#1
Basicly the tech set the action way too high for my taste (it's like 5mm at the 12th fret) but the worst thing is that he messed around with my pickups height and now they have a ridiculous outpout and it seems to me that they've lost clarity and they are even noisy now. (mostly the two single coils which before were totally fine and crystal clear). My guitar is a Yamaha Pacifica 112v btw. Now I understand that to lower the action I have to adjust the saddles with an allen key but since there are two saddles for each string I don't know what I should do exactly with them, I have to turn both or just one ? clockwise or counter-clockwise ?
Last edited by francesco18 at Jan 13, 2012,
#2
If he ****ed it up take it back to the store and tell him to do it again.
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#5
just fix it yourself...the tech is an idiot but this isn't rocket science

Here's how to do it yourself:
1) righty tighty
2) lefty loosey
3) .......?
4) profit
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Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#6
Quote by StonedColdCrazy
Righty tighty. (clockwise) Both screws.
Adjust the pickup height to your liking.


please stop using a time machine to copy my posts.
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#7
Quote by mike_oxbig
please stop using a time machine to copy my posts.

I cant help it. I masturbate so fast my hands go back in time and type all sorts of crazy shit.
#8
Thank you all for your help. For now I've only adjusted the humbucker in bridge position which is now like 4 mm far from every strings. Can someone give me some reference points for adjusting the two single coils height ? What's considered too far/too close in terms of millimeters ?
#9
There is no right or wrong height. It all depends on the sound you want, the pickups, the guitar, the strings you use - everything. As a general rule though, the magnetic pull from single coils is stronger than humbuckers so it's better to keep them at least 4mm away from thick strings and 3mm from thin ones.

The way I adjust pickup height is I put all pickups as low as possible then I raise the neck pcikup until it sounds the way I want it, then I adjust the bridge and middle pickups to match the neck in output. But that's because I value the neck tone more than the middle or bridge tone. You may prefer to do it another way around. But starting low and working your way up is a good way to go about it.

Pickups being further away gives them better clarity, you get a little more sustain and your pickups will react to the more subtle frequencies better. Having pickups close to the strings gives you more output and gives you a stronger core tone, but you miss out on some of the harmonic overtones and your sustain can be hurt quite badly, especially by a powerful neck pickup.
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#10
Quote by MrFlibble
There is no right or wrong height. It all depends on the sound you want, the pickups, the guitar, the strings you use - everything. As a general rule though, the magnetic pull from single coils is stronger than humbuckers so it's better to keep them at least 4mm away from thick strings and 3mm from thin ones.

The way I adjust pickup height is I put all pickups as low as possible then I raise the neck pcikup until it sounds the way I want it, then I adjust the bridge and middle pickups to match the neck in output. But that's because I value the neck tone more than the middle or bridge tone. You may prefer to do it another way around. But starting low and working your way up is a good way to go about it.

Pickups being further away gives them better clarity, you get a little more sustain and your pickups will react to the more subtle frequencies better. Having pickups close to the strings gives you more output and gives you a stronger core tone, but you miss out on some of the harmonic overtones and your sustain can be hurt quite badly, especially by a powerful neck pickup.


Great explanation, thanks. The thing is...he also restringed my guitar using some D'Addario 10-46 ( ), and it's like the wound strings resonate too much now, like they're a lot more ''twangy'' sounding (which I hate), now I don't know if this ''new sound'' I get is because of the new strings or because he modified the pickups height; anyway I will try to mess around with my single coils height later and see if I can get my ''old sound'' back.
#11
It's probably a little bit of both. New strings will always sound brighter and have more "twang" to them, but also having the string height higher increases the string tension a little bit which will add to that snap.
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#12
Wow, string height of 5mm at the 12th fret is really high!

I normally shoot for 2/32" (string height above the top of the fret, not the wood level) on the unwound high strings, increasing a bit to 5/64th for the low strings. But then I sometimes need to raise things very slightly more, if I'm getting any fret buzz.

Before doing that, though, it's good to check if your neck relief is at least reasonably right. Different people like different amounts of relief, but if you fret the strings at both the 1st fret and the highest fret at the same time, there should be a small amount of clearance at about the midpoint of the string. Maybe just the thickness of a high-E or B string, but still a bit of clearance. If there's no clearance, you want to loosen the truss rod a tad (no more than a quarter turn at a time), let it "settle", and then check again. Conversely, if you have a big gap, you might want to decrease it by tightening the truss rod a tad. If you play pretty lightly/gently, then minimal relief is good. But if you are really picking hard, especially on the low strings, you might benefit from some more relief (more gap in the middle). Sometimes people make the strings high to avoid fret buzz, when part of the problem is due to a neck with no relief, or worse, a bit of "back-bow".

