#1
im trying to learn the song Nightrain by Guns N' Roses and I got most of it down pretty good up until Slash's first solo. Ive tried slowing it down for two weeks now and cant get much faster than when i started it. the fastest I can do it sometimes is like half speed. when I try to get faster my fingers just trip over themselves and hit the wrong strings or i bend the wrong note.

are there special practices i can do to make it easier or should i just stick to playing it slow for a bit longer?

@2:15 its just that quick lick lasts like 3 seconds, but i cant get it down

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssTJuEDeikI
#2
Just really pay attention to the way your picking hand is moving. Make sure that your pick strokes use the minimum amount of movement. Also, make sure to breathe and perhaps stretch out as these contribute to all your muscles staying nice and loose so that you don't tense up. Lastly, your posture has a lot to do with being able to play fast so make sure that you're sitting comfortably with good posture. Here's a good video on posture by Freepower from the UG forums http://www.youtube.com/watch?src_vid=OyvGD9edWcg&annotation_id=annotation_984775&feature=iv&v=ZcIZaZthqbg

Combine all that with some nice, slow metronome practice and you're on the fast track.
Quote by skylerjames13
This +10000

You're a decent 11'er Bryc3e


Nothing can keep you away from the need to create.. Cause your path is free! - Jari Maenpaa
Last edited by Bryc3e at Jan 12, 2012,
#3
Simplest answer, start really slow an work your way up gradually as your accuracy becomes 100% consistently at each speed. Not just "ok I got it that one time, now let's speed it up". Make sure you got it perfect, or very near perfect, before increasing tempo.

I JUST used this technique to do an acoustic cover of "Don't Cry" by GNR. I wanted to do a TON of arpeggio because I love the way the chord progression sounds on an acoustic, but I wanted it to be more complex than just chords and didn't want to copy Slash's picking exactly. I had a specific string order I wanted to pick for each chord, and each chords pattern was different. Let me tell you, it gave me a bit of trouble in the accuracy department. But if I couldn't get it at that speed I'd just slow down a bit and pay extra attention to my trouble part. I have the timeline one my voice memos section in my phone, because I was recording it. It took me exactly 23 minutes from my first recording attempt to my final one which was a perfect runthrough, and it's a challenging part (arpeggio picking at faster tempos, it is for me anyway).

If you start slow and gradually speed up then before you know it your playing full speed and it feels effortless. Start even slower than you think you need to, remember, the Whole point is to be accurate because that's what your training your muscle memory to play without having to really think about, so accuracy is key.
#4
Quote by Agent51
Simplest answer, start really slow an work your way up gradually as your accuracy becomes 100% consistently at each speed. Not just "ok I got it that one time, now let's speed it up". Make sure you got it perfect, or very near perfect, before increasing tempo.

I JUST used this technique to do an acoustic cover of "Don't Cry" by GNR. I wanted to do a TON of arpeggio because I love the way the chord progression sounds on an acoustic, but I wanted it to be more complex than just chords and didn't want to copy Slash's picking exactly. I had a specific string order I wanted to pick for each chord, and each chords pattern was different. Let me tell you, it gave me a bit of trouble in the accuracy department. But if I couldn't get it at that speed I'd just slow down a bit and pay extra attention to my trouble part. I have the timeline one my voice memos section in my phone, because I was recording it. It took me exactly 23 minutes from my first recording attempt to my final one which was a perfect runthrough, and it's a challenging part (arpeggio picking at faster tempos, it is for me anyway).

If you start slow and gradually speed up then before you know it your playing full speed and it feels effortless. Start even slower than you think you need to, remember, the Whole point is to be accurate because that's what your training your muscle memory to play without having to really think about, so accuracy is key.


Very well said.

If want a logical explanation too you should check out my free ebook. Read chapters 1 and 2 to get the idea

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/
Last edited by apajr at Jan 12, 2012,
#5
Oh and also, "just walk away" is a good rule sometimes too. Not permanently but either play a different song, or a few other songs, and go back to it. Or even don't okay it til next session, or a few sessions in between. It sounds weird but many times when in stuck on a song I'll stop trying it for a bit then I go back and it seems easier to play. I think you get frustrate or drained on a song when you struggle whether you realize it or not and that break lets you approach it fresh and not aggravated or over thinking .