#1
My band plays heavy metal(Judas Priest,Accept,Skid Row,Guns n Roses...)
We would like some advice to set up our amps to sound the best as we can . I play a Marshall Avt 50 , and the other guitarsit plays a Randall RG50TC and the bass player has a Laney rb-4 .

Also,during gigs, we have been ecounturing problems such as , not hearing each other or even ourselves( we all had monitors) .This has been an issue on almost all gigs we played (about 10 ). Is that our fault due to lack of experience or is the guy who sets up the stage to blame? (we always had tone rehersals ,and durign those rehersals it would be great, but during the shows, it would be awfull)
Do tone guys hate us ?
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/newthread.php?do=newthread&f=4#
#2
Before the gig get up on stage, and set your levels. Have someone you know out in the audience that can tell you if someone is too loud or to quiet.
Quote by JD Close
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#3
OK, these are all combos. If you have them on the floor on a stage the sound just goes straight past your feet. They need to be angled up or on top of other cabs (some people use dummy cabs, spare 4x12s or even extension (wedge shaped) speakers. The idea is to create a sweet spot where you can here yourself and then just move out of that spot and you hear the band. This is also where you can control the feedback - it works better with a 4x12 since they through sound like lasers, 1 x12 combos are useless at this, 2x12s sort of workable for rock, not so good for metal.
You cannot expect the sound guys to know exactly what you want in the monitor mix unless you are the main act and have rehearsed with them. When you play live the things you need in the monitors are mainly vocals, kick and snare. This helps the vocalist(s) to pitch and the rest of you stay in time. Unless there is a dedicated monitor desk you cannot get individually tailored mixes for everyone and the vocalists monitor mix is the most important - so that's what you get.
#4
Quote by PSimonR
OK, these are all combos. If you have them on the floor on a stage the sound just goes straight past your feet. They need to be angled up or on top of other cabs (some people use dummy cabs, spare 4x12s or even extension (wedge shaped) speakers. The idea is to create a sweet spot where you can here yourself and then just move out of that spot and you hear the band. This is also where you can control the feedback - it works better with a 4x12 since they through sound like lasers, 1 x12 combos are useless at this, 2x12s sort of workable for rock, not so good for metal.
You cannot expect the sound guys to know exactly what you want in the monitor mix unless you are the main act and have rehearsed with them. When you play live the things you need in the monitors are mainly vocals, kick and snare. This helps the vocalist(s) to pitch and the rest of you stay in time. Unless there is a dedicated monitor desk you cannot get individually tailored mixes for everyone and the vocalists monitor mix is the most important - so that's what you get.



Exactly this