#1
So there's the obvious intro, verse, chorus, prechorus, solo, outro etc which i understand.

But what exactly are things like: interlude, bridge, breakdown etc?
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#2
Does it matter?
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#3
Quote by ChemicalFire
Does it matter?


+1

structure your song thematically rather than relying on categorical terms. the chorus is really all you'd need to know about, but there are plenty of songs that don't have choruses, either.
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#4
Quote by Hail
+1

structure your song thematically rather than relying on categorical terms. the chorus is really all you'd need to know about, but there are plenty of songs that don't have choruses, either.


How can I rely on them if I don't even know what they are?

It might not matter and I'm not trying to somehow use this terms into song writing, but there must be some reason a breakdown is different from an interlude and I just want to know what exactly the difference is..
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#5
Not really. A breakdown is a kind of interlude. Then again so is anything that you don't mark as a chorus or verse.

There are no rules in song writing. I could label my interlude on my notes as:

"In which the fish shall rise from the sea and steal all my cucumbers"

And it wouldn't make a blind bit of difference, see where I'm coming from?
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



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Last edited by ChemicalFire at Jan 13, 2012,
#6
Quote by cccp2006
How can I rely on them if I don't even know what they are?

you can't, that's why i didn't answer your question.

It might not matter and I'm not trying to somehow use this terms into song writing, but there must be some reason a breakdown is different from an interlude and I just want to know what exactly the difference is..


why?

e: ****ing god CF how do you do this
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#7
Cuz I'm magic
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#8
Very well, If by asking a simple question I somehow offended some of you, then perhaps I don't need to know the answer to my question and we can all forget that this thread exists.
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#9
I'm not offended. I'm just trying in my own special way to point out that you're placing too much emphasis on what things are called instead of writing awesome music. Using the terms verse and chorus tend to limit what you do, because you feel you need these things, but in reality you don't.

Unless you're looking to write pop music, in which case the Intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, interlude, chorus x 2 , outro formula works perfectly.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#10
Quote by ChemicalFire
I'm not offended. I'm just trying in my own special way to point out that you're placing too much emphasis on what things are called instead of writing awesome music. Using the terms verse and chorus tend to limit what you do, because you feel you need these things, but in reality you don't.

Unless you're looking to write pop music, in which case the Intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, interlude, chorus x 2 , outro formula works perfectly.


or in less subtle cases, chorusx50
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You win. I'm done here.
#11
Quote by cccp2006

But what exactly are things like: interlude, bridge, breakdown etc?


A bridge is a section which occurs usually once or twice in a song which has different melodic content from the verse or the chorus.

Examples of bridges might be the part that goes with the lyrics "You're asking me will my love grow ... " in the Beatles "Something." That's a good example of a song which doesn't have a chorus and has the basic structure verse verse bridge verse.

In U2's "One" you might call the bridge the part which goes with the lyrics "Love is the temple, love the higher law, lover is the temple, love the higher law." That song goes verse chorus verse chorus verse chorus bridge chorus.

James Brown's "Get Up" is an easy one to hear because he tells you he's taking it to the bridge before he takes it to the bridge.

A breakdown is usually a rhythmic figure, that usually features the everyone except the rhythm section stopping playing, while the bass and drums (although sometimes other sections, too) do something complex which leads back to the top of a verse or chorus.

A great example of this is "Funky Drummer" from James Brown. The drum break is very famous, you've probably heard it sampled a dozen times.

I'm not used to "interlude" as a formal term in the same way as those other words, although that may be my own ignorance. I would probably use the word interlude to describe a section of the song which was different from the verse or the chorus which didn't have much in the way of melodic content (which would make it a bridge) or rhythmic content (which would make it a breakdown). The part in Spinal Tap's "Stonehenge" when the midgets dance around is an interlude. (Not the greatest example, but that example is sending up something you see a lot the late 70s metal they're sending up).

With all due respect to ChemicalFire, I think that these words have meanings and it's useful, if you're going to talk to other musicians, to know what they're talking about and to be able to refer to parts of songs by words they'll understand. You shouldn't be slaves to these concepts compositionally but you should understand what they usually mean and why people use them.