#1
Ok, I'm completely new to playing scales really fast with alternate picking, and I have begun practicing with the diminished scale. I've got a couple of questions:

1) do you think I should learn to alternate pick the pentatonic scale fast first? as it is two note per string whereas the diminished is 3 note per string

2) how long will it take do you think for me to reach the sort of speed of the guitarist (Vogg) playing the solo at 3:58 in this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kam8Ez-_N54

and please dont just say "just practice and it will come" I am practicing, dedicating alot of time every day to running up and down scales to increase speed, I'm just not seeing an improvement in speed so far. My friend thinks it;ll take like a year or something? thanks guys
Last edited by kerkhammet at Jan 13, 2012,
#2
practice 2 notes per string patterns in the diminished scale up and down, and oce you feel secure and comfortable playing it you can try to do 3 notes per string (stretchy) combined with string skipping.
How long it will take before you reach your goal can vary alot, depending on how much time and effort you are willing to put into this.
#3
There's a song where David Draiman of Disturbed rips a Dim7, which is when I started practicing it and incorperating it into my playing. It took me probably a month because of the type of picking I was using (It's an economy type of thing). I'm still not totally smooth on it

The song is Inside the Fire and the bit starts at 2:35. You can probably find a GP5 file here in the tabs, and you can just get Tuxguitar if you don't have the funds for the GP Program
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#4
Quote by kerkhammet
Ok, I'm completely new to playing scales really fast with alternate picking, and I have begun practicing with the diminished scale. I've got a couple of questions:

1) do you think I should learn to alternate pick the pentatonic scale fast first? as it is two note per string whereas the diminished is 3 note per string

2) how long will it take do you think for me to reach the sort of speed of the guitarist (Vogg) playing the solo at 3:58 in this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kam8Ez-_N54

and please dont just say "just practice and it will come" I am practicing, dedicating alot of time every day to running up and down scales to increase speed, I'm just not seeing an improvement in speed so far. My friend thinks it;ll take like a year or something? thanks guys


1 - No, practice what you intend to play. I mean that doesn't mean you should just leave picking pentatonics but if you want to use the diminished sound then practice that.

2 - It will take an indeterminate amount of time, there's no way of knowing.

It will take as long as it takes, but also you can't just grind the metronome and hot it'll work, you need to hit the metronome and practice with good technique and then it'll come in time.

Quote by bastards
There's a song where David Draiman of Disturbed rips a Dim7, which is when I started practicing it and incorperating it into my playing. It took me probably a month because of the type of picking I was using (It's an economy type of thing). I'm still not totally smooth on it

The song is Inside the Fire and the bit starts at 2:35. You can probably find a GP5 file here in the tabs, and you can just get Tuxguitar if you don't have the funds for the GP Program


Draiman's the vocalist The guitarist is Dan Donegan.
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#5
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Draiman's the vocalist The guitarist is Dan Donegan.


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I knew that!!!!!! I'm just testing you
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#6
Quote by kerkhammet
Ok, I'm completely new to playing scales really fast with alternate picking, and I have begun practicing with the diminished scale. I've got a couple of questions:

1) do you think I should learn to alternate pick the pentatonic scale fast first? as it is two note per string whereas the diminished is 3 note per string

2) how long will it take do you think for me to reach the sort of speed of the guitarist (Vogg) playing the solo at 3:58 in this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kam8Ez-_N54

and please dont just say "just practice and it will come" I am practicing, dedicating alot of time every day to running up and down scales to increase speed, I'm just not seeing an improvement in speed so far. My friend thinks it;ll take like a year or something? thanks guys

Don't.

Running up and down scales won't magically make you a better guitarist, it'll just make you faster at playing scales.

Like Zaphod says, practice what you want to play, or exercises that relate directly to what you want to play and have some practical application.
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#7
Quote by kerkhammet
1) do you think I should learn to alternate pick the pentatonic scale fast first? as it is two note per string whereas the diminished is 3 note per string

2) how long will it take do you think for me to reach the sort of speed of the guitarist (Vogg) playing the solo at 3:58 in this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kam8Ez-_N54

and please dont just say "just practice and it will come" I am practicing, dedicating alot of time every day to running up and down scales to increase speed, I'm just not seeing an improvement in speed so far. My friend thinks it;ll take like a year or something? thanks guys

It depends entirely on how much good practice you dedicate to playing fast scalar runs like that. Vogg is a very accomplished guitarist with a lot of playing under his belt. If you want to match that, you're going to have to devote a lot of time to getting up to that degree of accuracy and cleanliness.

It sounds like a 3 note per string pattern, very Malmsteen inspired. To acquire the speed you want with that kind of pattern, you'll want to practice 3 note per string patterns. I think I personally could reach that speed with a few hours of practice, since I've devoted a hella long time to alternate picking (I've been practicing it pretty intensely for a few years now). Considering you aren't me, I don't know how long it'll take you to reach that kind of speed and precision.

A couple of things I've found that are good for increasing your precision (and ultimately, speed) when alternate picking are as follows:
1. Focus on precision first. Precision is what enables you to play cleanly at any tempo, fast or slow.
2. Emphasize economy of motion when practicing. That means both how large your picking motions are and how much energy you put into them. Consequently, that also means learning to pick with minimal tension in your wrist and forearm, since tension is a wasteful use of energy that just so happens to also increase your risk of developing repetitive stress injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, and/or tendinitis.
3. Practice all sorts of different things with alternate picking. I found that when I practiced string skipping for a few weeks, my alternate picking in general improved pretty dramatically, since I'd been putting a lot of effort towards a technique that required very controlled, precise, and economical alternate picking.
4. With your fretting hand, get used to making smaller, more economical motions. I've had trouble in the past when I've ignored left hand technique in favor of right hand technique, which led to me hitting a metaphorical roadblock in speed, since I was limited by far-from-optimal left hand technique.

Those are the things that have improved my alternate picking. Like I said, I don't know your skill level or how well you learn through practice, so I can't really predict how long it'll take to reach that kind of speed. What I do know is that if you make those points a part of a scheduled, organized practice routine, you'll improve a lot faster than if you were to just noodle around for a while.