#1
an epiphone lp standard and gibson lp is made out of the same wood. i'm, not loioking for a fancy looking guitar just a good sound imitation. strip all the electronics out of the epiphone, replace the bridge and tuners. then put into better wiring, better toggle switch n stuff. would guitarcenter do this for me?
#2
Why not just do it yourself? It isn't that hard to figure out.
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#3
Quote by ProphetToJables
Why not just do it yourself? It isn't that hard to figure out.

i got school i dont have the time to do this.
#4
You can seriously do that in a couple of hours... surely you have time for that?
Gear
Highway One Tele (w/Custom Shop 51 Nocaster pickups)
Standard Tele (modded to Nashville specs)
Reverend Roundhouse

Orange Rockerverb 50 MKI
Vox AC4c1
Jet City JCA20H

And pedals!



"Shiva opens her arms now..
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#5
You could just save the money you'd spend on hardware, sell your Epi and pick up a used Gibson studio.
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#6
Quote by ehhthatguy
i got school i dont have the time to do this.


It wouldn't take that long. A whole weekend at the most. There are plenty of people on this site that can help you with what you need but not me because I'm as useful as a chocolate teapot.
There's a good chance that what I've written above is useless and if you take any of the advice it's your own fault.
#7
Quote by ehhthatguy
an epiphone lp standard and gibson lp is made out of the same wood. i'm, not loioking for a fancy looking guitar just a good sound imitation. strip all the electronics out of the epiphone, replace the bridge and tuners. then put into better wiring, better toggle switch n stuff. would guitarcenter do this for me?


Not even ****ing close. It is a good platform for upgrades however and I fully recommend upgrading the tuners, bridge, pickups, pots etc..

Guitar center will rape you for it, yes.

Btw what amp you using?


Quote by Silent Murder
It wouldn't take that long. A whole weekend at the most. There are plenty of people on this site that can help you with what you need but not me because I'm as useful as a chocolate teapot.


+1. Finished the same upgrades your planning on an old lp std I had in under a day.
Had a luthier put in the new nut though.
Last edited by StonedColdCrazy at Jan 13, 2012,
#8
Quote by ehhthatguy
an epiphone lp standard and gibson lp is made out of the same wood. i'm, not loioking for a fancy looking guitar just a good sound imitation. strip all the electronics out of the epiphone, replace the bridge and tuners. then put into better wiring, better toggle switch n stuff. would guitarcenter do this for me?


Gibsons are made from African mahogany.

Its arguable weather or not Epiphones (or any budget guitar for that matter) are even technically made of any mahogany. Never mind African.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 13, 2012,
#10
Quote by ehhthatguy
an epiphone lp standard and gibson lp is made out of the same wood.
No they're not. Not even close. And the wood is the most important part of the guitar's construction.

There's more to wood than simply 'mahogany' and 'rosewood'. There are many different species of wood that can be called 'mahogany' and the stuff Epiphone uses is not the same as the stuff that Gibson uses; the same goes for rosewood, ebony, maple, alder, ash - every wood used in guitars. Not to mention even within the same specieis you have higher and lower quality cuts of wood which effects the sound just as much as the species does. Then there's construction; you'll never find an Epiphone with a 1-piece body but they're fairly common on Gibsons.

Thinking that the most important parts of a guitar's sound and feel are the hardware and electronics is probably the most common and also the biggest mistake people make. The wood, and how that wood is treated and used, is far more imporatnt and it's also the element which varies the most.

I say this as someone who owns several Epiphones, several Gibsons, several Gibson copies form other brands and has done nearly every upgrade and modification to various guitars that you can think of: you can not turn a production Epiphone into a Gibson. The only Epiphones that come close are the ones from Japan (which cost almost as much as a Gibson does anyway and are very hard to track down). There is no pickup upgrade, no tuner upgrade, no bridge, nut, control pot, jack or anything else which will make an Epiphone sound or feel like a Gibson. The wood and the core construction simply is not up to the task. In fact in many ways the hardware htat Epiphone uses is already as good as if not better than the hardware on production Gibsons, so you shouldn't bother changing it anyway.

