#1
Hey guys, so my band recently wrote a song and in the verse I use a chord progression in Am, I was wondering, would there be anything 'technically' wrong with using a riff (IE singular played notes rather than chords) in the chorus? So you'd basically have a open chord based verse, then a riff for the chorus? The riff is in Am pentatonic so it's not out of key or anything, I was just wondering what the theory is on switching from a chords based verse to singular notes in the chorus?

Many thanks!
#3
My comment, if it sounds good, do it and don't worry about the theory. But, if ya really need to know, just take a look at the notes your playing and see which are in the scale, if you borrow notes from other scales ( major/minor etc.)

It also depends on what you want in the song, so I cant really give you any direction that way
#4
Quote by controlledchaos
Hey guys, so my band recently wrote a song and in the verse I use a chord progression in Am, I was wondering, would there be anything 'technically' wrong with using a riff (IE singular played notes rather than chords) in the chorus? So you'd basically have a open chord based verse, then a riff for the chorus? The riff is in Am pentatonic so it's not out of key or anything, I was just wondering what the theory is on switching from a chords based verse to singular notes in the chorus?

Many thanks!


There is no theory regarding song structuring. It's completely up to you.
#5
If it sounds good, it is good.
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#6
Rule #1 of songwriting: There are no ****in' rules.
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