#1
I want to replace the roundwound strings on my Telecaster with flatwound strings of the same size. Will I need to make any adjustments to the guitar? I'm not changing size or anything, just switching from round to flatwound.
#2
Nope. Not a thing.

Out of curiousity, whyd you switch?
Slide alot?

\/ Cool. I'd think it would round out that twang a bit. Good luck!
Last edited by StonedColdCrazy at Jan 11, 2012,
#3
Alright thanks. I'm switching because the band that I'm in is playing indie rock with a lot of influence from old surf music and rockabilly so I want a slightly more mellow tone than I'm getting right now. I also have a guitar with humbuckers I could use but it doesn't really give me any of the twang that I want. I'm guessing that the flat wounds would allow me to keep most of the twang without my tone being too piercing.
#4
You want twang and you are switching to flatwounds?
Huh?

You will get nice ringing and chime from the high strings of a flatwound set, but the lower strings will give you a thud. You do realize that flatwounds will mellow out your sound, not make it twangier.

I have flatwounds on the king of twang guitars, my Gretsch White Falcon. Guess what happened to the twang? Gone. (But I don't care because I bought the guitar to be used as a rockin' beast, like The Cult's Billy Duffy, not to be used as a twang machine.) Depending upon what pickup you switch to, flatwounds can give you a great classic rock sound, or a nice warm, mellow jazzy sound.

Twang comes from bright roundwounds on a Telecaster or a Gretsch. You want twang? Get a Tele and string her with the brightest round wound strings you can find.

Flatwounds on my Falcon = goodbye twang, hello kick ass rock:

#5
Flatwounds will give you a very mellow, warm sound, they sound pretty good with distortion, but will give a very dark and muddy sound...If you want clarity under lots of gain, forget it...if you want warmness under gain, go for it.

It's a totally different feel as well, takes some getting used to.
#8
Quote by StonedColdCrazy
Read the post again casino. You misunderstood.
Btw you gave me gas for a 12 hollow you jerk....

So this guy has a Tele with roundwounds...and he wants to switch to flatwounds for more twang?
He's going in the wrong direction.
#9
Quote by fuzzpedal
Alright thanks. I'm switching because the band that I'm in is playing indie rock with a lot of influence from old surf music and rockabilly so I want a slightly more mellow tone than I'm getting right now. I also have a guitar with humbuckers I could use but it doesn't really give me any of the twang that I want. I'm guessing that the flat wounds would allow me to keep most of the twang without my tone being too piercing.


Bolded for emphasis.

\/ yes but just to dull it down a bit.
Last edited by StonedColdCrazy at Jan 11, 2012,
#10
Quote by fuzzpedal
I also have a guitar with humbuckers I could use but it doesn't really give me any of the twang that I want.

Bolded for emphasis.

So this guy doesn't want to use one guitar because it is short in the twang department, and wants the twang of his Tele yet wants to switch to flatwounds and still keep twang.
#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
In that case...no, there will be alot more tension, and the string will have almost no buzz to them, but you shouldn't need any adjustments.

So the increased tension won't cause my neck to bow? I'm actually getting some fret buzz now so this may be another good reason to switch. Also, to all the people arguing about the tone, I had read that a lot of the rockabilly and surf guys from the '60s were using flatwounds on Fender guitars. I really like the tone they get that's slightly twangy but also sort of deep and dark at the same time. I was able to get close to the sound by eqing my amp with a bit more bass and using a short slapback delay to thicken the tone but I'm still not quite there so I thought the flatwound strings must be what I'm missing.

Edit: Maybe I'm just being too picky about my tone but the way I see it it's only about $10 wasted if I don't like the flatwounds so I might as well try it as long as it won't mess up my guitar.
Last edited by fuzzpedal at Jan 11, 2012,
#12
Quote by fuzzpedal
So the increased tension won't cause my neck to bow? I'm actually getting some fret buzz now so this may be another good reason to switch. Also, to all the people arguing about the tone, I had read that a lot of the rockabilly and surf guys from the '60s were using flatwounds on Fender guitars. I really like the tone they get that's slightly twangy but also sort of deep and dark at the same time. I was able to get close to the sound by eqing my amp with a bit more bass and using a short slapback delay to thicken the tone but I'm still not quite there so I thought the flatwound strings must be what I'm missing.


Nah, Fenders are pretty tough guitars. I could switch from .010's to .011's without any change in the neck on my Squier, which the neck is considerably thinner than a Tele. If you jump in gauge like .09's to .012's then you might consider making some adjustments, but if it's just minor changes then it wont bother it.

But after you string them up, double check your measurements and action to make sure...better to be safe than sorry.
#13
Quote by fuzzpedal
Edit: Maybe I'm just being too picky about my tone but the way I see it it's only about $10 wasted if I don't like the flatwounds so I might as well try it as long as it won't mess up my guitar.

Bingo. It's a cheap thing to try. Just do it.

You should know that flatwounds actually give you lower action. Don't know the whys behind it, but flatwounds simply give you lower action.

Other things you will find:
- flats are a dream to play, so smooth and easy
- flats will make your guitar suddenly become a professional musical instrument. If you were going to sell a guitar for $500, put flatwounds on it and you can fool people and sell that same guitar for $800. Flats really do make the instrument a better player.
- flats will sound very dull on the low end strings. THUD. Get used to that sound.
- you will hear a very big difference between the wrapped EAD strings and the plain GBE strings. Hope your guitar has adjustable pole pieces. You may have to make adjustments to even out the volume.
- a wound G works very good with flats. Evens out the total sound more.

I keep flats on three of my guitars. They offer a very nice difference in tone and playability. I like to rock-a-billy out now and then and though the flats don't give you a Brian Setzer tone (his is very crisp and hard and gritty), flats will give you an early Elvis/Scotty Moore tone. Touch of slap back, heavy reverb, flats and you can sound just like you are in Sun Studios.