#1
Bands like rolling stones, metallica... ect... how did they record their guitars? with a microphone in front of an amp? (lol @ that idea)
#3
Quote by teli1337
Bands like rolling stones, metallica... ect... how did they record their guitars? with a microphone in front of an amp? (lol @ that idea)


They still record like that.
#4
Quote by teli1337
with a microphone in front of an amp? (lol @ that idea)

That's precisely how it's always been done, and is still done. A nice Royer 121 in front of a cab along with an SM57, placed pointing at different parts of the speaker cone, some clever and careful work to ensure the outputs are phase matched, and that's it. Placement is an art in itself.
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#6
The only album in the 90s I can think of that used digital amps (a pod 2 if I'm not mistaken) is Ayreon's Into The Electric Castle, but they still blended in some real amps with the pod. Almost all professional recordings still use real amps, cabinets and microphones to this day.
#7
This is the same guy who said it wasn't 'rock and roll' to return a faulty, possibly stolen amp. I think he's either a child or has severe issues so don't be too harsh
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#8
Quote by Paddy McK
This is the same guy who said it wasn't 'rock and roll' to return a faulty, possibly stolen amp. I think he's either a child or has severe issues so don't be too harsh

Yeah, unfortunately even troll threads come up when someone is searching for legitimate answers to questions, so a couple of answers taking the thread seriously might help someone in the future.
Various Strats
PRS SC245 (2007)
Fessenden SD-10 pedal steel
Koch Studiotone XL
Mesa Boogie Express 5:25+
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#9
Reamp that shit bro.
Quote by ZanasCross
I'm now so drunk that even if my mom had given me a blow job at aeg 2, i'd be like I'm a pmp, butches.!

If this even madkes sense... if yhou sig this, Iw ll kill you.
#10
my brother in law still records the old school way. pro tools is for shitty musicians he says.
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#12
Quote by romeozdistress
my brother in law still records the old school way. pro tools is for shitty musicians he says.



Tell your brother in law that he's an idiot.
Quote by ZanasCross
I'm now so drunk that even if my mom had given me a blow job at aeg 2, i'd be like I'm a pmp, butches.!

If this even madkes sense... if yhou sig this, Iw ll kill you.
#13
Why lol at miking an amp? It's still the best way to do it.

In the words of the late great Gary Moore.
"One of the guys from Metallica goes up to [producer] Bob Rock and says, 'This is the sound I want,' and plays him 'Oh Pretty Woman' from "Still Got The Blues". Then they proceed to go through all these pre-amps and processors to achieve it.
I felt I should write and say, 'That's not how to do it. You've got the money now guys, go out and buy a '59 Les Paul, a Guv'nor pedal and a JTM45!"
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Last edited by Cathbard at Jan 15, 2012,
#14
Quote by teli1337
Bands like rolling stones, metallica... ect... how did they record their guitars? with a microphone in front of an amp? (lol @ that idea)


Wow. Thanks for getting out of bed and sharing your thoughts with the world.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#16
They used to use a multitrack recorder, it's the same method as modern music, it was just all manual.
They would record each instrument into a separate track, the guitar is it's own recording, drums, bass, singer all had their own. Then they would play them back at the same time, matching the timing and adjusting the volume. Then once everything was balanced they would put it all onto one track.

Please note, I say track because they did NOT use vinyl records to record in the 60s and onwards, they used the magnetic strips like you see on a cassette tape because they could get better sound quality.

On the left are the different tracks that have been recorded, they can adjust play speed, volume, and other factors. Once they are set up they are all played and put onto the single tape on the right.


Quote by teli1337
Bands like rolling stones, metallica... ect... how did they record their guitars? with a microphone in front of an amp? (lol @ that idea)

Actually that is how it was done and how most do it while on stage. You get a better balance if you mic all of the instruments and play it all through a PA system where each instrument can be balanced than trying to have each instrument playing through it's own amp. It sounds much better if it is all coming out of one source.

Quote by romeozdistress
my brother in law still records the old school way. pro tools is for shitty musicians he says.


Because an amateur who has been doing it for a few years would know better than hundreds of professionals who have been doing it for decades.
Last edited by Vital-Signs at Jan 15, 2012,
#17
Quote by romeozdistress
my brother in law still records the old school way. pro tools is for shitty musicians he says.

Right. Well I'm afraid he's wrong. How can using technology make you a worse musician? Just because someone doesn't record to tape doesn't make them crap
My Soundcloud
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#18
This is how you record a guitar. Many thousands of dollars worth of microphones, including a Neuman U87.

Why spend all that time building your signature tone with the perfect amp all modded and tweaked to perfection and then not use it when you go into the studio?
Thread is ridiculous.
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#19
3 mics seems a bit excessive...


Also, you have a stain on the mesh of the cab.
Last edited by Vital-Signs at Jan 15, 2012,
#21
Quote by Vital-Signs
3 mics seems a bit excessive...


Also, you have a stain on the mesh of the cab.

Three mikes is not uncommon. Quite often you will use things like the Neuman a bit further away than your "instrument" mikes.
Arranging the mics so that everything compliments and gives you the truest representation of what it actually sounds like in person is what separates the men from the boys.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#22
Quote by Paddy McK
Right. Well I'm afraid he's wrong. How can using technology make you a worse musician? Just because someone doesn't record to tape doesn't make them crap

yep, the type of machine you record the audio with doesn't determine whether you're good at recording music or not. that's a bit like saying the guitar you play determines what style of music you play.

nowadays it's no different to any other era: in a professional studio, generally people still mic up their amps because that's just how you capture the way the amp sounds and if you don't want to do that, why use an amp in the first place? if you've got the correct facilities to do this properly (and it's fair to say all proper studios will) this is just the best way to do it.

what is it with all these stupid threads today?
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#23
hes means like using pro tools to fix your ****ups im sure.
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#24
this is most ridiculous troll thread ever
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#25
Quote by romeozdistress
hes means like using pro tools to fix your ****ups im sure.

You can't use it to fix your ****ups. You can copy and paste a correct part over a mistake which is kind of cheating but essentially similar to an overdub because you have to have played the part correctly. You can pitch correct vocals but that's about it as far as fixing ****ups goes
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#26
Even if you are using protools you have to mike up your amp to get a true reproduction of the sound you spent years crafting. When you replace an error in protools what do you use? Punch in - punch out. Those are terms from the days of multitrack tape recording. You still do it essentially the exact same way except it's being recorded onto a hard drive instead of a reel to reel tape.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band