#1
ive only bothered learning the minor scale and pentatonic because of the fact that every minor key has its relative major , therefore knowing the minor scale in all the minor keys i simultaneously know the majors (just changing the root), but looking on the internet i always see that minor scales and major scales are tabbed out differently , i was wondering if theres any reason for this and if theres any benefit to leaning these different positions
#2
If a song has a major key, it uses a major scale.

If a song has a minor key, it uses a major scale.

You're right in saying that there's relative major and minor scales, that share the same notes. However that's pretty much where the similarities end. For example C major and A minor share the same notes. The root of one is A, the others root is C. One is major, one is minor. They actually don't sound that much alike.
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#3
Quote by AlanHB
If a song has a major key, it uses a major scale.

If a song has a minor key, it uses a major scale.

Don't listen to this poster, as shown by the above he has no idea what he's talking about and certainly shouldn't be moderating this forum.
#4
Scales are not simply positions, shapes or tabs - if all you do is learn the shapes then technically you've not really learned much of anything.

Learning a scale shape is showing you where to find the notes of a particular major or minor scale. However, if you don't actually know what that scale is, how it functions and how and when it can be used then merely knowing where to find it isn't an awful lot of use to you.

Knowing the patterns the scale forms helps you apply your knowledge of that scale to the guitar - knowledge you don't actually possess yet.
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#5
Quote by steven seagull
Scales are not simply positions, shapes or tabs - if all you do is learn the shapes then technically you've not really learned much of anything.

Learning a scale shape is showing you where to find the notes of a particular major or minor scale. However, if you don't actually know what that scale is, how it functions and how and when it can be used then merely knowing where to find it isn't an awful lot of use to you.

Knowing the patterns the scale forms helps you apply your knowledge of that scale to the guitar - knowledge you don't actually possess yet.


expanding on that, learn the major scale first, how it is built, how it works... it'll be the basis for all other scales, chord construction, and a lot of useful stuff
#6
Quote by :-D
Don't listen to this poster, as shown by the above he has no idea what he's talking about and certainly shouldn't be moderating this forum.


Lol! I mean't minor, noooooo off to bed I go!
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
There's no benefit in learning scale positions while thinking you're learning a scale. You're better off actually learning the notes on the fretboard, the major scale, and the chords built from it.
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#8
Here's the thing:

You already know how to find the minor scale on the guitar, which is great.

But now you need to learn to understand it. You need to learn to "think in minor." Because notes sound different in a minor context than they do in a major context. The physical part - learning where the notes are on the guitar and how to quickly an efficiently play them - is the easy part.
#9
In one sentence, Knowledge is power.

Do you want the power son???

Do you???!!!

Well go on out there boy and get it! Grab ahold of it!!! Don't let anything stop you, youre a man, a machine...a man machine!!!!!

Wait, what was the question?

(Scales help form the backbone of understanding everything from melody to chord progressions, the more that you understand these and their relationship, the more you can understand and recognize the big picture of what youre doing as a whole, which has definite advantages)

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by AlanHB
If a song has a major key, it uses a major scale.

If a song has a minor key, it uses a major scale.

You're right in saying that there's relative major and minor scales, that share the same notes. However that's pretty much where the similarities end. For example C major and A minor share the same notes. The root of one is A, the others root is C. One is major, one is minor. They actually don't sound that much alike.


You should give yourself a 30 day ban!
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#11
Quote by Woffelz
You should give yourself a 30 day ban!


Well, to be fair, any given minor scale is based off a relative major scale. A minor is really just the notes of C major resolving to a different root, thereby changing the function of each of the notes for what I understand.
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