#1
Hey all,

So I'm lead guitarist in a band, and am at a bit of a brick wall - I have absolutely no confidence in my own ability to write solos, despite the fact that alot of people who have heard my band/solos have said that in terms of style I'm somewhere between Jimmy Page and Joe Perry - which is a big compliment as I love both those guys, how can I build confidence when actually writing solos? I always think they sound crap!

Thanks!
#2
No one else can do this for you, you have to get to this yourself. Maybe playing gigs and seeing people react to you who don't know you would help? Personally I dread the day I'm happy with my playing because it means I'll stop having things to work on...
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#3
The best thing you can do to gain some confidence when playing your solos is to write solos that you actually enjoy listening to; forget about mindless pentatonic wankery, just focus on melodic content. If you're not happy with the solo that you're writing, you're never going to play them confidently. Make every note count.
#4
just see the reaction of people you dont while you soloing if your doing a good job youll be able to tell
but confidence is something you build in yourself
and rememeber have fun with it and hit every single note like you mean it do rock faces if you have to \m/

Personally I dread the day I'm happy with my playing because it means I'll stop having things to work on...


me too
Last edited by supersac at Jan 13, 2012,
#5
Well, I'm not sure you were exactly clear on whether it was technical confidence or melodic confidence, so I'll offer some tips addressing both.

(1) Don't overplay- only write what you are capable of performing confidently with ease; (2) always put melodicism above technical showboating; (3) whatever you play, make sure it is well rehearsed to the point your can play it in your sleep.
#6
Quote by piszczel
The best thing you can do to gain some confidence when playing your solos is to write solos that you actually enjoy listening to; forget about mindless pentatonic wankery, just focus on melodic content. If you're not happy with the solo that you're writing, you're never going to play them confidently. Make every note count.


This. If you don't feel all of it you're not going to like it. I've written plenty of stuff that took me hours to make and ended up deleting all of it because I didn't feel like it contribute to the way I wanted to go with the song.
#7
just keep it for short so it stays interesting and keeps people wanting more. if u solo for 5 minutes it gets boring and everybody except maybe the 5 guitarists in the crowd want you to stop.
And the day you think ur music is awesome is the day your music will start to suck.
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#8
Dont worry about being to technical or theoretically advanced, just think about phrasing. Dont think you have to play in ever beat, or even every bar. Also, fit in the groove with the band. Even though you are not playing rhythm guitar, you still have to fit rhythmically whilst your soloing. If your perfectly in the rhythm, the odd wrong not wont sound so bad, and may not even be noticeable.
#9
Well I think it goes without saying to write something that you would like to listen to yourself. Confidence comes with being really sure on what your playing (if that makes sense). Just play natural and have fun, it takes time
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#10
Quote by Riffman15
(1) Don't overplay- only write what you are capable of performing confidently with ease;
(2) always put melodicism above technical showboating;
(3) whatever you play, make sure it is well rehearsed to the point your can play it in your sleep.


This is solid advice.
#11
Most non musicians have no idea if a solo is good or bad, so don't worry about what anybody else thinks. Have fun with it. Early performers are insecure about whether or not their work sucks anyway but the only way to know is to throw yourself out there. Confidence is a combination of experience and knowledge, but mostly experience, so keep at it.

If people are saying you sound like Page or Perry, and you still think you sound like crap, it's possible it's all in your head.