Also,
would guitarcenter do this for me?
Not likely. They'll install pickups for you but they're unlikely to do much else. Even if they do, they will charge a small fortune for it. It's a fale economy; by the time you've paid for the base guitar, the extra parts and paid for them to be installed for you, you'll have spent 90% of what the Gibson would have cost and it still won't sound or feel as good and a year or even six months down the road you'll still be wanting the Gibson.

Switching hardware, assuming you buy stuff that retrofits, takes all of half an hour. Switching out a toggle switch, control pots, jack and pickups takes an hour at most. There's no reason to ever be paying someone else to do that stuff for you. It's piss-eays to do yourself, takes next to no time, requires very little skill or knowledge and the only tools you need are a couple of standard size screwdrivers and a cheap soldering iron.


Believe me, I've been there. It is always - always - faster and cheaper in the end to just wait, save up and buy the guitar you really want first time around. Buying cheaper models and upgrading them and 'working your way up' the guitar ladder will always end up costing you more money and it will be longer before you get the guitar you really want. And you will always really want that Gibson.
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#11
anywhere you go to have this done for you is gonna cost a lot, ESPECIALLY guitar center,
do it yourself you might learn a little something
#12
Quote by XSamX
sell the epiphone and buy a gibson


+1. This is honestly your best choice if you aren't going to install the electronics yourself. The cost for the parts alone will set you back around 400, maybe more depending on what you get. Guitar center will charge a hefty labor fee as well (probably a couple hundred, maybe more.)

Learn to do it yourself, it's not hard or very time consuming.
#13
Quote by MrFlibble



Believe me, I've been there. It is always - always - faster and cheaper in the end to just wait, save up and buy the guitar you really want first time around. Buying cheaper models and upgrading them and 'working your way up' the guitar ladder will always end up costing you more money and it will be longer before you get the guitar you really want. And you will always really want that Gibson.



so true people trying to mod their cheap guitar end up selling at the end and lose big buck ..

same for amp .. people buy a crappy amp .. add pedals etc.. etc.. and in the end up with 1000 $ spend on crappy amps /pedals and sound nothing like a good tube amp they would have pay 1000 $

. save money .. buy quality gear right away .. in the long run .. if your not always selling your gear youll end up winner .


good luck .

buy quality gear so you wont have to upgraded everything or change in 1-2 year .

my philosophy now toward gear is i project 10 years before buying .. if it wont last me 10 years or close ot that .. i dont buy it .


thats the cure for G.A.S as well IMO unless you end up searching and searching .. buying .. reselling with lost etc..


i tried every cheap modeller out there ( peavy vypyr , behringer v-amp , rolan dcube etc .etc.. boutique pedals etc.. etc.. in the end i could have bought an axe-fx with the money i spend on that and wouldnt be searching for a decent sound .
i learned from my mistake .


save money and buy quality gear . that said .. doesnt mean Epiphone is a crappy brand .. the higher end epiphone will give you a good guitar for the money .

Gibson arent cheap .. thats a fact .. nearly 2000 $ .. thats a lot of money .. at least more than im ready to spend on a guitar .. but thats me .
Bedroom rock star :

- Gibson Les paul Standard 2001 Honeyburst .
- Agile 3200 Slim
Last edited by Skysc at Jan 13, 2012,
#15
Sound advice. I've done budget guitars with all kinds of upgrades and mods and had fun with 'em but once I got a custom made guitar I learned something. They sound much better and better made as well. Since then I never looked at another budget guitar. Now I have three custom made guitars (two in my sig).

Nevertheless budget guitars are great as they're made better than ever (even some from China) and will serve their purposes.
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#16
There was another thread like this so long ago.

It'll never be a Gibson, the point about would is nearly void as the QUALITY of the wood will not be as good, nor will the construction.

You'd be wasting money modding the Epi that you could save towards buying a REAL Gibson, or a PRS or anything else.
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#17
Quote by ehhthatguy
i got school i dont have the time to do this.

I got job I don't have the time either

First world problems lol
Actually called Mark!

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#18
I'm gonna go ahead and disagree with the people telling you to get a Gibson, unless your heart is set on having a Gibson Les Paul. They really aren't worth the money, and you get much more quality out of a PRS guitar of the same or lesser value. That said, if you're willing to pay the price for a Gibson Les Paul, sell your Epiphone and get a Gibson.
tl;dr Don't do the upgrade, and consider other brands unless you're sure you want a somewhat overpriced Les Paul.
#19
just have to argue your point on prs being better than gibsons, I know in my mind having played both what I personally feel on the subject, especially about the se's which are the only ones comparable in price to a gibson les paul studio. But to point out how many famous guitarists use gibson's, especially someone like hetfield who has various esp signature guitars, yet still has a lot of old gibsons he still continues to use live, I dont think their all wrong do you?

