#1
Sometimes when I am playing I come across a cool little riff or song idea but it sounds like it would fit somewhere in the song like in the middle or something. Do you think it is a good approach to build a song around the idea? Or, start from the beginning and try to improv an intro...and then the rest of the song.
#2
when i come up with little tidbits i like i kinda note them, record them or whatever and then just think about them and come back to them later when i have a clearer idea of what it needs to do.
#3
thats the thing though. i hate having to try to think of what to do. I just want it to happen naturally.
#4
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
thats the thing though. i hate having to try to think of what to do. I just want it to happen naturally.


yeah, that doesn't really happen. it feels like it's just coming from your inspiration or whatever, but realistically a lot of thought goes into constructing music, both consciously and subconsciously. if it was as easy as just "happening naturally" we'd all be famous by now.
modes are a social construct
#5
^ this

i realized a long time ago that for me letting it happen naturally usually meant thinking about it. i'm lucky that i'm at a point where i can just let the musical idea rattle around for a day or two and have plenty of ideas for the song, but it didn't happen over night. it took alot of years of learning, playing and listening.

everyone starts somewhere so try humming something that you think goes well with it then figuring out what it is you're humming and go from there.
#6
Get a notebook, keep it near you as much as possible with a pen. Keep a guitar and your notebook close to you when you listen to music or when you're in bed. Random snippets of music will come to you, some will be crap, some won't. Write them all down and eventually you'll find that a few bits fit together if you move them around a bit. That's how you get started, then maybe you'll have something to work from
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#7
use that tid bit, breakdown it from the major scale. pick a feeling, build on the feelings.
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#8
Quote by Paddy McK
Get a notebook, keep it near you as much as possible with a pen. Keep a guitar and your notebook close to you when you listen to music or when you're in bed. Random snippets of music will come to you, some will be crap, some won't. Write them all down and eventually you'll find that a few bits fit together if you move them around a bit. That's how you get started, then maybe you'll have something to work from


i tried this a lot when i was first trying to write songs years ago, and it's nice for little lyrical snippets or ideas, but when it came to actually writing the melodies, unless i used notation or something that took so long to write down i'd forgot the piece, it would be different every time i read it. either i'd have to write a fairly simple idea, or hope that the 'feeling' of the piece would be the same.

it got to where it was so inconsistent i just worked on piece in my head, or would write it out and let it expand as i built over it. of course, it's all on the individual, but the whole notebook thing only goes as far for me as long as i'm writing straight quarter notes or a very simple, easy-to-remember rhythm.
modes are a social construct
#9
First of all, one thing I've painfully realized is that it's a lot easier to come up with little cool bits that might work in a song than it is to actually create a song that works. This is particularly the case if you sit around twiddling your thumbs waiting for the song to write itself.

Find the melody. Sometimes the guitar part you've come up with leads you to a melody, but don't be a slave to it. With most genres of music, the instrumentation supports the melody, not vice versa.

THe best songs I've written have felt like they've written themselves - but they've written themselves while I was sitting down making an effort to write them.
#10
Quote by HotspurJr

THe best songs I've written have felt like they've written themselves - but they've written themselves while I was sitting down making an effort to write them.

i couldn't agree with this any more, it's funny because the more i write the more second nature this type of automatic writing becomes. i think as musicians, as we progress, songwriting itself becomes a kind of filter where you hear an idea and start thinking of other things that would complement the sounds and you just go from there.
#11
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
Sometimes when I am playing I come across a cool little riff or song idea but it sounds like it would fit somewhere in the song like in the middle or something. Do you think it is a good approach to build a song around the idea? Or, start from the beginning and try to improv an intro...and then the rest of the song.

Work at that idea and build on it. Find a part that goes before or after, and decide if what parts they are where they fit then continue to build the other parts.

You don't have to write the song in order. You might write the intro last.

I think it is quite common to start with the hook or some seed idea and build the song from there.

sometimes a song might arise out of a jam, a harmonic progression, an interesting rhythm, you might start with just the melody, or the lyrics and then build from the lyrics.

The point is that it doesn't matter where you start as long as you work on it and FINISH it.

A thousand ideas jotted in a notebook or recorded on your harddrive that are never developed are a waste of time. One idea that leads to a full song is worhwhile.
Si
#13
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
anyone here think that your songwriting skills are only as good as your soloing skills?


Nope... cause I suck at soloing, but I can write fairly good songs
#14
i don't even have solos in the vast majority of my guitar music anymore.
modes are a social construct
#15
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
anyone here think that your songwriting skills are only as good as your soloing skills?


Not at all.