#1
Does anyone here play DnD? As much shit as it gets being for nerds and whatnot, recently, I've been thinking I want to try playing it. I like me some RPGs, and I've never played a physical board game RPG.

And for the most part, every time we play Skyrim, it's basically the same thing in video game form (I'm assuming; never played DnD before).

I've tried looking it up online to see where to get it and what's needed. But it's almost like a cult, like, if you're not in the loop, it's difficult to get in the loop. The website doesn't list prices, and I have no idea what actually pieces/equipment is needed to play the damn game.

Is it as easy as going to Walmart/etc. and grabbing the "My First DnD" set off the shelf? Or do I need to go to a comic shop/dedicated game store to get it?

Also, to those that may have played it before, is it even fun?
#6
yes and it's awesome.
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#11
You just need dice, the core rule book and a map and you're set.
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#13
I'd check out a comic shop just because I'd no clue where to start either. Ask de Nurds.
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#14
Quote by jumi1174
Anyone care to elaborate on how one might be able to acquire it and what exactly is needed?



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#15
Depending on what version you play, all you need are dice and a knowledge of the rules (Through friends or from the rule book, although adhering to them specifically isn't necessary, they are more guidelines than anything else)
I have a friend who writes maps/stories himself, and we all play, just around a table with dice and nothing else. You don't even need a board or anything if you have a good story teller and set the mood right (dungeons and dragons at midnight played by candlelight, hell yeah). A sheet of paper and some pens to record things you kinda need though.

EDIT: It is pretty complicated though, I have no idea how I would have started playing unless I had a group of interested friends who actually understand most of the game mechanics
Last edited by GoldfishMoon at Jan 15, 2012,
#17
You need a set of dice and to pick what edition you're playing. And you need a good size group to play. It's a more social version of a video game.

I'd recommend 3rd edition since it's easy to find. Ask around to see if anyone runs games around you so you can learn to play. I played today and I'm playing tomorrow.
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#18
Well i play skyrim, and it has dungeons and dragons.

*Lives on technicalities*
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#19
Best bet is to go online and look for a boxed starter set to learn the basic rules. I'd recommend playing 3.5 edition or looking into Pathfinder which is like 3.5 just with some tweaks because 4th edition was crap.

Then the 3 main books for 3.5 i'd recommend are player's manual, dungeon masters guide and monster manual.

Then there are the settings.

Greyhawk is the default setting used as demonstrations in the core books
Dragonlance i have never played in my life
Forgotten Realms is the setting used by the video games like Baldur's Gate, Neverwinter Nights, etc
Spelljammer is really advanced and basically has your character be a pirate on an interdimensional magic ship.

and Ebberon has magic robots and Halflings riding raptors and triceratops
#20
Seems like it takes a while to get the hang of it but it's fun. I've played simpler tabletop RPGs a couple times.
#22
Quote by jumi1174
Does anyone here play DnD? As much shit as it gets being for nerds and whatnot, recently, I've been thinking I want to try playing it. I like me some RPGs, and I've never played a physical board game RPG.

And for the most part, every time we play Skyrim, it's basically the same thing in video game form (I'm assuming; never played DnD before).

I've tried looking it up online to see where to get it and what's needed. But it's almost like a cult, like, if you're not in the loop, it's difficult to get in the loop. The website doesn't list prices, and I have no idea what actually pieces/equipment is needed to play the damn game.

Is it as easy as going to Walmart/etc. and grabbing the "My First DnD" set off the shelf? Or do I need to go to a comic shop/dedicated game store to get it?

Also, to those that may have played it before, is it even fun?


Yes, I've played it, and if I could fond a Dungeon master in the area, I would play again. The groups I've played with tended to have weekend long drug and booze hangover fests that would have been a blast even without the game.

No, you don't have to buy from a comic book shop, though that will help you hook up with other people that play.
#23
you know, ashamedly I have. Id recommend just researching it a lot, learning to basic rules and just having your dungeon master (can you tell how much pussy i get?) make up a quest/world for you to do to see if you enjoy it before you commit to buying stuff with money and whatnot. creating a character is fairly simple too, and fun.
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#24
I'm a level 10 vice president!

Quote by jumi1174
Does anyone here play DnD?


Yup.

As much shit as it gets being for nerds and whatnot, recently, I've been thinking I want to try playing it. I like me some RPGs, and I've never played a physical board game RPG.


Give it a shot then - the open-ended feel of a game run by an actual human that can adapt to the players is a fun change from a computer.

And for the most part, every time we play Skyrim, it's basically the same thing in video game form (I'm assuming; never played DnD before).


Kind of. There are some discrepancies, but they're mostly in how dice decide everything in D&D.

I've tried looking it up online to see where to get it and what's needed. But it's almost like a cult, like, if you're not in the loop, it's difficult to get in the loop.


It's actually fairly easy, if you can find a group to teach you, which most groups are usually fairly willing to do, outside of one or two jackasses nobody likes but that bring the stuff everyone borrows. Just look around your school's billboards for flyers about afterschool D&D groups, or find a local game shop and ask if they have one a beginner could join into.

The website doesn't list prices,


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_scat_16215_ln?rh=n%3A16215%2Ck%3ADungeons+%26+Dragons&keywords=Dungeons+%26+Dragons&ie=UTF8&qid=1326637881&scn=16215&h=2821a95fd6e07e44f7bba6e8e38149c35870b1d5

You may want to find out which edition the group you'd join is using before buying your books - they changed a lot in fourth edition, and while a lot of people like myself feel it's the Windows Vista to 3.5's Windows XP - the fact that they've had to release two separate volumes of the core game book for 4th edition doesn't exactly bode well for it - apparently some people like it for simplicity, and with the cost the books can carry, it's a good idea to know which one you're going to need.

and I have no idea what actually pieces/equipment is needed to play the damn game.