By all means to the OP try a PRS, you may find a lovely guitar and fall in love with it, and agree with everyone else the epi is always going to be a lower quality plank of wood no matter how much you spend on sticking gibson parts on it.
#20
Quote by ChamsRock
I'm gonna go ahead and disagree with the people telling you to get a Gibson, unless your heart is set on having a Gibson Les Paul. They really aren't worth the money, and you get much more quality out of a PRS guitar of the same or lesser value. That said, if you're willing to pay the price for a Gibson Les Paul, sell your Epiphone and get a Gibson.
tl;dr Don't do the upgrade, and consider other brands unless you're sure you want a somewhat overpriced Les Paul.



Where do you get this info? The cheapest real PRS's like the Mira are $1800-1900 (the Price of a Gibson Traditional) and when you get into the middle of PRs lines you're easily into Gibson price ranges. I'd hazard a guess you're one of those people who looks at the Gibson website and assumes their listed MSRP is what they sell for. Gibsons actually sell normally for around 60% of their MSRP and better vendors even cheaper.
Moving on.....
#21
all im saying is that, the epiphone lp and gibson lp use the same wood. its the same frame. if you put the same wiring ,pickups , bridge etc on the gibson frame it would sound like an epiphone. but if u put higher qaulity electronics on the epiphone it would sound much better.
#22
Quote by ehhthatguy
all im saying is that, the epiphone lp and gibson lp use the same wood. its the same frame. if you put the same wiring ,pickups , bridge etc on the gibson frame it would sound like an epiphone. but if u put higher qaulity electronics on the epiphone it would sound much better.


You're not listening to the replies are you

They don't use the same wood. Gibson uses higher grade mahogany, actual maple tops instead of veneers, and they use less pieces. Epiphone guitars use low grade mahogany, it's a whole bunch of pieces glued together. gibsons also glue pieces together, but we're talking the difference between 3 and 10. their maple tops are like 3mm thick at the most.

I won't however bash upgrading an epiphone, i've swapped out the hardware and electronics on mine and it's a great instrument. But you just can't turn a corolla into a cadillac.
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#23
Quote by ehhthatguy
all im saying is that, the epiphone lp and gibson lp use the same wood. its the same frame. if you put the same wiring ,pickups , bridge etc on the gibson frame it would sound like an epiphone. but if u put higher qaulity electronics on the epiphone it would sound much better.

The wood is not the same, and normally, I wouldn't make such a big deal about wood on most guitars, but the wood on a les paul matters. Les pauls can get muddy very easily if you're not careful. It's the difference between a les paul that sounds flat, sterile, and muddy and one that sounds vibrant and clear. When I first started college, I had an Epiphone les paul standard that was completely unusable in the neck position, no matter what pickup I stuck in there. It ALWAYS sounded like it had a blanket over it.

Besides, what exactly are you going to do? Pay $200-$300 for pickups, $50 for a new wiring harness and then pay GC $100 to install it all for you? At that price, you might as well sell the Epiphone, pool that money together and buy one of those Gibson '60s tributes, which are one of the best values out right now.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 14, 2012,
#24
Quote by ehhthatguy
an epiphone lp standard and gibson lp is made out of the same wood.


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#25
for one, you just dont switch out electronics, pickups, switches, etc in an hour or two, especially if you have no soldering experience. Now, that being said, I have done that to a epiphone les paul custom. I put new quality electronics, pots, toggle switch, and seymour duncan pickups hoping to make a great backup to my Gibson LP. Well, even doing all of that work, it still doesnt compare really with my Gibson LP standard. I am trying to like it and trying but I am fooling myself. It will never be close to a GIbson even with all that done to it. Bottom line, you can get a Gibson studio for the price you pay for a Epi LP plus new electronics, pots, toggles, pickups, and labor if you dont do it yourself. Save yourself the trouble
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Last edited by madh4ttr at Jan 14, 2012,