#1
Hi there,

On my Les Paul junior, everytime the pick misses the pickguard and hits the finish, it leaves a small scratch on the finish that is only visible when light shines down on it (i.e when in a playing position),

Is there any way that I can avoid it, or get rid of the scratches?


Thanks,


Oli
#2
Don't miss?

Pick swirls/scratches are common. As long as you're not gouging the piss out of the finish through to the wood, I wouldn't worry about it.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#3
Quote by bubb_tubbs
Don't miss?

Pick swirls/scratches are common. As long as you're not gouging the piss out of the finish through to the wood, I wouldn't worry about it.


It seems a lot more prone to scratches, though - I used to miss all the time on my strat and it never got scrated; but it is a completely different story on the LP Jr..
#4
Your LP Jr may have nitrocellulose finish on it (depends what model) which is softer than the poly finish on Strats and most other guitars.

I can write my name in my Custom Shop's finish with my fingernail if I try, but it buffs off when I polish it.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#5
don't miss.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
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#6
Don't worry too much, paint is just paint. If it REALLY bothers you, you can do a new paint job, but that's kind of expensive. I guess you can wax it again so everything will shine instead of just the scratches.
Go to your local music shop. Maybe the have a bigger pickguard. If not, I'm sure they can wax it for you.
#7
^ Don't wax nitro. Get a proper guitar polish and use that to smooth out the finish.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#8
Swirl/Scratch remover might work. Just polish it on with a buffer and small scratches will be removed. Works like a charm!
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#9
unless you're really flailing around with your hand when playing causing your hand to go way past the guard(??), the only place I could see hitting the guitar is where the strings are. If so, you're digging in too deep when picking & strumming.
Moving on.....
#10
Quote by bubb_tubbs
^ Don't wax nitro. Get a proper guitar polish and use that to smooth out the finish.

Why? Nitro waxes up just fine as long as it is old enough that all remaining solvents are gone (i.e. it's cured). I have painted many cars and motorcycles over the years in nitro, and the only problems occur when you start applying finishing type products before it has fully cured. True nitro is very hard to come by these days, but back in the 70's it wasn't. Show vehicles were done with it. Acrylic lacquer replaced it, and it handles much the same.

To the OP - you can get transparent, static cling sheets that you can cut and apply to your guitar to protect it. You see them occasionally in the Flamenco world. The set I have is out of Japan, and called Guitar Guard.
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Last edited by Vulcan at Jan 14, 2012,
#12
Quote by Vulcan
Why? Nitro waxes up just fine as long as it is old enough that all remaining solvents are gone (i.e. it's cured). I have painted many cars and motorcycles over the years in nitro, and the only problems occur when you start applying finishing type products before it has fully cured. True nitro is very hard to come by these days, but back in the 70's it wasn't. Show vehicles were done with it. Acrylic lacquer replaced it, and it handles much the same.

It took a long time before I found polishes that didn't leave horrible film on the R8's finish but waxes were among the worst offenders.

Maybe it's just the VOS.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#13
Quote by bubb_tubbs
It took a long time before I found polishes that didn't leave horrible film on the R8's finish but waxes were among the worst offenders.

Maybe it's just the VOS.


I think that the problem may be that newer polymer waxes don't 'breathe' properly for nitro, either. An auto finish supply store, such as UAP can help you with one intended for lacquer, or get a pure carnauba furniture wax.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#14
I use either 'Gibson pump polish for Nitro' for periodic restoration of the finish (it has some lacquer in it) or Virtuoso cleaner & polish. The latter, took my VOS R7 to a Gloss!
Moving on.....