#1
I recently bought a Fender Telecaster. From what I understand they come with 9's.
This is my first electric guitar after playing acoustic for 3-4 years.
So far I love the guitar. The problem I'm having is fretting the strings too hard and making the notes sharp, thus making the guitar sound out of tune. Especially during quick chord changes.
I guess this is from the years of playing my acoustic, and mashing the strings down to get them to ring clearly.
Seems no matter how lightly I try to fret, this still happens. I'll continue to work on my technique, but if I put a set of 10's on, do you think would that help?
Any other tips or suggestions?
Thanks
#2
Possibly, higher gauge strings and a higher action could help this or you could just try to adapt to the lighter touch which electric requires. i'm not sure 10s would be enough though, maybe 11s or even 12s.
#3
Try power slinkys by Ernie ball. They are 11's. A heavier gauge will help with stronger fingers and will create a more full tone.
#5
It just depends on what you want to play but; I'm just going to say 'Yes' because, you can do more with the thicker guages because they're stronger.
What I mean is, you can't down tune to Dropped C with out breaking the strings with 9s.
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Last edited by treborillusion at Jan 18, 2012,
#6
Quote by SouthFL79

I guess this is from the years of playing my acoustic, and mashing the strings down to get them to ring clearly.
Seems no matter how lightly I try to fret, this still happens. I'll continue to work on my technique, but if I put a set of 10's on, do you think would that help?
Any other tips or suggestions?
Thanks
Acoustic guitars do sort of "ruin your touch" for electric.I've been playing mostly acoustic recently. That said, all I could get of of my electric was mostly noise, until I changed the strings from .009 to .042, "electric light", to electric "regular" @ .010 to .047.

With regulars, the bass is tighter and better sounding, but you can still bend the high strings fairly well.

Going higher than .010 to ,047 will hamper bending somewhat, (although I'm quick to admit there are plenty of guitarists stronger than me).

Peter Townshend says he uses really heavy gauge strings, but he pounds on the guitar good and proper.

You'll probably need to tweak the set up on your guitar a bit after a string change. Be careful about flying at the truss rod adjustment, it needs to be touched far less than many people claim. Usually, just a bit of height adjustment of the bridge will suffice.

Keep in mind electric string sets are cheap so; you can afford to experiment. Or, you could build a hybrid set to match your touch.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 18, 2012,
#7
Yeah I dont play any other tuning than standard (so far).
I bought a set of Ernie Ball 10's when I bought the guitar, after reading some advice here and a few other sources. I play mostly country and rock.
I will go ahead and change them out to 10's I already have and next time I change maybe bump them up to 11's if needed and see what I like the best.

I didn't realize how much different the technique of playing electric would be. With the callouses on my fingers from the acoustic, I cant even feel the higher strings with the 9's I have on there now. By the time I can feel them, I'm already pushing too hard and it sounds like I'm murdering a cat. I'm sure I'll adjust to it with some time and practice.

Any other tips or suggestions, keep em coming!
Thanks for the help so far guys. Appreciate it!
#8
No, but more practice will.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#9
Lowering the string height a bit will tend to reduce the "going sharp" effect from fretting too hard, since less pressure/tension is needed to press the strings to the fretboard. This will have more of an effect on the higher frets. Given that fret buzz is less of an issue with the higher strings, you could just lower those strings.
#10
Quote by treborillusion
It just depends on what you want to play but; I'm just going to say 'Yes' because, you can do more with the thicker guages because they're stronger.
What I mean is, you can't down tune to Dropped C with out breaking the strings with 9s.


How does one manage to break strings when downtuning?
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