#1
I have developed a new interest in developing myself as a guitarist through a chordal based approach. (this is a large deviation from my interests and approaches to the instrument over the past 2 years) Can anyone recommend me some "chordal based" virtuosso guitarists to listen to/analyze/and base my technical development upon in this area?

Oh, and by this point I am pretty set in my ways as a "pick-style" guitarist...I have no objection/aversion to chord voicings on non-adjascent strings but I imagine that my exclusive commitment to pick-style guitar playing will limit me w/ regard to certain aspects of chordal counterpoint on guitar...I am OK with this...and have little to no desire to become an expert at something like say...finger style flammenco...but that being said, I have faith that the vast chordal posibilities of pick-style guitar will offer more than enough to keep me interested for a long time to come.

Who are some virtuossos of the Chord-change?
#2
Eric Johnson. The man can make sex out of triads.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnqpOFcBiMM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcI1tBPEqVM

Allan Holdsworth is a chord champ as well.
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Last edited by Acϵ♠ at Jan 13, 2012,
#7
Definitely agreed on Johnson and Holdsworth. The suggestion of some of Hendrix's ideas as a starting point is also sound.

In general, getting into the harmony in jazz will open worlds of possibilities for chordal playing, including chord melodies and tuttis. And Bach, particularly if you want your "chords" to really be emergent from melodic counterpoint.

I would suggest biting the bullet and opening yourself up to some degree of finger-style playing. I myself am by no means an advanced finger-style player, but I've gotten used to mostly playing chords and double stops with my fingers, and some things just wouldnt feel or sound right with a pick. Finger-style, you can pretty easily do some nice arpeggiations and melodic usage of chords, and tap into dynamics well. And it can invoke interesting tones.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Jan 13, 2012,
#8
Randy Rhoads had some interesting stuff on the more intricate playing he did with Ozzy, like Diary of a Madman and Goodbye to Romance.
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#10
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#12
Quote by Brainpolice2
Definitely agreed on Johnson and Holdsworth. The suggestion of some of Hendrix's ideas as a starting point is also sound.

In general, getting into the harmony in jazz will open worlds of possibilities for chordal playing, including chord melodies and tuttis. And Bach, particularly if you want your "chords" to really be emergent from melodic counterpoint.

I would suggest biting the bullet and opening yourself up to some degree of finger-style playing. I myself am by no means an advanced finger-style player, but I've gotten used to mostly playing chords and double stops with my fingers, and some things just wouldnt feel or sound right with a pick. Finger-style, you can pretty easily do some nice arpeggiations and melodic usage of chords, and tap into dynamics well. And it can invoke interesting tones.


Definitely this and +1 on Eric Johnson. Finger-style will allow you to better understand triads and full chords with techniques such as fast rolling and changes as well as split chords (used quite frequently -- see Clapton, Tears in Heaven). Finger-style makes approaching these pieces much easier and tends to have a more melodic tone. Picks are great for what they are for but some things are much easier played, and sound better in finger-style.
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#13
Bit off-topic but **** I can't deal with Holdsworth. Swear in every interview he just carries on about how much he hates guitar and wishes he could play the horn etc. Just play the ****ing horn then and shut the **** up.
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#14
Quote by GibsonMan321
Randy Rhoads had some interesting stuff on the more intricate playing he did with Ozzy, like Diary of a Madman and Goodbye to Romance.


"You Can't Kill Rock N' Roll", "Tonight", and "S.A.T.O." have some interesting chord ideas and are good to learn

I would check out Michael Lee Firkins, he's a beast building chordal songs. "Runaway Train" uses basic barre-chord shapes and some Hybird picking to make it sound like... a Runaway train!
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#15
Robben Ford, check him out

And of course Randy but that goes without saying!!!!
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#17
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#18
Django Reinhardt. His chord choice had to be pretty interesting and esoteric because his fretting hand was injured in a fire. He's got some really awesome chord lines.
#19
Quote by Forkman
Bit off-topic but **** I can't deal with Holdsworth. Swear in every interview he just carries on about how much he hates guitar and wishes he could play the horn etc. Just play the ****ing horn then and shut the **** up.


I think in his case it's more like a reeded instrument that he's going for, like an oboe or a clarinet.

It's never really bothered me.
#20
A few of the "djent" crowd do some very interesting things with chords, check out these two guys:

Misha Mansoor: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjEiOu9Bkuk

John Browne: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGwI0mzKDOk

For metal players they use some much more interesting chords than you might otherwise expect. Also check out the guys from Cynic:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ONfEvpEd7Q


However, that said: look in to hybrid picking, you get to keep everything you know about normal pickstyle playing but add in elements of finger picking. That is: use a pick and the free fingers at the same time.
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#21
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
A few of the "djent" crowd do some very interesting things with chords, check out these two guys:

Misha Mansoor: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjEiOu9Bkuk

John Browne: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGwI0mzKDOk

For metal players they use some much more interesting chords than you might otherwise expect. Also check out the guys from Cynic:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ONfEvpEd7Q


However, that said: look in to hybrid picking, you get to keep everything you know about normal pickstyle playing but add in elements of finger picking. That is: use a pick and the free fingers at the same time.

+100

Good calls all around.

[GELDIT]
Also, Opeth uses some interesting chords and suspensions. Mikael Akerfeldt says he doesn't know much theory and just uses what sounds good, which leads him to make some really cool choices with his chords.

Scale the Summit do a lot of neat jazzy things with chords too.
Last edited by Geldin at Jan 13, 2012,