#2
And in many ways proves my point in that thread I made a while back, most people in the business are lazy and you aren't going to get anywhere unless you do the work yourself. I really feel like a lot of bands today, especially younger ones, have this fallacy that just because they're a band they automatically expect that their going to be successful and things are just going to fall into place and everything will be handed to them. If anything, it's the other way around.

It's going to take work, a lot of work. It's going to take the 20 tours mentioned at holes in the wall before someone might notice you.

Best advice he said was, "do the work yourself".

People in the industry want marketability, knowing that you can handle doing tour after tour, knowing you can pump out albums or Ep's twice a year with fresh material, knowing you can go into a venue and put the audience in the palm of your hand.

And if you can't, as mentioned, there's a thousand other bands that are trying just as hard.
#3
Quote by scguitarking927
I really feel like a lot of bands today, especially younger ones, have this fallacy that just because they're a band they automatically expect that their going to be successful and things are just going to fall into place and everything will be handed to them.


Dude, it's always been like that.
#4
^ Truth.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
I actually think that the hard work part about trying to make your band successful would be fun; I look forward to that happening to me when I'm older. Even if it doesn't greatly pay off, my dream is being in a band gigging around a big city, enjoying it for the fact that I'm able to do it.

I'm excited for college where I can learn all of my music industry stuff so I can handle things myself better than I would if I didn't go to college for it.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#6
Quote by thePTOD
I actually think that the hard work part about trying to make your band successful would be fun; I look forward to that happening to me when I'm older. Even if it doesn't greatly pay off, my dream is being in a band gigging around a big city, enjoying it for the fact that I'm able to do it.

I'm excited for college where I can learn all of my music industry stuff so I can handle things myself better than I would if I didn't go to college for it.


It depends what you mean by "successful". If you're talking about a local following, yes you can wait until you're older. However I note that your profile states that you're 17, turning 18 in a couple of months.

Just to put this in perspective, different artists at the age of 17:

Taylor Swift released her debut album, which went multi-platinum.

Justin Bieber turned 17 last year. Had a world tour, movie, played Madison Square Garden.

Pink had a record deal with LA Reid as part of a girl group.

Usher had released an album one year earlier, which peaked at No 25 on the US Charts.

Katy Perry was signed to the Island Def Jam Music Group.


You can see where this is going. The "big artists" right now, they're not that much older than you, and they're younger than me, and I'm not that old (well I don't like to think so - 28). If you really want to make it big, I'd just get out there and start trying now, no course is going to guarantee your success/skill in "making it".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
^ Wisdom, represent!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Dude, it's always been like that.


It's just so annoying talking to some of these bands I'll work with and I'll ask some simple questions; what are your guy's goals, do have a tour planned, what's your marketing strategy, etc. (And I'm generally interested, I'm fascinated by marketing and different strategies, I just love it ) and they're just staring at me blank faced...

It's like, i just recorded your EP, I did some promo photography shots, design a cd cover, and give you a lead on finding cheap merch and some contacts for some venues...you just spent all this money and you have no ****ing clue on what to do lol. Money well spent. And they do all this when they're only playing once a month at a local rock bar...it's like wft?!

I need to get into management
#9
Quote by scguitarking927
I need to get into management


I recently recorded an EP with a band just to get a good recording and something I can hold on to. We've agreed the band probably won't last, but if you're willing to spend some serious cash recording your wedding day, I don't see the problem in perhaps creating a memento of band past

But I do get what you mean, just because an EP sounds and looks cool doesn't mean that it's going to sell itself.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud