#1
Hey all you special musicians you,

This is my first time posting a thread on ug.

I'm looking for some feedback on some of my covers because I it really helps me develop as a musician.

I used to think some metallica solos were impossible so it's pretty exciting for me to get some solos down. (Or did I? lol)

Here's 2... Thanks if you can comment or reply everybody

Master of Puppets
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uS1Ph1-FUY&feature=channel_video_title

Blackened
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WA0DdzxWyoM&feature=relmfu
Last edited by chrisuy1990 at Jan 15, 2012,
#2
Your precision is very nice! Every now and then you seem to have some minor timing issues (I'm looking at the BYOB cover in particular on that, though that's 11 months old and therefore probably not a very good representation of your skill).
#3
what the hell is up with your lighting? its like the night sky is in your room. nice playing btw from what i saw tho youtube did freeze after 30 seconds
#4
The thing I would most likely change if I were in your shoes would probably be the tone: it sounds a wee bit on the thin side to me. I mean, I know it's thrashy metal and all so you want your mids rolled pretty much all the way back for rhythm playing, but adding some more mids for your lead (AKA soloing) sound probably wouldn't hurt

Your rhythm playing is great although I wouldn't mind hearing a bit more bass in there, but that could also be due to the recording not reproducing your sound entirely accurately. It does sound very tight which is great. What amp and/or effects did you use on this recording?

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Last edited by shwilly at Jan 15, 2012,
#7
Quote by shwilly
The thing I would most likely change if I were in your shoes would probably be the tone: it sounds a wee bit on the thin side to me. I mean, I know it's thrashy metal and all so you want your mids rolled pretty much all the way back for rhythm playing, but adding some more mids for your lead (AKA soloing) sound probably wouldn't hurt

Your rhythm playing is great although I wouldn't mind hearing a bit more bass in there, but that could also be due to the recording not reproducing your sound entirely accurately. It does sound very tight which is great. What amp and/or effects did you use on this recording?


No, you don't want to roll back your mids very much at all. The only record where even Metallica indiscriminately cut out the mids was And Justice For All... and the production on that album is horrific. The amount of scooping that any well produced album has is massively overstated by people who don't know what they're doing.


TS: you need to improve your rhythm and timing, you're off a bit on just about everything. Not enough to be horrific but enough to be slightly jarring to people who know the song well.

It's particularly obvious during the Duality cover, you're way out of time in the intro and during the verse riff you're just picking as quickly as you can rather than actually hitting the rhythm of the song (solid and consistent sixteenth notes).

I'm not surprised you're out of time with that tone though, I'd be shocked if you can hear yourself at all, missing all those mids...
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#8
Quote by shwilly
The thing I would most likely change if I were in your shoes would probably be the tone: it sounds a wee bit on the thin side to me. I mean, I know it's thrashy metal and all so you want your mids rolled pretty much all the way back for rhythm playing, but adding some more mids for your lead (AKA soloing) sound probably wouldn't hurt

Your rhythm playing is great although I wouldn't mind hearing a bit more bass in there, but that could also be due to the recording not reproducing your sound entirely accurately. It does sound very tight which is great. What amp and/or effects did you use on this recording?


I'm using a lin6 hd100 head/ line 6 celestion cab... on the ryhthm I have only a little bit of mids, and the bass and treble is all the way up... on the lead i have reverb, delay, and some mids. (Ya... I guess I really do I have to tweak my tone)

I also recorded with a Zoom H2N
#9
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No, you don't want to roll back your mids very much at all. The only record where even Metallica indiscriminately cut out the mids was And Justice For All... and the production on that album is horrific. The amount of scooping that any well produced album has is massively overstated by people who don't know what they're doing.


TS: you need to improve your rhythm and timing, you're off a bit on just about everything. Not enough to be horrific but enough to be slightly jarring to people who know the song well.

It's particularly obvious during the Duality cover, you're way out of time in the intro and during the verse riff you're just picking as quickly as you can rather than actually hitting the rhythm of the song (solid and consistent sixteenth notes).

I'm not surprised you're out of time with that tone though, I'd be shocked if you can hear yourself at all, missing all those mids...


Whoa... Harsh but true... I really just noticed that now. I know I had to go quicker because I was covering a LIVE duality performance so it was honestly hard to hear the guitar in the first place.

Man. I'll do better on my next Slipknot one... Trust
#10
Bends could use a little work. I didnt notice any vibrato, but its a hammet solo so chances are there wasn't any on the record. Your picking is very solid but becuase of the insane gain levels and delay, it's hard to tell


Good playing
#11
I'm with Zaphod here. Mids are essential to a clear guitar tone; that's where a lot of the body is. Scooped mids can work for rhythm tones, but as much scooping as you did just removes any body and clarity from your tone (which you don't want). for lead tones, you definitely need mids in there to get a full sound, which reduces the need for effects to fill out the sound.

I suggest you roll back the gain a lot and cut the bass a little on the rhythm tone while adding some more mids. That will help with clarity. For leads, cut the gain a little less, roll the mids way the heck up, cut the treble a little (this will add a lot of warmness to your sound) and cut the bass a little to diminish boominess.

As for your playing, it was in time for the most part, but it looked like the fast alternate picking was mostly spazzing, albeit more controlled spazzing than I usually see on here. I think you're doing fine technique wise, but you definitely need to work on the tone.
#12
Im with the consensus to add more mids and re-eq in general. By totally scooping like that, your leads end up sounding thin or whiny and your rythm parts end up sounding like fizz. I'd suggest going easier on both the bass and treble (possibly even cutting them), and letting the mids back in there, at least setting them more toward neutral than cut, but leads certainly can benefit from a bit of a mid boost. Also, backing off on the gain somewhat can better manifest your guitar's tone, IMO.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Jan 16, 2012,
#13
I'll second the timing bit; from watching the Master of Puppets cover, it was most evident at the beginning of Kirk's solo. The fast lick wasn't terribly out of time or anything, but it was off just enough to be noticeable and strange to anyone who's familiar with it. This isn't to say the rhythm is terrible, most of it was quite well done - just off enough to be something that needs fixing.

