#1
Would you feel okay having a house engineer record your album? I'm supposed to my going out of town to record my album (recording starts in late February) and I'll be recording to analog tape, just me and this house engineer.

The place is a respectable, local studio in Chicago and it's $25/hour for the house engineer. How can I make the best of all of this before I actually go in to record?
#2
To make the best out of it, you have to make sure you are absolutely ready. Practice practice practice. So when the time comes you can play it once and get this thing over with, and save yourself some precious time & money. Also, I'd recommend you to go there before he comes, so you can configure your settings with the local equipment etc.
#3
What place? I just recorded an EP with a house engineer in chicago pretty much the same way, and it came out well.
#4
Quote by eyalcisv
To make the best out of it, you have to make sure you are absolutely ready. Practice practice practice. So when the time comes you can play it once and get this thing over with, and save yourself some precious time & money. Also, I'd recommend you to go there before he comes, so you can configure your settings with the local equipment etc.

This is the most important. Know what you want (tone, timbre, etc) out of the recording, and try to be as articulate as possible. If you can get things to run smoothly, it can range from painless to pretty fun.
#5
discuss what your looking for, have an idea of where you want your song to go, have references in sounds you want, have a song map for him (ie. Intro, 6 bars, verse 1, 20 bars, etc), that can be very important in the mixing/editing stage.


Having recorded people myself, having as much info as I can about what I'm trying to do is awesome, the more the better. His picture of what you want and what's in your mind could be completely different, which is why you need to have some of this stuff to relay what your trying to do.