#1
If a drummer is drumming in 13/8 or 12/8 or 3/4 etc. can you play leads over it without counting at all...like just improv or do whatever as you are use to in 4/4?

I have never gotten into other time sigs so I am not sure what to do lead while over them...
#2
Well, leads in 4/4 would sound kind of off( unless you do it for three measures of 4/4 whilst your drummer plays four measures of 3/4, that actually sounds pretty good imo ).
What I do when we're playing in an odd time signature is I keep my licks short, for me that way it's easier to stay in time. If you play a lick that is 'too long' for the time signature, it will often sound a bit.. off.. but if you use shorter licks you can always stop for a moment if the measure is about to end, or if you have time, throw in another lick.

Works for me, anyway ^^
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#3
would it be a good idea to just find the easy beats to keep track of and just play any duration of notes on it? like in 6/8 I can feel 2 down beats in each measure so should I just play anything as long as it is within the confines of the 2 beat count I feel? and can you do the same with other time sigs?
#4
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
If a drummer is drumming in 13/8 or 12/8 or 3/4 etc. can you play leads over it without counting at all...like just improv or do whatever as you are use to in 4/4?

I have never gotten into other time sigs so I am not sure what to do lead while over them...

Basically, it's like anything else; it'll become natural as you do it more and more. Since I play a lot of prog stuff I've gotten very used to playing in odd time signatures, so I can pick them out pretty easily and they won't sound unnatural. Just find whatever music you can (be it songs, backing tracks, whatever) and keep playing in that groove until it feels right, so to speak.

For me specifically, odd time signatures feel incomplete in a way; that's not anything to do with the time signature itself, just how I internalize the rhythm. So usually if I'm playing a lead over 7/8, 11/8 or something it'll reflect that and be somewhat quirky and disjointed simply because that's how my brain processes the rhythm. This is especially true if you're doing something like four bar groups with three measures of 4/4 followed by a measure of 7/8 - when you put the odd signature against something that feels more natural, so to speak, you'll be able to hear that sort of jumpy effect.

Don't know if any of that was clear, as again most of the way I hear these rhythms has to do with my own internal processing.
#5
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
would it be a good idea to just find the easy beats to keep track of and just play any duration of notes on it? like in 6/8 I can feel 2 down beats in each measure so should I just play anything as long as it is within the confines of the 2 beat count I feel? and can you do the same with other time sigs?

Yes. Many time signatures have their own kind of rhythm. It's easy to just play the same kind of rhythm all the time. Like in 6/8 or 12/8 it's like "shuffle 4/4". When I play in those signatures I play a lot of triplets (I'm thinking them as 2/4 or 4/4). It's pretty easy to "just play" if the drummer plays the same rhythm all the time. But if the time signature changes then it's really hard to improvise and sound good so then you should really think what you are going to play. So 6/8 is easy, so is 3/4. They have a regular beat so just think the 6/8 as 2/4 and play a lot of triplets (because if you play 16ths or 8ths it sounds pretty weird and it's pretty hard to play them over a triplet beat).
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#6
I don't exactly count whilst I solo, but I pay attention to the rhythm/riff/whatever I'm playing over, and make my soloing compliment it. After you get the feel and groove of the timing, you can begin to deviate from the riff somewhat, until you become even more comfortable. It's like anything with guitar playing. Practice, and you'll get it eventually.