#1
So I got a copy of Superior Drums 2.0 by Toontrack software. And I have used a lot of different Drum programs and beat making programs, midi programs, etc etc. This is my first time using Superior Drums, and there is a term I am unfamiliar with, and that is; Bleed Levels. I am not sure what that means. I was going to installed the Sound addon and it wants me to choose between a full, basic, etc etc type install, and one of the differences between them, is the basic one doesn't have Bleed Levels, and since I don't kno what that is, I am not sure if it's something I am gonna want to use in the future or not (I am using this software to program drums, obviously lol, for tracks I've recorded. I record both Guitars and Bass on my own, but I don't have my own drumset so I program them, and I've used various other programs to do this, and they all worked fine, but I was recommended Superior Drums 2.0 by a fellow musician/producer friend and so wanted to give it a shot. I play/write metal music, Mostly a mix between Metal/Hardcore/Melodic, stuff like Veil of Maya, August Burns Red, Volumes, Parkway Drive, etc etc, but obviously in my own style, so like i said, I was just wondering what bleed levels were and if it's something that would even apply to what I am using this software for. Regardless if it's something i would use, I would still like to know that they are and what they are used for. And what is "Bleed Through" when it comes to drums. Apparently from what I Read, it's generally something you want to eliminate. From what I can tell, it seems like something that messes up the true sound of the drums on a recording.
Agile Septor Elite 7-String
ESP H-1007
ESP H-1001
Peavey 5150
Mesa Boogie Cab

Recording Gear -
PreSonus FireStudio Interface
CX5 Studio Monitors
Last edited by BackSeatSuicide at Jan 16, 2012,
#2
bleed through is when say a mic picks up some instrument other than the instrument its mic'ed to. say like when you hit the kick and the snare mic picks up a little of it, thats the kick bleeding through into the snare mic. a little bit of bleed through gives a more realistic sound in that it sounds like a full kit was recorded together instead of keyboarded out in front of a computer.
#3
Yea, that's basically what I thought. So then are the bleed levels a way to control that I am assuming. Especially if you are just programming the drums, that way you can give it a more realistic sound and control the amount of bleed on the track ?
Agile Septor Elite 7-String
ESP H-1007
ESP H-1001
Peavey 5150
Mesa Boogie Cab

Recording Gear -
PreSonus FireStudio Interface
CX5 Studio Monitors
#4
thanks for the help by the way. I've been recording stuff for quite awhile. Been a musician most my life (I am 25 now) but I've never really recorded the drums, and when i did, I always just programmed them, which I am pretty good at, but I for some reason never heard that term. And I am trying to learn all I can before i start my Degree program at the college I am starting at, for AUdio Engineering/Music Production (as well as some Music classes, cause no matter how long you've been playing, you can always better yourself)

on quick lil side note, how do i get my Sig to update. The gear in my sig is from years ago when i first started this profile

EDIT - Nevermind, fixed it. Had a stoner moment lol
Agile Septor Elite 7-String
ESP H-1007
ESP H-1001
Peavey 5150
Mesa Boogie Cab

Recording Gear -
PreSonus FireStudio Interface
CX5 Studio Monitors
Last edited by BackSeatSuicide at Jan 16, 2012,
#5
^ yeah the bleed levels i would assume basically turn up the amount of bleed through in the mics, obviously you want a little but not too much otherwise it'll just sound poorly mic'ed (unless thats what you're going for) i would try to turn it up just to the point where it's not really noticeable unless you mute the bleed through altogether. basically with the bleed through on it shouldn't be noticeable but when you turn it off it should immediately sound a bit "lacking" best bet is to test it out yourself.