#1
Not literally of course, I mean with an adaptor/'Y-Splitter' - into 2 branching-out cables

why?

I'm recording guitar to PC, and am using a Line6 UX2, which is a fancy audio interface which adds some very lush tones to your guitar signal, but the flip side is a tiny amount of latency which ruins the fast stuff I play


So...I want to split the cable and run one end into my amp, to monitor with headphones (crucial!), and the other end into the UX2 for the recording.

Can this be done or do the 'rules of electronics' or whatever forbid it...
Or do I need to buy an additional preamp thing to re-balance the signal as well, I saw someone write that it would 'overload the pickups'

Thanks
#2
you can probably pull it off but the latency will still be there. the signal from the amp will be ahead of the line 6. try adjusting the buffer in your daw
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#3
It wouldn't overload the pickups. If anything, the pickups will be weaker since the signal is being split in 2 different sources. Best bet is to pick up and A/B/Y box with a buffer in it to reboost the signal.

Though its probably easier if you adjust buffer settings in your DAW. My buddy has no latency with his UX2
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#4
It's an excellent idea and I use it a lot. It's impossible to get true zero-latency monitoring with a PC interface, no matter how powerful the PC, and how low you can get the ASIO buffers.

Splitting the signal will not affect the quality at all, go ahead.
#5
It's impossible to get true zero-latency monitoring with a PC interface, no matter how powerful the PC


This is what many people spend $$$$ before finally finding out!
There should a discaimer in big red letters on every interface lol

Splitting the signal will not affect the quality at all, go ahead.


Tried this with a simple Y-Splitter, unfortunately it seems to half the power.
I'll invest in a AB/Y box as people have recommended then?

any other creative options?
#6
if you know how to use a soldering iron and can read a schematic, you can build a simple splitter. all you need is something that buffers the signal after the split so you dont lose power. i recomend the front end of this. basicly the thing in the upper left corner and the voltage divider. simple, fairly low parts count, and shouldnt cost much to build (much less than an a/b/y pedal at least).
#7
Quote by kyle62
It's an excellent idea and I use it a lot. It's impossible to get true zero-latency monitoring with a PC interface, no matter how powerful the PC, and how low you can get the ASIO buffers.


Partially true as I understand it.

If the computer needs to do processing of some sort, then no. It can't process and spit it back out in less than 1ms.

However, if there needs not be any processing, then the interface CAN give you true zero latency monitoring if it is designed for that.

That said, anything less than about 20ms is practically imperceptible. It would be like being on a medium-sized stage playing with someone who is 20 feet away. No big deal to play in time with that.

CT
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#8
I have a VHT Valvulator (or whatever it's called) that has two (buffered?) outputs. It lets you run really long cables and crappy pedals and it doubles as a power supply. I only notice it when it's missing. $100 used from eBay but it solved problems for me.
#9
Wait, if you're recording using the modeling program that comes with the UX2, why do you want to have a cable running to your amp as well?
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#10
I run di to the interface and then send that signal back out a 3rd channel to the amp to monitor with. essentially use the interface as a y. this is the unprocessed signal which is important and keeps the lag out.
#11
Could just get a reamp box? Record your signal clean and then effect it after? Not sure if that's how reamp boxes work...
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