When adjusting your string height at the saddles, turn the two screws equal amounts, basically to keep the saddle level with the base of the bridge (assuming it was level to begin with). Clockwise (tightening) raises the string, CCW lowers it.

Obviously if you are lowering your strings, the pickups will also need lowering. Plus, the symptoms you described made it sound like they were too high, even with the high string action.

A general recommendation I've seen is to have the pup be around 5/64 or 3/32 below the strings, measured with the highest fret being fretted. But I like them a bit lower than that.

You can play around with the height a bit to balance the output of the various pups, and do a bit of "tilting" if you want to change the balance between the high and low strings. (Or do a bit of per-string output tweaking using the pole-pieces.)
Last edited by rschleicher at Jan 13, 2012,
#13
I know that at the shop I work at, we would take it back and fix it for no cost. Try that. Just tell him he messed it up
#14
I believe there is no right or wrong way to set-up a guitar, of course some ways are just pretty darn wrong but to each their own, i mean, malmsteen even has a strat with the action as high as the moon and he plays it wonderfully

Get your action right and then work on the pickups at your own pace depending on what you want, it's what i do instead of paying a horrendous amount to someone else who wont even achieve the sweet spot sound i want. Use your ears and everything will be alright when adjusting it Each time you adjust the action remember to also adjust the pickup height since it will obviously be different from what you want, but i say adjust the action disregarding the pickup height and then work on the pickups.

I only take a guitar to a tech when it's something that scape my prowess or the tools i have access to fix said problem are not enough or i don't have the tool :/ That's some extreme cases there mate.
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#15
Quote by Heilz

I only take a guitar to a tech when it's something that scape my prowess or the tools i have access to fix said problem are not enough or i don't have the tool :/ That's some extreme cases there mate.


I only took the guitar to him because I had a problem with my high frets...from 19th to 22th the strings sounded ''stopped'' as something was prevent them to resonate, I suggested that maybe it was a neck problem but he said that the neck looked fine to him and that it was just a bridge problem and he fixed it by raising my bridge. I can't take it back to him because the store is not exactly near to where I live. I understand however that these are all things easily fixable by myself (at least I hope that). Let's see what I can do with your instructions, a screwdriver, an allen key and some c4 plastic explosive.
#16
Quote by rschleicher
Wow, string height of 5mm at the 12th fret is really high!

I normally shoot for 2/32" (string height above the top of the fret, not the wood level) on the unwound high strings, increasing a bit to 5/64th for the low strings. But then I sometimes need to raise things very slightly more, if I'm getting any fret buzz.

Before doing that, though, it's good to check if your neck relief is at least reasonably right. Different people like different amounts of relief, but if you fret the strings at both the 1st fret and the highest fret at the same time, there should be a small amount of clearance at about the midpoint of the string. Maybe just the thickness of a high-E or B string, but still a bit of clearance. If there's no clearance, you want to loosen the truss rod a tad (no more than a quarter turn at a time), let it "settle", and then check again. Conversely, if you have a big gap, you might want to decrease it by tightening the truss rod a tad. If you play pretty lightly/gently, then minimal relief is good. But if you are really picking hard, especially on the low strings, you might benefit from some more relief (more gap in the middle). Sometimes people make the strings high to avoid fret buzz, when part of the problem is due to a neck with no relief, or worse, a bit of "back-bow".

When adjusting your string height at the saddles, turn the two screws equal amounts, basically to keep the saddle level with the base of the bridge (assuming it was level to begin with). Clockwise (tightening) raises the string, CCW lowers it.

Obviously if you are lowering your strings, the pickups will also need lowering. Plus, the symptoms you described made it sound like they were too high, even with the high string action.

A general recommendation I've seen is to have the pup be around 5/64 or 3/32 below the strings, measured with the highest fret being fretted. But I like them a bit lower than that.

You can play around with the height a bit to balance the output of the various pups, and do a bit of "tilting" if you want to change the balance between the high and low strings. (Or do a bit of per-string output tweaking using the pole-pieces.)


Wow, thank you for this great informative post. Now I need just to convert your US inches to my European millimeters and i'm all set.