#1
Hey all,

I've been trying to write a chord progression in C lydian, but I can't really get it to sound modal.

From what I understand, #4th and the Maj.7th are the flavour tones of this mode. In C, that would be the F# and B that become the flavour tones then...

To begin with I thought I'll start off with the 1 chord, Cmaj. Every progression I tried with this didnt quite sound right (maybe I wasn't using the correct voicings).

After messing about for a while this is the progression I arrived at:

Cmaj (add 9), Em9, F#m b5, Gmaj

Try as I might, I cant get this thing to resolve on C. Every lick I play in my head seems to want to resolve to G. I realize that C lydian and G major scales have the same notes so I'm obviously doing something wrong. Can you guys help me figure this out?
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#2
Your chord progression is in G, since everything wants to resolve back to it.

In order to get C to be the tonic you have to use a two chord vamp that firmly establishes C as "home base" while also highlighting the color tone of the mode. With modes it's important to keep things static (hence the two chord vamp) because if your progression starts "moving" then it will default to tonality.

Alternatively, you could use a constant C drone, either by itself or within the vamp itself.
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Last edited by rockingamer2 at Jan 14, 2012,
#3
The F#mb5 kills you in this one, because that's a dominant function chord of G and so will always pull to G. Do what was said above and set up a little vamp that alternates between two or three chords that feature a lot of Cs with some F#s thrown in. Be careful though, because the F#-C interval sets up a dominant function to G (it wants to resolve to G-B).
#6
Quote by hitman_47
Hey all,

I've been trying to write a chord progression in C lydian, but I can't really get it to sound modal.

From what I understand, #4th and the Maj.7th are the flavour tones of this mode. In C, that would be the F# and B that become the flavour tones then...

To begin with I thought I'll start off with the 1 chord, Cmaj. Every progression I tried with this didnt quite sound right (maybe I wasn't using the correct voicings).

After messing about for a while this is the progression I arrived at:

Cmaj (add 9), Em9, F#m b5, Gmaj

Try as I might, I cant get this thing to resolve on C. Every lick I play in my head seems to want to resolve to G. I realize that C lydian and G major scales have the same notes so I'm obviously doing something wrong. Can you guys help me figure this out?

it doesnt sound modal because it isnt. modal songs, TRUE modal songs, do not have progressions. 2 chords tops. anything more than that can be explained with accidentals, chord borrowing, etc...
#8
C - D7/C

But why limit yourself to that when you can do

C - D7/C - G/B - Dm7/C - Ab, G7b5

Sounds like you just want to write in lydian for the sake of it to sound all clever because your using modes, but you're just going to end up restricting yourself.
#9
Quote by griffRG7321
C - D7/C

But why limit yourself to that when you can do

C - D7/C - G/B - Dm7/C - Ab, G7b5

Sounds like you just want to write in lydian for the sake of it to sound all clever because your using modes, but you're just going to end up restricting yourself.


No need to be insulting. His question was polite, reasonable and well-worded. You don't know his reasons for wanting to write in Lydian. As if he needed to justify it to you anyway.
#10
Quote by Jehannum
No need to be insulting. His question was polite, reasonable and well-worded. You don't know his reasons for wanting to write in Lydian. As if he needed to justify it to you anyway.


That wasn't insulting, it was an observation.
#11
Quote by griffRG7321
C - D7/C

But why limit yourself to that when you can do

C - D7/C - G/B - Dm7/C - Ab, G7b5

Sounds like you just want to write in lydian for the sake of it to sound all clever because your using modes, but you're just going to end up restricting yourself.


I want to write in lydian to get used to modes and more importantly, get the modal feel for it. Im indian, and we have a lot of modal music which is progression based that sounds absolutely beautiful, so its something I want to be able to figure out. The dorian feel is something I 'get' but not so with the other modes. I think perhaps I can use the melody to hold it together. Alternatively I could just use the lydian mode to solo over a progression in c, but I want to stay away from that.
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.

#13
Forgive me for being daft, but I thought traditional Indian music wasn't entirely compatible with Western music theory.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#14
Quote by AlanHB
Forgive me for being daft, but I thought traditional Indian music wasn't entirely compatible with Western music theory.


It isn't really, it does have variations that dont quite fit into the framework. What I want to do is get the 'sound' and 'feel' of the mode in my head.

If nothing else, think of it as an academic exercise I'm trying to get my head around and need help in, thats all.
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.