#1
I used my whammy bar on my Stat MIM HSS the other day and when I finished gigging I realized the bridge had raised a bit. Now, I usually play in Eb but that day I played in E standard...

so I'm guessing that's the problem... but my question is.

It's lifted about 1 cm. I will be playing for quite some time in E standard so will my guitar end up harmed? Will I damage my guitar if I play with a slightly raised bridge?

BTW, I won't be using the trem bar for some time
#2
there will be no permanent problems, but your intonation and tuning stability might be a problem, if the raised trem really bothers you, you can put on lighter gauge strings or tighten the screws in your trem claw
#3
You're in a higher tuning, so you've got added tension on the bridge from the strings, you need to counter this.

1. Open up the trem cavity.
2. Tighten screws that hold the claw, or alternatively add an extra spring or two.

It won't damage the guitar playing it with a raised bridge though no, it might affect the action though. Quick and easy fix though.
#4
Yep tighten the springs to balance it out. Are you sure it's raised 1cm? That's quite a bit to be considered a slightly raised. Is your tremolo floating on two posts or is it connected to the face of the guitar with 6 screws?
#5
I would make sure to tighten the screws in the trem claw, just to make sure to get into the habit of doing things properly. Practicing technique is about doing things the proper way, shouldn't one make sure to do the same regarding guitar maintenance?
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#6
Quote by poppameth
Yep tighten the springs to balance it out. Are you sure it's raised 1cm? That's quite a bit to be considered a slightly raised. Is your tremolo floating on two posts or is it connected to the face of the guitar with 6 screws?



it's not 1 cm. It's less.

my string gauge is .10 - .52
#7
Quote by YYMMalmsteen
it's not 1 cm. It's less.

my string gauge is .10 - .52

Don't you like a strat with floating bridge? add another spring.
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Music student, Jazz/Classical/Prog
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#8
Frequent changing of tunings can be a pain with floating trems. If you intend to go back and forth between tunings a lot, you might want to consider blocking the trem so that it doesn't move. The best way to do this is inside the trem cavity, using wooden shims in front of and behind the "body" of the trem that the springs attach to.

An alternate flavor of this is to just lower the trem to the top surface of the guitar, and then tension up the springs so that they are never "overcome" by the string tension. But this approach means that would have a tougher time in restoring the trem to normal operation, later.