#1
There are a few things I want to improve with my technique. One being my downpicking speed and another is the strength and coordination of my pinky. I developed a timed exercise that i want to do everyday that I am hoping will help with my speed. I have 3 parts in the exercise, one being straight downpicking 8th notes, then a simple 1-2-3-4 scale up and down the neck at 8th notes, then alternate picking at 16th notes.

Scale - 0:30
Downpicking - 0:30
Alternate - 0:30
Scale - 1:00
Down - 1:00
Alternate - 1:00
Scale - 1:00
Down - 1:30
Alternate 1:30
Scale - 1:00
Down - 2:00
Alternate 2:00

I will then go back down the list.

For the first day, I set the tempo at the maximum downpicking speed I could keep up for 2 min, which was 170 and kept that for the whole exercise. The speed for the scale was a little slow but as I progress it will get better.

Is this a good way to improve my techniques? On the downpicking sessions, my arm gets extremely tired and I am forcing my hand to keep up with the tempo, which I assume is good. As it gets easier, I will slowly increase the tempo.
#2
I think it's good exercise, you really have to be careful to be relaxed up (especially for downpicking). 30 sec is not bad, but 2 minutes it must be really tiring for the muscles (especially at high tempo) ...^^
#3
Quote by Syndromed
I think it's good exercise, you really have to be careful to be relaxed up (especially for downpicking). 30 sec is not bad, but 2 minutes it must be really tiring for the muscles (especially at high tempo) ...^^


Indeed, but as with everything you practise, it's all about staying relaxed and clean. Also, if you want some downpicking stamina, play anything by any of the '80s thrash metal bands.
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#4
Surely the best thing you can do to work on multiple techniques is to learn songs featuring as many of them as possible. After all, you're learning and practicing the techniques so that you can play songs which feature them - otherwise all you're doing is practicing exercises so that you can practice exercises featuring more exercises.

If you learn songs featuring them, not only will you practice the techniques in an applicable context with some actual musicality going on, you'll also have something fun to play and nice to hear. By all means, practice individual techniques separately, but the best way to practice them all together is to practice them in the context of an actual piece of music.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
#5
It is a little back to the debate "can we learn the guitar by learning songs."

I think he should just do both, learn a song with a mixture of technical parts and next do technical exercises like the one he presented...it's just my opinion ...