#1
Well usually they go hand to hand right?
But when I play scales (with the exception of the chromatic scale) my fret hand will slide to the left (directing at the tune buttons) to get press further strings easier. Think of the bending motion.
I'm getting a clear sound, but I think it's a bad habit. Cause most guitar players, keep their hands straight when playing scales.

Should I fix this habit, or just continue to play like that until I stumble on problems?
My hands are quite small, don't know if that is of any help.
#2
Proper technique implies that everything sounds as it should


Other than tone.
#3
Both are important, but technique can vastly improve the sound, while the opposite is not true.
#4
It's always harder to correct bad technique the longer you've developed it, so if you know what you need to fix now, get at it.
Last edited by Iommianity at Jan 16, 2012,
#5
I'm getting a clear sound, but I think it's a bad habit. Cause most guitar players, keep their hands straight when playing scales.

If you're achieving the correct sound, you are doing it right.
There are more than one way to play something and it's natural for you to find different ways to execute something.

A good sound is made from a good ear for music and a good technique.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#6
To me sound is way more important than the technique...
Music is sound. While technique could help a lot, if you focus more on that than the actual sound, you're not going to get anywhere.
#7
I have been trying to get better guitar chops(not necessarily proper technique) since I started playing. Wanted to have a style like so and do, be smooth like this player, or really dynamic with solos like that player. Things really came out when I got a nice strat and plugged into my 71 fender twin. Sound does make a difference. I started chasing other players tone after that. It ain't easy on a budget mind you. Best thing is to not waste money on junk equipment, learn how to create good tone with your equipment, and develop your own style until you die. Never stop growing musically.
#8
I'm getting a clear sound, but I think it's a bad habit. Cause most guitar players, keep their hands straight when playing scales.

If you're achieving the correct sound, you are doing it right.


Not always. Sometimes there are many ways to get the same sound, and some are better than others.

While I don't understand exactly what your problem is threadstarter, you don't want to move your hand for each note or have your fingers at an angle to the frets when playing scales.
#9
yep, by improving technique, you will improve your sound
R.I.P. Randy Rhoads
#10
Quote by Freepower
Not always. Sometimes there are many ways to get the same sound, and some are better than others.

While I don't understand exactly what your problem is threadstarter, you don't want to move your hand for each note or have your fingers at an angle to the frets when playing scales.



I start out with scales like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=En3W7LkihW0
See the fret-hand position at 1:35


But the more I go down, my left hand will become like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AVXax5AXOA
See Steve Vai's fret-hand at 0:24.

It doesn't really show when doing the chromatic scale. It's mainly when I do the scales on frets 1-4.

I want to know if this fret-hand movement is a bad habit I should fix, or stay with it because the sound doesn't suffer from it.

I hope this clears it up.
#11
It depends - it's unavoidable that your hand will angle at the top or bottom of the neck, and it's going to happen whenever your thumb is over the top (which is necessary for bends).

What you should try to do is be able to get between "straight" and "angled" depending on what you need to play. Anything stretchy (three note per string scales for example) will require a fairly straight hand, and some chords or licks require an angled hand (blues repeating bend licks for example).

As long as your hand doesn't angle too much it's not a problem, but pay attention to it every now and again to make sure you're not compromising your reach and finger strength.
#13
When playing the FOCUS should be on the sound.

Every experienced guitar player will tell you that it doesn't matter how you hold your fingers as long a you obtain the desired sound.

If it sounds good to you don't change anything.

There are some common finger patterns because they are probably more economic and more practical. Music is about hearing not about how you play it technique wise.

Anyway, if you want to change your technique i suggest you read chapters 1 and 2 in my free ebook so that you can achieve that faster .

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/


Good luck,

Paul