processed 1980s sound? Clean jazz tone? What you are hoping to achieve has a lot to do with how you arrange your effects pedals. The following is an overview of some of the most common pedals, their characteristics and signal path preferences. Take a look and see if there aren’t some ideas in here for you to clean up your guitar signal and enhance your tone, regardless of what style you play.
Auto filters and other envelope devices love to be first in the signal path. These are dynamic units that require an unprocessed signal at their input to operate properly. They work best patched directly to your guitar. It just so happens that they also sound great when placed first in your effects chain.
Wah-wah pedals are band-pass filters that boost a narrow band of frequencies, allowing you to sweep them up and down the frequency spectrum. For a wide sweeping, natural sound, your wah should be next in you chain (after your auto filter or envelope device), and before any overdrive, distortion, delay or modulation effect. This arrangement also yields more of a vintage tone as well. However, if you are going for a more mechanical sounding wah, place it after your distortion or overdrive effect. Another interesting tone is to have a mild overdrive in front of your wah and distortion after it, which will allow you to experience elements of both tones.
Compressor-limiters have a couple of uses; as a sustainer they amplify weak signals and attenuate strong signals, thereby increasing your guitar’s sustain. As a limiter, they limit the amount of signal entering your amp or subsequent effect, helping to avoid distortion. A combination of both features – sustain without distortion — can be achieved with the right control settings. Compressor-limiters can also be used as simple boosts. These devices do their best work early in the signal path — before distortion, modulation effects, delays and reverbs, as they are best utilized after all dynamically-sensitive units.
Distortion and overdrive units are the cornerstones of many players’ tone. These effects sound best early in the signal path, before most modulation effects, delays, or reverbs. Placing them early in your effects chain will also cut down on unwanted noise, as it will amplify any and all noise generated by a previous device. Distortion and overdrive pedals placed late in the chain may take that tiny bit of hiss from your delay pedal or reverb unit and turn it into a wall of white noise, and your echo and reverb effects will be hard to tame as well. Another way to use a distortion or overdrive unit is to plug into the high gain channel of your amplifier rather than an external pedal, and treat the effects loop send of the amp (if so equipped) as your distortion effect output.
Volume pedals are great after distortion or overdrive units because you can increase and decrease your volume without altering grind level, just like the master volume in your amp (ummm, well…allegedly! I’ve yet to find a truly 100% useful master volume. Ed.). They’re also very useful to have before any reverb and/or delay units, allowing you to create volume swells without cutting off reverb or echo trails. Quite a few players gravitate toward putting volume pedals first in the chain, which is somewhat wasteful, as the volume control on your guitar serves the very same function. But it is useful to have your volume pedal first if you want a hands free, pre-distortion volume control. However, auto filters and envelope devices should not have a volume pedal before them in the signal chain, as they prefer a signal as raw as possible to do their job correctly.

"hope this helps."