#1
I've always been into writing, mostly poetry, but now that I've taken the guitar up and I feel I'm good enough to write a song, I just can't write one. Perhaps because I usually write a poem, but maybe it's writer's block as well since I haven't written a poem in MONTHS. Any suggestions/tips/starting out tips/anything?
#2
First, you need to look at any life experience you've had. Say, a bad break-up, anger at someone, etc. something memorable to you. (If nothing like that has happened to you (like me), let your mind trail off until you come up with a good scenario.) Then, like you would a poem, start writing lines that rhyme in a pattern you like (I like abcb) and have a beat. Play some simple chords to go with it, usually A, D, G, and C all fit together nicely, and then you have a song.

A good format to go by is VERSE, CHORUS, VERSE, CHORUS, BRIDGE, CHORUS (VERSE, CHORUS) You can add the last 2, but it can be a bit much sometimes. That's really for songs with long solos or such in between the BRIDGE and CHORUS after it.

Hope that helped!
#3
^ Sticking to the verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, chorus is a very annoying format. It's overused, and it's really boring. Try spicing it up.

Also, if it's a sad song, write in minor. Have a simple chord progression, like Am, Em, C.
If it's happy, right in major. Such as G, D, A, C.
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#4
I write a bit of poetry as well. It's helpful as a mental exercise and often I pick a line or two out of the poem for use in songs. More importantly I read from good authors like Bradbury and Hemingway, well written prose can spark something imaginative.

My method:
1. Start with a concept/thesis, sum up the song in one sentence.
2. Try to focus on melody first, just sing ohhs and ahhs in place of actual words. You'll find certain consonants and vowels fit better than others within the framework of the melody.
3. Then, like a sculptor, chisel more and more detail into the song until you have a concrete representation of the original concept.

Pretty linear actually, I get writers block if I try to force something lyrically or melodically that doesn't fit so I constantly refine and rewrite. Remember you're not writing poetry here, you have a more flexible form to work with and the end goal should be something that sounds good first and makes linguistic sense second.
#5
Quote by skylerjames13
^ Sticking to the verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, chorus is a very annoying format. It's overused, and it's really boring. Try spicing it up.



I know it's bland, but I was jut throwing suggestions.

My favorites are:
Intro, Verse, Chorus, Verse, Chorus, Bridge, Verse, Chorus, Outro
Intro, Verse, Chorus, Verse, Breakdown Chorus, Verse, Bridge, Chorus, Outro

These are rather long, shorter ones are
Intro, Verse, Chorus, Verse, Bridge, Verse, Chorus, Outro
Intro, Chorus, Verse, Chorus, Breakdown, Verse, Chorus


And yes,
Quote by skylerjames13

Also, if it's a sad song, write in minor. Have a simple chord progression, like Am, Em, C.
If it's happy, right in major. Such as G, D, A, C.
#6
Thanks for all the help. I really liked the 'chiseling' concept of it, @herodotus .

But while what I usually come across is verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge/solo, chorus, I'm more into telling stories. Which don't necessarily have a chorus in them, or maybe even a structure. Keep it chaotic, you know? But add some order to it, too. Details, almost like making the person listening to it imagine it's happening right in front of them.

What say?
#7
Quote by herodotus
Remember you're not writing poetry here, you have a more flexible form to work with and the end goal should be something that sounds good first and makes linguistic sense second.


Lyrical poetry is a form of free-form poetry, which is (surprise, surprise) a form of poetry. Even when you're writing "regular" poetry, you're supposed to put quality before linguistics. Many poets make up words or use onomatopoeia to add flavor, and that is definitely not grammatically correct.

What I'm trying to say here is that, when writing lyrics, you should approach it the exact same way you approach poetry. Given that you are already a poet, it should come fairly naturally.

Also, I'm not trying to be an ass, herodotus; your comment just went well with the message I wanted to convey towards the TS.
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#8
I looked at that too. But then assigning chords to that was the catch of it all. But I'll give it another try, when it comes again.
#9
Quote by narinderkapur
Thanks for all the help. I really liked the 'chiseling' concept of it, @herodotus .

But while what I usually come across is verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge/solo, chorus, I'm more into telling stories. Which don't necessarily have a chorus in them, or maybe even a structure. Keep it chaotic, you know? But add some order to it, too. Details, almost like making the person listening to it imagine it's happening right in front of them.

What say?


A good friend of mine wrote a story song once, it had a chorus, along with several verses, a bridge, etc. I'l give you a link. http://soundcloud.com/gateway01/his-majesty

It's not the world's best song, but it gets the message across. You can have a full song formation in a story. The secret is that the chorus has to pertain to the story, without having any sort of events or decisions or anything like that. Also, the bridge is the turning point. Almost always.

Of course, you can put it together however the hell you want, it's your song. I'm just throwing suggestions.

Hope I helped.

Hey, anyway..
Would you be willing to critique one of my songs? (1st one in sig)
Last edited by gateway01 at Jan 17, 2012,
#10
I'll be glad to do that. And thanks for the suggestions, and I'll drop in on soundcloud to listen to your friends song, too. Thanks a lot!
#11
This might help but it really depends on individual, the way I write something, I write it in a conversational manner of what I feel strong about. It's usually recommended that you write the chorus first, but I usually don't.
#12
Nah, I doubt choruses are for me, I can never go beyond simple rhymes, so I left choruses.