#1
Hi,
I've been looking at getting a Gibson _____ studio 60s tribute and I just want to know what the difference is between the Sg and les Paul (other than shape and weight of course) cos my local store and also thomann sell the les Paul for almost $250 more and I want to know why. I also already have a les Paul so it'd be awesome to have an Sg in my arsenal but I want to know if there's any difference in quality.

Thanks

BTW, what does tl:dr mean?
#4
i dont think theres much of a difference but more that a lp is more expensive ot make as it has a top on it and is more wood

also a lp is much more popular than an sg so that proabaly bumped up th eprice abit
#6
Lp=more wood&more popularity.=250$ more than the SG.
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#7
Lp=more wood&more popularity.=250$ more than the SG.
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#8
Lp=more wood&more popularity.=250$ more than the SG.
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#9
Lp=more wood&more popularity.=250$ more than the SG.
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2. You're browsing through the UG forums.
3. You're reading now.
5. You didn't notice that there was no #4.
6. You just checked it.
7. Now you're having a lil smile.

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#10
Quote by Kozlic
Lp=more wood&more popularity.=250$ more than the SG.

Nice spam. Anyway, it's just not more wood & more popularity.

There is also a tone difference. There was a thread like this back a few months ago and if I remember right, Jesus Crisp shared some of his wisdom there.

I know that Studio's of today have chambered bodies (I don't mind it personally. Actually, better for my back [And I'm only 20]) so it can be hard to compare a SG standard with LP Studio, but they're still both all-mahogany with rosewood fretboard and same pickups.

But I tried them both at the local guitar shop with both Blackstar HT Club 40 and Fender Hot Rod Deluxe (40 watt too, just not so heavy metal). To me, the sound of the SG was a bit thinner, but also.. More aggressive. It seriously had more of that say "rock n' roll attitude" packed in it than the Les Paul. However, to me, the LP's sound was a little bit more fuller while playing chords and perhaps a little bit more warmth in the sound while using the neck pickup.

So, what my opinion is, they're both great guitars for the price, but I wouldn't go for SG. I like my LP more.
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#11
Well, given the fact that Les Paul didn't like the SG and asked his nameplate to be removed from the new guitar, there should be some differences. And, if you play on the respective two guitars, you discover these differences pretty quickly.
First of all, SG was intended as a weapon against Fender Stratocaster, who was driving rock players away from Gibson. So it's mainly a lead guitar and a rock machine. It has a much slimmer neck and body (hence a brighter sound) and easier access to the 22nd fret. Its cleans aren't so rich in harmonics and, generally speaking, its sound is more cutting-edge and agressive. Due to slimmer neck (replaced on many models by a thicker one or by a 2-truss rod system with carbon), the SG goes out of tune if you push the neck too hard when soloing.
But, on the other hand, as any Gibson, it plays well music like Blues or Jazz.
The SG Studio tribute is so cheap because of the finish (lacking some costly details, like neck binding and trapeze inlays) and also because of the two P90s, not favored by everybody, and also noisy, no hum-cancelling in middle position. Many players don't appreciate these features, although they are historically correct, hence the price is lower.
#12
Quote by rv_phoenix
easier access to the 22nd fret.

While that is true, I hope you're not saying that it's hard to access the 22nd fret of a LP.
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Quote by Cathbard
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#13
The core difference between an SG and an LP is the tone, especially at the neck pickup. Assuming the pickups, strings and amp settings are all the same, an SG's tone will have stronger mids and a little less bass; the focused mids also means the treble can seem a little weaker. The bridge pickup sounds a little bit darker than the bridge pickup of a Les Paul, but the neck pickup often sounds considerably brighter and thinner. The Les Paul is obviously the opposite to this: it has a more even tone and a darker and thicker neck pickup and a brighter and thinner bridge pickup. Les Pauls also tend to have slightly better sustain but they do also tend to weigh more; that's just what happens when you have a guitar body with more mass.

The control layout is also slightly different (the toggle switch on a LP is above the pickups while on an SG it's below), the jack is in a different place (on the side for a LP, on the front of the guitar for the SG) and of course the upper fret access is better on an SG.

The big problems to look out for with each are that the Les Paul can be too heavy for some people to comfortably play for long periods of time and many people find it hard to play on the higher frets; the SG's main problem is that they are almost always very neck-heavy and unbalanced, since the body is so thin.
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#14
Quote by Sakke
While that is true, I hope you're not saying that it's hard to access the 22nd fret of a LP.

Although English language isn't my native language, I guess I've expressed myself correctly: I've said "easier". Access to LP's 22nd fret might be not difficult, but access to SGs 22nd fret is easier. That's obvious for everybody. Easier means a comparison with something that must not necessarily be difficult.
#15
Reading this, I actually think that I'd rather an sg seeing as I have a les Paul already and I put p90s in it once and they lacked the bite on the les Paul that people are saying that the Sg has. I'll probably get a set of Seymour Duncan stacked p90s to cancel the hum.
#17
Construction-wise:

The SG is definately lighter and thinner.
Because of the thinner body, the guitar is also a bit neck-heavy, which might or might not be a big issue to you. When sitting down I personally don't have a problem with it and when standing up, a broader leather strap will help to get a good balance.
The upper fret access on the SG is great, I don't know many other guitar shapes which make it so easy to play even the highest frets.
Also the SG seems kind of more ergonomic than a Les Paul.

The Les Paul is thicker, therefore heavier, I sometimes find them a bit body-heavy. When standing up, the thicker body makes the guitar seem a bit further away from your body, but that's not a big issue, at least to me.
The upper fret access is not the greatest, but unless you play a lot on the really high frets, this shouldn't be a huge issue. And it's not like you couldn't get up there at all.