Basically what you'll need is one set of game dice(A lot of game shops have bowls full of random dice you can just pick from for twenty cents each or so. Make sure to get one of each type - twenty-sided, twelve-sided, ten-sided, eight-sided, six-sided, and four-sided), a player's handbook, and maybe a miniature or two. Once you have those, all you really need is a pencil and a sheet of paper, and everything else is knowledge best explained in-person.

Is it as easy as going to Walmart/etc. and grabbing the "My First DnD" set off the shelf? Or do I need to go to a comic shop/dedicated game store to get it?


You can do it either way - the first game set is nice because it gives you miniatures and dice, along with an easy-to-play campaign, but you still need other people to play it, and usually you want someone with at least some experience running the game.

I'd recommend trying a game with a group, and if it doesn't work there, give the first game set a shot. You definitely need people though, the game needs at least four or five. The starter set gets a little dull after an hour or two if the game master doesn't know what they're doing.

Also, to those that may have played it before, is it even fun?


It's a little tedious for the first two or three levels, but after that, unless you have a group of jackasses or a game master who's more concerned with beating the party than making a good game, it's a blast. Hell, Vin Diesel enjoys it - when someone's dayjob has such highlights as "outrunning explosions", they're going to have an entertaining hobby.
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#26
Pft, shit's for nerds.

Jk, I just don't understand it.
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#29
Quote by ilikepirates
My boyfriend plays it sometimes, I don't fully understand it but I think it'd be fun.


I've played since I was eleven when it just came out in the basic set, not so much once I got to college, because, yeah, it just turns into a drinking game and smoking game at that age.

It just hit me for the first time that people in other countries play it to, pretty amazing how far it has come, and it had a big hand in the advancement/popularity of video games too.


On-topic: If you don't have an experienced player to teach you. I'd start with AD&D 2nd edition if you can find it on-line but an experienced player might have all that stuff already. I think the earliest versions are the best because it leaves a lot more to imagination and chance. The later versions are basically continous tweaking of a good thing into a complicated thing, which isn't necessary.

If you have a good imagination, have a group of nerdy friends that you don't mind not mentioning to your other "cooler, more image self-conscious" friends, and this world just isn't good enough, you need more... start playing.

(Just never fight Orcus unless you steal his wand first. That mistake has already been made.)
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#30
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Pft, shit's for nerds.

Jk, I just don't understand it.


You do of course realize you are on a forum full of band geeks...

We have no one to look down on for doing uncool stuff.
#31
Quote by necrosis1193
I'm a level 10 vice president!


Yup.


Give it a shot then - the open-ended feel of a game run by an actual human that can adapt to the players is a fun change from a computer.


Kind of. There are some discrepancies, but they're mostly in how dice decide everything in D&D.


It's actually fairly easy, if you can find a group to teach you, which most groups are usually fairly willing to do, outside of one or two jackasses nobody likes but that bring the stuff everyone borrows. Just look around your school's billboards for flyers about afterschool D&D groups, or find a local game shop and ask if they have one a beginner could join into.


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_scat_16215_ln?rh=n%3A16215%2Ck%3ADungeons+%26+Dragons&keywords=Dungeons+%26+Dragons&ie=UTF8&qid=1326637881&scn=16215&h=2821a95fd6e07e44f7bba6e8e38149c35870b1d5

You may want to find out which edition the group you'd join is using before buying your books - they changed a lot in fourth edition, and while a lot of people like myself feel it's the Windows Vista to 3.5's Windows XP - the fact that they've had to release two separate volumes of the core game book for 4th edition doesn't exactly bode well for it - apparently some people like it for simplicity, and with the cost the books can carry, it's a good idea to know which one you're going to need.


Basically what you'll need is one set of game dice(A lot of game shops have bowls full of random dice you can just pick from for twenty cents each or so. Make sure to get one of each type - twenty-sided, twelve-sided, ten-sided, eight-sided, six-sided, and four-sided), a player's handbook, and maybe a miniature or two. Once you have those, all you really need is a pencil and a sheet of paper, and everything else is knowledge best explained in-person.


You can do it either way - the first game set is nice because it gives you miniatures and dice, along with an easy-to-play campaign, but you still need other people to play it, and usually you want someone with at least some experience running the game.

I'd recommend trying a game with a group, and if it doesn't work there, give the first game set a shot. You definitely need people though, the game needs at least four or five. The starter set gets a little dull after an hour or two if the game master doesn't know what they're doing.


It's a little tedious for the first two or three levels, but after that, unless you have a group of jackasses or a game master who's more concerned with beating the party than making a good game, it's a blast. Hell, Vin Diesel enjoys it - when someone's dayjob has such highlights as "outrunning explosions", they're going to have an entertaining hobby.


Thanks for the awesome reply man.

Some of the things I'm still confused about are all the different editions. As you said above, the editions can sort of be thought of as different versions of the same OS?

Also, a lot of people are saying I should try to get into a group or something a play from there. Is it possible to just got a "starter set" that comes with pre-made "quests" (I'm assuming this is the right term?), grab some friends, and just follow the rule book from there? Or should I have prior experience?

Also, how long does a typical "session" take; is it like Monopoly where a game can last from anywhere around 3 hours all the way to multiple days?