#1
So here's the thing, I've always been more of a tab/blues/ear guy, and then I got involved in this jazz group, and it's hard for me because I have to learn to read high level sheet music. and play chords I've never heard of (eg. F#+7b9, D#9#11 etc...) And at very high speeds, with little time to think about what im doing, is there a system or something to figure out all this advanced theory in a short period of time? Or some way of altering easy major/barre chords in a simple way to make these ridiculous chords? Like taking an A major barre chord at the fifth fret and removing one finger to make it a 7th? or adding one to make it a 6th? or removing 2 fingers to make it a 6/9#11th ? I'm just frustrated and there is so much to learn that really, I should know already. So any sort of tips, links to helpful lessons would be much appreciated.

Cheers.
If you give a man a fuzz, he will fuzz for a day; if you teach a man to fuzz, he will fuzz for his lifetime...
#2
I don't know about doing it in a short period of time, but here's what you want to do -

Get familiar with the sounds of these chords - your ears are still your #1 asset, great jazz musicians don't have to think about the chords any more than you do.

Learn the notes on the fretboard - you have to do this.

Learn how intervals work - basically this is the distance between two notes. Here's how to find them on the fretboard - http://www.discoverguitaronline.com/diagrams/view/9

Finally, what you do to get chords is build them up from a root note. A major chord has a root, major third, and perfect fifth in it. Any note can be doubled as long as all are present.

eg, E major chord

E||--0----|| root
B||--0----|| 5th
G||--1----|| 3rd
D||--2----|| root
A||--2----|| 5th
E||--0----|| root

With me so far?
#3
Also, a lot of jazz players in full bands can skip a couple of the notes in the chords if the rest of the band plays the rest of the chord. Like, the bass player plays the root note so you don't have to, and so on. Probably bad advice, but you know.
#4
Quote by Boz0r
Also, a lot of jazz players in full bands can skip a couple of the notes in the chords if the rest of the band plays the rest of the chord. Like, the bass player plays the root note so you don't have to, and so on. Probably bad advice, but you know.


No not bad, but typically you want to play the full chord being all the insturments are in different frequency ranges. It's easy for people to only hear certain things over other, and with an untrained ear people generally hear what you play and don't like it because it's not full even though the band is playing it, they just focus their ear on you.

In the long run you can do what Boz0r has suggested, but playing the whole thing will also help you technically wise. You'll gain speed and dexerity. Plus if this Jazz band picked you up knowing where your weak points are, they shouldn't mind as long as you are showing the effort of improving those and growing as a musician. Just practice, study, and absorb your material. Btw whenever there is a improvised spot and it's your turn, don't be flashy, play it to fit the harmony. Jazz musicians tend to hate flashy "Shredders" (Even though it's not really.). Think of Jazz like to blues in soloing terms, except focus on the chord tones and not pentatonic, with the key changes it won't even sound good.

"Who plays the Blues like Machine Gun Kelly, 500 notes to the bar?"

Cheers,
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#5
Fair enough. Just gotta keep up with the long hours of theory studying and memorizing till I can keep up with the vets I guess eh? =P Fair enough I suppose, no shortcuts, but we're in it for the love right? Lol

Thanks guys,Cheers!
If you give a man a fuzz, he will fuzz for a day; if you teach a man to fuzz, he will fuzz for his lifetime...
#6
As someone who is also learning theory I find it useful to write everything down in notebooks. Even if you don't look at them, simple things like writing the notes on the neck will help you memorize.
#8
Quote by Freepower
I don't know about doing it in a short period of time, but here's what you want to do -

Get familiar with the sounds of these chords - your ears are still your #1 asset, great jazz musicians don't have to think about the chords any more than you do.

Learn the notes on the fretboard - you have to do this.

Learn how intervals work - basically this is the distance between two notes. Here's how to find them on the fretboard - http://www.discoverguitaronline.com/diagrams/view/9

Finally, what you do to get chords is build them up from a root note. A major chord has a root, major third, and perfect fifth in it. Any note can be doubled as long as all are present.

eg, E major chord

E||--0----|| root
B||--0----|| 5th
G||--1----|| 3rd
D||--2----|| root
A||--2----|| 5th
E||--0----|| root

With me so far?


That's the basic idea.

Know how to construct chords. If you know to build them you can construct them yourself.

You should also take a look at chord inversions.

I wrote a series of articles about them and how to practice them. Hope they help:

What are they :

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/music-theory/what-are-chord-inversions-and-how-to-learn-guitar-chord-inversions/

Their diagrams:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/music-theory/guitar-chord-inversions-diagrams/

And here are some cool etudes to help you learn root, first and second chord inversions:

Root position

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/how-to-practice-root-position-chord-triads/

First inversion

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/how-to-practice-chord-triads-first-inversions/


Second inversions:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/how-to-practice-chord-triads-second-inversions/
#9
When i played in jazz, i found the thing that helped out the most was learning AT LEAST 3 voicings for every chord and which voicings were the easiest to add certain extensions to. For each chord voicing, there's one or two extensions that are way easier to finger than the other voicings.

For example, a chord you'll probably find a lot is an E7. You know by now that there's a few ways to voice it:

020100

079797

0 11 9 9 12 10

and so on. try and get familiar with at least 2 or 3 voicings for each chord, and that will allow you to learn the fretboard much faster and be able to build chords with lightning speed.
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#10
All great advice, with learning and understanding chord constuction being the most important (IMO).

Learn and get comfortable with all the barre voicings and then start working on the moveable shaped chords, this seem the most usual and natural progression for most players.

There is no shortcut but there does seem to be a point where all of a sudden eveything becomes alot easier and a whole new world opens up when you start getting comfortable with multiple voicings.
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#11
I doubt my knowledge of theory (or my playing skills for the matter) are all that (I'm hardly more than a beginner) but I think you've gotta realize that in the end, it's all the same. Whether you use sheet music or tablature is completely irrelevant to how good or professional a musician you are. If you know some music theory and are able to UNDERSTAND why a tab is the way it is and what each bit of it signifies then you're probably okay.
I doubt I could understand complex scores but I can certainly read some sheet music and understand it. Still, I greatly prefer tabs and thus that is what I use (or rather, Guitar Pro print-outs in which I've got tab but can still see the rhythmic figures of the score)

Basically I guess what I'm trying to say is there's a sweet spot for everybody and you just gotta try and get there. Like most anything on guitar, there is not ONE correct way to do it.
#12
You can spend all day reading up on 11ths, m7b5s, and the like, but the only way it's going to get in your head is if you can HEAR the sounds of the chords, and get a feel for how they sound. How to do this? I would start by analyzing all the songs you already know with respect to the harmonic scale of the key they're in. That gives you a baseline for comparing progressions from one song to the next. At first the realizations are more like "damn so and so really abuses the 4-5-6", but eventually as you're learning a new song you'll go, "hey that's an interesting use of iii7-VI7-ii7-V7" or what have you.

You should learn to know a ii-V when you hear it, and play with all the ways you can spice those up. Tritone substitutions come to mind, as does that Jimmy Bruno DVD.

When it comes to actually putting it to the fretboard, posters above me have given good direction there, i.e. learn as many voicings of each chord as you can and how to extend them.

The best advice I can give is think in numbers not letters, wait scratch that, think in sounds AND numbers, but not letters!

Good luck.