#1
Hey A&CG, it's been a while and I need your help. I bought a Yamaha FG01 a couple years back and it's recently (within the past few months) been having some trouble. It first started with some fret buzz on the high e string around the 12th fret, which progressed to the 12-14 frets sounding as the 14th fret (regardless of tuning) and fret buzz around the octave on every string. Initially, I thought it could just be super old strings, but that didn't really help.

So, here's my question: what could be causing this? I would attribute it to poor workmanship as it is a low-end model, but because of the delay, I doubt that it's a factory issue. Also, what would be a standard cost for fixing it? I'm currently in university, so money is a bit tight.

Thanks in advance.

Oh and for what it's worth, I typically store it in a softshell case in a rack between the beds (bunked) at school and on a stand at home. Temperatures are typically around 70 degrees Fahrenheit, though I don't know about humidity. I usually play it about an hour daily.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#2
either your 14th fret has lifted or your truss rod needs adjusting. looking down the neck should identify the problem.
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#3
Its probably the truss rod. I had the same problem with a Yamaha acoustic. I got it fixed at a local guitar shop. With new strings and pegs it only costed $20.
"Its okay if you only know three chords but God, put 'em in the right order" Hank Hill
#4
Quote by DkAAmetalhead
Its probably the truss rod. I had the same problem with a Yamaha acoustic. I got it fixed at a local guitar shop. With new strings and pegs it only costed $20.


Music to my ears. I'll probably take it to a local shop or GC, but I'd like to be able to deal with this myself in the future. Suggestions for resources on fussing with truss rods?
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#5
Certainly. Here's an excellent source of information for you: http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/pagelist.html#Musician

I would be concerned about humidity for the guitar as you've pretty much stated that you're not monitoring or adjusting it. A dried out acoustic can cause you all sorts of issues, many of which you've already said you have. The guitar may come out of it if it's properly humidified again and kept that way. It could also be the age of the instrument and it's just in need of a few simple adjustments. At this point I would recommend that you bring it in to a reputable technician to have it gone over and have them tell you the overall condition of the guitar and what it may need. Don't let them try to soak you for a ton of money either, just state what the issues are that you're having and ask them what you can do on your own to remedy.
#6
Actually if this is a laminate guitar, humidity is of lesser concern than would be an all solid instrument.

Extra light strings can cause a neck to straighten out and the action to become lower over time.

Soundboard braces that have separated can cause the action to become too low.

A qualified tech could sort this out for you in less than five minutes.
#7
i've seen laminate guitars crack badly in dry conditions - my friend rob lost 2 that way. in fact, he's the reason i now keep track of humidity where my guitars are.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
Certainly. Here's an excellent source of information for you: http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/pagelist.html#Musician

I would be concerned about humidity for the guitar as you've pretty much stated that you're not monitoring or adjusting it. A dried out acoustic can cause you all sorts of issues, many of which you've already said you have. The guitar may come out of it if it's properly humidified again and kept that way. It could also be the age of the instrument and it's just in need of a few simple adjustments. At this point I would recommend that you bring it in to a reputable technician to have it gone over and have them tell you the overall condition of the guitar and what it may need. Don't let them try to soak you for a ton of money either, just state what the issues are that you're having and ask them what you can do on your own to remedy.


What he said.
#9
To patticake and captaincranky, I would certainly be concerned about humidity, but it is a laminate guitar and where I live, humidity is only really a problem if you leave your doors and windows wide open, without central air (which we don't). And I use .12s, only because the slots in the nut aren't quite wide enough for .13s.

Thanks for the help LeftyDave. I really do appreciate it, from everyone in fact.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#10
Quote by jwd724
To patticake and captaincranky, I would certainly be concerned about humidity, but it is a laminate guitar and where I live, humidity is only really a problem if you leave your doors and windows wide open, without central air (which we don't). And I use .12s, only because the slots in the nut aren't quite wide enough for .13s.
Humidity is something that has to be judged objectively rather than subjectively. In other words, you need to measure it.

If captivate is correct, laminate guitars are somewhat LESS of a concern, rather than not a concern.

I have an Epi 12 string about 15 yrs old, which I store in a gig bag. It goes through seasonal tuning shifts, but it's hanging together. I don't air condition, but I don't use central heat either. I use kerosene most of the time, and that ADDS water to the air, it doesn't take it away. Our dog days of august hover at 60% RH, possibly more.

Dependent on how the dorm at college is heated, it could be an issue. If you find yourself shooting sparks from your fingertips throughout the winter, then humidity is indeed a concern.

Your statement about "humidity isn't a problem during the summer with central air" is a twitch ambiguous. It's wet in your summers, or dry? Central air is a dryer. It would, I agree, mitigate wild swings of RH, from wet, (summer), to dry, (winter).

Whether I get called on this or not, here goes. I've always found that inexpensive guitars tend to have the action get higher as they age, not lower. Which leaves your issue still mostly unsolved.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 12, 2012,
#11
do you measure your humidity indoors?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#12
I don't have a way to measure humidity at either place (I'd get a hygrometer, but money's pretty tight--also why I haven't gotten a humidifier). It swings from around 20% RH in winter to around 80% in summer, outdoors. My parents' has a gas-powered furnace and I believe the dorm has a similar system.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#13
Air that is too dry can be almost as harmful as air that is too humid for a guitar, whether laminated or not, wood that gets excessively dry can check, crack, or seperate due to shrinkage.

In general too much humidity will cause the neck to come forward and too dry conditions causes the neck to move back.

A plain digital hygrometer costs about $12 and is cheap compared to the cost of having to repair or replace a guitar.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#14
Quote by BlackbirdPie
A plain digital hygrometer costs about $12 and is cheap compared to the cost of having to repair or replace a guitar.


Ah. For some reason, I thought they were more than that. Any model recommendations or will just anything do?
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#15
we have several of these around the house -
http://www.amazon.com/Analog-Hygrometer-2-25-Western-Humidors/dp/B0007VWEQA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1326597245&sr=8-2

you will have to test it, and there's a calibration screw on the back. after that, you're good to go.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#16
I have three of these,
http://www.amazon.com/Springfield-91551-Digital-Humidity-Temperature/dp/B000WU6N0Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1326600144&sr=8-1

and also one of the hygrometers that Patticake links to. All of them read within 3% of each other.

The analog doesn't need batteries and can be calibrated, the only downside it can be harder to read for people with poor eyesight.

The digital needs a single AAA battery (mine have been going over four years without replacement), the display is easy to read, the big downside is that it can't be calibrated, so if you get a bad one, your stuck with it.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
Last edited by BlackbirdPie at Jan 14, 2012,