Tone-wise:

Les Pauls are a big block of mahogany with a maple top. This gives you a warm, fat bottom and mids from the mahogany and a good amount of highs from the maple top (only if it's an actual top which Gibsons have and not a thin veneer like the ones many Epiphones, Schecter, etc. have). This wood-combination gives Les Pauls a fat but still cutting tone.
Because of the thicker body and single cutaway Les Pauls also tend to have more sustain than SGs.

The SG on the other hand is a rather thin plank of mahogany, which gives it a very middy, but still warm tone. Many people say SGs are rather bright sounding instruments, but I think that's not quite the truth. What people often hear as highs are in fact high mids. Because of the lack of a maple top it actually has less highs, but also less lows due to the thinner body, than a Les Paul.
The "SGs are really bright sounding guitars" might be mostly due to Angus Young, whom most people instantly identify SGs with, and his bright Marshall tone.
Overall they aren't as fat and warm sounding as Les Pauls, but they have very nice, useable tones as well.
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#18
Quote by JesusCrisp
Long, well thought out, and well educated post.

Couldn't have put it better myself.
#20
Thanks, I just wanted to know if there was any difference in quality. I'll be getting the SH then I guess.
#21
Quote by rv_phoenix
Although English language isn't my native language, I guess I've expressed myself correctly: I've said "easier". Access to LP's 22nd fret might be not difficult, but access to SGs 22nd fret is easier. That's obvious for everybody. Easier means a comparison with something that must not necessarily be difficult.

Yes, but speaking in comparison can be connected with advertising. You can't use "best", but you can use "better".
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Quote by Cathbard
Bugera cloning Blackstar is a scandal cloaked in a tragedy making love to a nightmare.

#22
Quote by itamar100
Thanks, I just wanted to know if there was any difference in quality. I'll be getting the SH then I guess.

In terms of quality: not really.

But SGs are less work to make than Les Pauls, that's why Les Pauls are generally more expensive.
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#23
Quote by MrFlibble
The core difference between an SG and an LP is the tone, especially at the neck pickup. Assuming the pickups, strings and amp settings are all the same, an SG's tone will have stronger mids and a little less bass; the focused mids also means the treble can seem a little weaker. The bridge pickup sounds a little bit darker than the bridge pickup of a Les Paul, but the neck pickup often sounds considerably brighter and thinner. The Les Paul is obviously the opposite to this: it has a more even tone and a darker and thicker neck pickup and a brighter and thinner bridge pickup. Les Pauls also tend to have slightly better sustain but they do also tend to weigh more; that's just what happens when you have a guitar body with more mass.

The control layout is also slightly different (the toggle switch on a LP is above the pickups while on an SG it's below), the jack is in a different place (on the side for a LP, on the front of the guitar for the SG) and of course the upper fret access is better on an SG.

The big problems to look out for with each are that the Les Paul can be too heavy for some people to comfortably play for long periods of time and many people find it hard to play on the higher frets; the SG's main problem is that they are almost always very neck-heavy and unbalanced, since the body is so thin.

Listen to this, TS - Flibble isn't full of hot air for once.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#24
Quote by Kozlic
Lp=more wood&more popularity.=250$ more than the SG.


But Gibsons best selling guitar is the SG how does that make the LP more popular?

Normal standard SG's don't really suffer too bad from this neck dive crap that everyone bangs on about. If you go for a 60's style design or an Epiphone G400 then you will get quite bad neck dive but you can stop it happening anyway with a leather strap with a rough underside.
It's whatever feels and sounds good to you that matters, I prefer SG's, LP's look nice but I find them uncomfortable.
#25
Quote by JesusCrisp

Tone-wise:

Les Pauls are a big block of mahogany with a maple top. This gives you a warm, fat bottom and mids from the mahogany and a good amount of highs from the maple top (only if it's an actual top which Gibsons have and not a thin veneer like the ones many Epiphones, Schecter, etc. have). This wood-combination gives Les Pauls a fat but still cutting tone.
Because of the thicker body and single cutaway Les Pauls also tend to have more sustain than SGs.
.


Alright, JesusCrisp, my only question is, and forgive me for being a Devil's Advocate/maybe a complete asshole, but if a LP has more lows, mids and highs, wouldn't that mean it's just louder? Isn't frequency response usually in relation to other frequency ranges?
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


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#26
It's just generally a fuller sound. SGs are very mid heavy but don't have as much top or low end as a Les Paul, so the mid frequencies tend to be even more pronounced.

At least, that's what I think he was getting at.

I find LPs to be more balanced and SGs to be punchy.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#27
Quote by kangaxxter
Alright, JesusCrisp, my only question is, and forgive me for being a Devil's Advocate/maybe a complete asshole, but if a LP has more lows, mids and highs, wouldn't that mean it's just louder? Isn't frequency response usually in relation to other frequency ranges?


What bubb_tubbs said:

It's just generally a fuller sound. SGs are very mid heavy but don't have as much top or low end as a Les Paul, so the mid frequencies tend to be even more pronounced.

At least, that's what I think he was getting at.

I find LPs to be more balanced and SGs to be punchy.
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#28
I am such a spoilt brat...

I say...

Gibson Studio, No.
Gibson Standard, No.
Gibson Custom Shop Standard... F**k yes.
Gibson VOS ... I want one of those, pref a sunburst LP one.
Vintage Gibson guitars worth more than my house... You better believe that's a want.
Last edited by treborillusion at Jan 15, 2012,