#1
Anyone got any experience on this? Any stories to share?

Brought my guitar to a luthier to ask about swapping out the licensed floyd for an Original. He took some measurements and it seems that everything is comparable except for the sustain block. He measured mine at 30mm and the OFR block is listed as 37mm.

He explained to me the possible downsides to this but basically said the only way to know for sure would be to buy an OFR and try and install it.

The guitar in question is a Dean from Hell Dime signature.

I came across a site where you can buy custom floyd rose parts but 159 dollars is a lot to pay for a titanium 32mm (which is the closest size they had) sustain block.

Anyone have any thoughts or experienced something similar? Would the extra 7mm really make that much of a difference?

Thanks in advance, apologies for the long post.
#2
Titanium blocks are just a fad, brass or steel is where its at as the added mass help sustain and gives a warmer tone.

The difference could mean that your sustain block sticks out too far to put the back cover on, or maybe sticks out of the body altogether.

When you take the back panel off you can measure between the bottom of the sustain block and the back of your guitar to work out how much room you have..
#3
Quote by sic6505+
Titanium blocks are just a fad, brass or steel is where its at as the added mass help sustain and gives a warmer tone.

The difference could mean that your sustain block sticks out too far to put the back cover on, or maybe sticks out of the body altogether.

When you take the back panel off you can measure between the bottom of the sustain block and the back of your guitar to work out how much room you have..


What the luthier said to me was the added length might affect the way the strings connect to the block and it might actually affect the instrument regaining proper pitch.

I'm guessing 2mm wouldn't have such a huge affect?

Edit - Can you comment on the difference between brass/copper? Copper seems to be more expensive.

Can't find much by googling
Last edited by Mad-Mardegan at Jan 14, 2012,
#5
Quote by Wisthekiller
Copper is pretty soft. Not sure about brass though.


Thought that might be the case.
#6
Not sure what he could have meant about it affecting the strings as they are clamped to the saddles, the saddles bolt to the baseplate and the baseplate bolts to the sustain block.

Its also possible that you could swap the sustain block from your licensed floyd to the new original but you would need someone with more floyd experience to confirm that.
#7
Quote by sic6505+
Not sure what he could have meant about it affecting the strings as they are clamped to the saddles, the saddles bolt to the baseplate and the baseplate bolts to the sustain block.

Its also possible that you could swap the sustain block from your licensed floyd to the new original but you would need someone with more floyd experience to confirm that.


I asked him that and he said if the holes line up that it is a possibility but that it would take away a lot of the pros of upgrading the system in the first place.

I've been looking on www.floydupgrades.com and there seems to be some great reviews of the 32mm brass blocks they sell. Might be something worth looking in to.
#9
Quote by Mad-Mardegan
Thought that might be the case.

They're both soft...(Softer than titanium anyway) the issue is their weight and density... More dense, heavy metal gives the string more to anchor to, creating more sustain... I seriously doubt you'd notice a difference..

7mm equates to just over a 1/4 Inch... should be pretty easy to measure whether you have enough space for it.
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#10
The strings never touches the block on a Floyd guys, that has nothing to do with sustain. More mass adds a barely noticable amount of sustain, the biggest difference between the stock steel block and a brass one is tone. Brass blocks make the guitar sound alot warmer becasue the metal is much softer and slows the vibrations where as steel transmits energy very fast and gives a brighter sound. A steel block the same size as those big block brass ones would give a fair more sustain but have a very brittle sound to it.

TS should be fine with the stock 37mm block since there tends to be alot of wasted space inside the cavity and the block never comes close to the cover plate anyway. At most he would just need to keep the plate off.
I play Lacrosse, you should too
Quote by reeses
heed this man's suggestion, for he is wise.

Aww shucks...

Quote by Tom 1.0
Oh and wait for the Schecter fan boys, if you listen real hard you can already hear them coming.
#11
Quote by Metalfan41
The strings never touches the block on a Floyd guys, that has nothing to do with sustain. More mass adds a barely noticable amount of sustain, the biggest difference between the stock steel block and a brass one is tone. Brass blocks make the guitar sound alot warmer becasue the metal is much softer and slows the vibrations where as steel transmits energy very fast and gives a brighter sound. A steel block the same size as those big block brass ones would give a fair more sustain but have a very brittle sound to it.

TS should be fine with the stock 37mm block since there tends to be alot of wasted space inside the cavity and the block never comes close to the cover plate anyway. At most he would just need to keep the plate off.

Hmmmm I thoght denser wood gave more sustain why wouldnt denser metal do the same??? And I guess you have never had the trem claw or springs catch a belt,belt loop or a shirt ect.... no trem cavity cover is a dumb idea. otherwise they wouldnt have them in the first place.
What the hell!!!
#12
Thanks for the responses folks, the luthier I'm dealing with said that a brass 32mm block should be perfect
#13
Quote by danvwman
Hmmmm I thoght denser wood gave more sustain why wouldnt denser metal do the same??? And I guess you have never had the trem claw or springs catch a belt,belt loop or a shirt ect.... no trem cavity cover is a dumb idea. otherwise they wouldnt have them in the first place.

Dense woods have more mass and are usually very hard, that's why they give more sustain. Dense metal won't necessarily do the same. Lead and gold are both very dense but very soft and won't transfer vibrations well. You need a metal that's reasonably hard, like steel or brass, to have the mass translate to more sustain. But as I said before, it hardly makes a difference sustain wise.

And for the cavity cover, I always take them off my guitars and have never had a problem with it. Most people take them off anyway because it saves time during string changes.
I play Lacrosse, you should too
Quote by reeses
heed this man's suggestion, for he is wise.

Aww shucks...

Quote by Tom 1.0
Oh and wait for the Schecter fan boys, if you listen real hard you can already hear them coming.
#14
I've done that, LOVE that bridge, the orginal floyd rose trem with locking nut to match... the action just feels nice, and if you can, have it 'floating'
#15
We make upgrades for over 21 styles of Rock blocks and can custom make any style or brand we don't currently stock.
#16
That's great to hear as the poor guy hasn't been able to play his guitar for three and a half years
#17
Adam Riever (floyd upgrades guy) told me in the customer support years ago that pretty much you want to shove a ruler inside the guitar with the tremolo still in and see how long the block is. The only thing bad that can happen is if it's too long , for call of duty or any gun enthusiasts think about it sort of like you see an automatic pistol with an extended magazine. It'll work great but look kind of funny.

go brass , I'd love to know about coppers sound
the L shaped block if it can fit go with it, you get a little more brass so more sustain, volume and tone

other upgrades to consider
the tremolo arm that has an allen key built in
the EVH D-tuna - you can go to a dropped tuning in seconds , it doesn't work just for drop D either

alternatives some other companies make are, stone (expensive) or tungsten , tungsten also goes by wolfram and it has the same density as gold. Tungsten they used to use to spray gold and pass it off as real bullions (bricks) of gold.

I like brass a lot and it totally brought my guitar to life. It's only 30-40$ it could be worst like re-wiring a guitar and installing two hand wound pickups by bare knuckle or whatever fad company all the kids are talking about by a professional guitar tech.
#18
Zombie thread brought back to life by a spammer selling sustain blocks.
Last edited by dspellman at Jun 30, 2015,