#1
Uh yeah so im having real trouble doing pinch harmonics on my Les Paul Prophecy EX but on my schecter Omen 6 extreme it's like the easiest thing in the world, before i got the schecter i just thought i was bad at it but what could be the problem? I've already changed the battery for the emg's in my LP so it's not like their output is low or anything?
#2
There was a thread like this not long ago. It's a little easier on some instruments vs others. On my Schecter C1 Classic it's extremely easy but I've found it a little more difficult on other instruments. Since you can do it on your Schecter I won't go into technique details only to say that you need to find the nodes on the individual strings and use the bridge pickup whenever possible. It's much easier to get a harmonic through and loud using the bridge pickup. With that said though I'm not an expert in active pickups so maybe someone else can help you more. I only know that from one instrument to another it can be a little more challenging (length of strings from the end of the fretboard to the bridge, etc. Finding the individual harmonic nodes on all strings, etc) things like that. Sorry I can't be of much help but I would just keep trying.
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#3
They have a different scale length.

Your LPs "sweet spot" is in a different place so just have a look around for it.

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#4
thanks for the help but i've tried all over the length of the string between the bridge and fretboard and it still wont sound good, could there be a problem with the action of the strings or other mechanical problem? Perhaps raising the pickups?
#6
yesi have a different gauge on my lp i have Ernie Ball power slinkys on my Omen and a 7-string set on my LP, but before i started using thicker strings it was the same deal with the pinch harmonics
Last edited by tim_snopro at Jan 11, 2012,
#7
Quote by tim_snopro
thanks for the help but i've tried all over the length of the string between the bridge and fretboard and it still wont sound good, could there be a problem with the action of the strings or other mechanical problem? Perhaps raising the pickups?


That may be the issue, I found with EMG equipped guitars that they needed to have the pickups raised higher than passive pickups. EMG's actually have weaker magnets, getting most of the tone from the preamp wired into the circuit in the EMG's (hence the need for a battery to power them).
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#8
Okay thanks, i might try raising them, but first i'll buy new strings i just broke the A-string -.-
#9
Funnily enough I have the opposite problem. I can hit pinch harmonics all day long every time perfectly on any Les Paul but hand me a super-Strat and I'm screwed.

Pinch harmonics on different guitars really does come down to just finding the right spot. Scale length is the main cause, but string thickness, tuning and string height can have a very slight effect (we're talking fractions of a mm here, differences so small you shouldn't really notice). Of course as you move your hand around ot find different spots the angle you're picking at will also change, as will the part of your thumb you use to touch the string to get the harmonic. It becomes a big mess of trying to match the exact right pick angle with the same force and the same thumb action combined with finding different places too - it all becomes a big guessing game, really.

tl;dr

The point is, it's not the fault of the guitar. There is nothing about a guitar that can stop pinch harmonics from happening. Pinch harmonics are all - all - technique. Just keep practising.
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#10
Quote by MrFlibble
Funnily enough I have the opposite problem. I can hit pinch harmonics all day long every time perfectly on any Les Paul but hand me a super-Strat and I'm screwed.

Pinch harmonics on different guitars really does come down to just finding the right spot. Scale length is the main cause, but string thickness, tuning and string height can have a very slight effect (we're talking fractions of a mm here, differences so small you shouldn't really notice). Of course as you move your hand around ot find different spots the angle you're picking at will also change, as will the part of your thumb you use to touch the string to get the harmonic. It becomes a big mess of trying to match the exact right pick angle with the same force and the same thumb action combined with finding different places too - it all becomes a big guessing game, really.

tl;dr

The point is, it's not the fault of the guitar. There is nothing about a guitar that can stop pinch harmonics from happening. Pinch harmonics are all - all - technique. Just keep practising.


totally agree with this. it really is about technique and finding the sweet spots on the neck. this may vary somewhat with different guitars even if it's the same make and scale length. you should be able to get a harmonic to sound even if the guitar isn't plugged in (best way to practice this if you ask me. once you get it down it will come naturally regardless of guitar being played.
#11
Yeah scale length will affect things and shift the spots a little where you get your harmonics and obviously you want to make sure your technique is bullet proof but some guitars will make your harmonics seem more or less prominent beacause the guitars sound darker or brighter from the materials used to make them. Some pickups seem to fare better than others when higher frequency harmonics are played. I have a few guitars with dimarzio freds in the bridge and they punch out pinched harmonics no fuss. I have other guitars which just dont push the harmonics through an amp as well even if you play them bang on and can hear them acoustically from the strings directly. I would agree that it's worth practising on guitars without an amp as well. If you can get the harmonics without an amp then it will seem easy when you do eventually plug in.