#1
I was just wondering, since I bought my classical guitar when I didn't even know what action was, if mine is within normal ranges.

At the first fret, it's about 2.5mm high (0.01 inches) and at the 12th fret it's 7mm (0.28 inches) high.

Isn't this pretty high? I'm learning bar chords right now and I'm thinking maybe my guitar isn't really good for that kind of stuff (I'm buying an electric this summer ), but then again, if I can do it on this guitar, I can do it on any guitar right?
#2
action on almost every guitar i've ever bought was too high. have it lowered to your taste, and your guitar will play the way that suits you rather than the way some factory sets it up.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
What is a normal action height for a classical guitar?

PS: I think I'd have to scrape the bottom off the bridge, that's the only way I can lower the action height, and that would give me an extra 2mm or so ...
#4
Quote by Kristof_EG
I was just wondering, since I bought my classical guitar when I didn't even know what action was, if mine is within normal ranges.

At the first fret, it's about 2.5mm high (0.01 inches) and at the 12th fret it's 7mm (0.28 inches) high.

Isn't this pretty high? I'm learning bar chords right now and I'm thinking maybe my guitar isn't really good for that kind of stuff (I'm buying an electric this summer ), but then again, if I can do it on this guitar, I can do it on any guitar right?


The action on my classical guitar (first guitar too) is pretty high, never really bothered me though.

You should find chords are relatively easy on a classical (esp compared to steel stringed acoustics). Nylon strings are a lot kinder to your fingers. Stick with it, not worth the effort of altering the action on a classical if you're getting an electric soon enough...
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Last edited by emhaslam at Jan 12, 2012,
#5
Yeah, open chords are not a problem at all, neither are power chords
Just wanted to find out if it is normal

It's a Santos y Mayor, not a very common name I guess ... If I knew then what I know now, I probably would've gone with a more well-known brand, even though I'm quite happy with this one
Last edited by Kristof_EG at Jan 12, 2012,
#6
Classical guitars tend to have somewhat higher action than steel strings as the strings have a wider area of oscillation.
Also, they have much less tension and are easier to fret, so a higher action can be tolerated.

The answer is... Low enough so that you don't get string buzz in your normal style of playing.
#7
Quote by patticake
action on almost every guitar i've ever bought was too high. have it lowered to your taste, and your guitar will play the way that suits you rather than the way some factory sets it up.

+1
Most acoustics & classicals are not really set up at all from the factory. They leave a saddle that is purposely too high to give you plenty of room for personal adjustment without replacing the one the guitar comes with. A personal setup on a new classical or acoustic is almost mandatory. That being said, detensioning the strings to enable the removal of the saddle, carefully sanding the bottom of the saddle with >400 grit paper on a FLAT surface is rather easy to accomplish yourself. It may take many tries to eventually get the right action, but as long as nothing else is messed up with the guitar, the worst that can happen is you'll need a new saddle.
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#8
When adjusting the action, the nut is as important, and if the player uses a lot of lower frets, more important than the saddle.
The fellow at Frets.com recommends nut first, then saddle.
Unfortunately, special tools are required.