Also, Kirk isn't exactly the model player to study vibrato from, and yours does sound quite like his. I'd suggest working on your vibrato as well, and doing so by listening to something other than Metallica - Kirk's is something that really isn't something to strive for, to be honest.
#14
Quote by :-D
I'll second the timing bit; from watching the Master of Puppets cover, it was most evident at the beginning of Kirk's solo. The fast lick wasn't terribly out of time or anything, but it was off just enough to be noticeable and strange to anyone who's familiar with it. This isn't to say the rhythm is terrible, most of it was quite well done - just off enough to be something that needs fixing.

Also, Kirk isn't exactly the model player to study vibrato from, and yours does sound quite like his. I'd suggest working on your vibrato as well, and doing so by listening to something other than Metallica - Kirk's is something that really isn't something to strive for, to be honest.


I'm going to third this. I noticed the timing slipping quite a lot on the rhythm part beforehand actually (the rhythm bit that's around the "Master, master, where's the dreams that I've been after" part), it seems to be late quite often.

And yeah, I used to love Metallica but the longer I'd been learning guitar the less I liked Kirk's playing, as you say his vibrato isn't great but also (especially live) his fast passages are really messy and he seems to like hiding it by overusing the wah-wah pedal. Either way he's not the best model for accurate playing..

Finally, everything everyone said about the tone.

EDIT: On a side note, I regret choosing this username.
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Last edited by llBlackenedll at Jan 16, 2012,
#15
Quote by :-D
I'll second the timing bit; from watching the Master of Puppets cover, it was most evident at the beginning of Kirk's solo. The fast lick wasn't terribly out of time or anything, but it was off just enough to be noticeable and strange to anyone who's familiar with it. This isn't to say the rhythm is terrible, most of it was quite well done - just off enough to be something that needs fixing.

Also, Kirk isn't exactly the model player to study vibrato from, and yours does sound quite like his. I'd suggest working on your vibrato as well, and doing so by listening to something other than Metallica - Kirk's is something that really isn't something to strive for, to be honest.


I'll also agree with this.
(Nice avatar by the way, :-D)

Quote by chrisuy1990
I'm using a lin6 hd100 head/ line 6 celestion cab... on the ryhthm I have only a little bit of mids, and the bass and treble is all the way up... on the lead i have reverb, delay, and some mids. (Ya... I guess I really do I have to tweak my tone)

I also recorded with a Zoom H2N


What you really need is a new amp

In my humble opinion, I don't think that your bass level should ever exceed the level of your mids or treble. In my experience cranking the bass it has never lead to great tone. I don't ever like to see my bass over 5 o'clock, but that's just me.
\my 2 cents
#17
Wrong forum, moved to recordings.
In my humble opinion, I don't think that your bass level should ever exceed the level of your mids or treble. In my experience cranking the bass it has never lead to great tone. I don't ever like to see my bass over 5 o'clock, but that's just me.
\my 2 cents

is spot on...too much bass in an attempt to sound "heavy" is a classic schoolboy error non-gigging guitarists make. It happens because people are futily trying to compensate for two things which they're invariably lacking that the sound they've heard on recordings and at gigs had.

1 - sheer volume - Volume plays a massive part in what we generally think of as a pleasing guitar tone, and there's no substitute. People always talk about pushing tube amps but even with solid states and modellers there's a sweet spot where the speaker starts pushing a decent amount of air and everything becomes a bit more lively and dynamic.

2 - a bass player - the bass fills in the low end, not the guitar. If you're playing solo then don't try to compensate for it not being there, you can't.


In addition you're also trying to compensate for your pissweak thin tone which is a direct result of you having no mids.

Guitar is a midrange instrument, that's the space it occupies. Too much bass in the tone just makes it sound boomy and muddy, don't confuse that boominess with "heaviness". Mids are where the "weight" of a guitar tone lies, that's what gives it crunch and balls, not bass frequencies. Most guitar tones are a lot treblier than people realise, it's just that the overall sound of a band will even everything out when you're listening.
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#18
too much bass in an attempt to sound "heavy" is a classic schoolboy error non-gigging guitarists make.


Definitely. I remember in the past when I would cut mids and try to increase the bass to make it more full, then id try to increase treble to make it sound cutting enough. Each next step was just a new mistake meant to counteract the prior one. You end up being pushed toward either unecessary mud or thin, whiney-ness; or kind of both at once (mud when playing in lower registers, expecially with power chords, and thin-ness when doing single-note lines).

Too much bass in the tone just makes it sound boomy and muddy, don't confuse that boominess with "heaviness". Mids are where the "weight" of a guitar tone lies, that's what gives it crunch and balls, not bass frequencies. Most guitar tones are a lot treblier than people realise, it's just that the overall sound of a band will even everything out when you're listening.


Exactly. I now generally approach it from the perspective of reducing bass to avoid mud and because it's unecessary in an ensemble, and increasing mids to "make up for it" and provide fullness; treble to taste and environment (sometimes moderately cut, sometimes neutral, sometimes moderately boosted). The only exception I can think of would be if it's a really bright Marshall; then I might be more inclined to immediately go for the jugular of the treble and/or prescence, and keep the bass more neutral or possibly boosted a bit.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Jan 16, 2012,