#1
Hi,

I have studied about 5 months in the national conservatory at Peru. Then I stopped. That was about 2 years ago.

About 6 months ago, Ive been studying electric guitar at a music academy that is focused on rock. However I have to stop for a while.

Now, I want to study but my goal is to study a whole musical career with guitar. However, I would like to study electric guitar. This academy offers me a "musical career",that lasts 3 years. However, they dont give you any official certificate. And it is really expensive also. (I also can study theory, harmony, etc , there)

Or I can choose to go back to the conservatory...I really like the idea of learning classical music and theory and stuff, but I would really like to be a electric guitarist. Of course it would be GREAT to be a pro at both electric and classical, but now I have to choose just one. And the conservatory is really cheap since it belongs to the state. Its like a public university. And they give you a certificate when you finish with official value. Besides , here the conservatory is like the musical elite in my country, is really hard to enter there.

So, if I want to be a musician, which of those would be the best for me? I would really like to be a complete musician and know how to play rock, jazz, flamenco and classical...but i dont know what to do first...

Thanks

PD: My mom wants me to get that "certificate" since it can really help you to get a career abroad.
#3
the classical guitar, depending on your approach to it, may be more boring. i definitely wouldn't stop playing electric whilst you are learning classical cos learning classical guitar is very different from electric, in terms of scales and theory used as well as techniques used like picking/finger picking, sweeps picking, pinch harmonics (only occasionally used in classical music).
#4
I would go back to the conservatory to study with the classical and practice on the electric on my own.
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#5
^this. the conservatory will likely help you more if you have a good approach to it.
#6
Of course i will continue praciticing electric by myself, but will conservatory help me with my electric guitar playing indirectly? or not?
#8
a skill acquired is an acquired skill, however have in mind you cant be excellent at everything, you have to choose wether you want to be excellent on the electric , excellent on the acoustic or good at both. (being just good isnt enough nowadays).

I like Steve Vai´s opinion on it, you have to find what youre really good at and what inspires you, concentrate on your strenghts and dont worry about your weaknesses or what others do best.

What you like the most is usually what you will do best and will give you a chance to stand out from the rest by finding your own identity.

Do you think he spent the same ammount of years he spent on his electric on an acoustic? do you think Segovia practices Whammy bar stunts ?

a Degree proves little, chops and what you do with them will achieve way more.
Learn marketing and business or psychology, will be more helpful for making money out of your career.
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 18, 2012,
#9
Quote by Slashiepie
a skill acquired is an acquired skill, however have in mind you cant be excellent at everything, you have to choose wether you want to be excellent on the electric , excellent on the acoustic or good at both. (being just good isnt enough nowadays).

I like Steve Vai´s opinion on it, you have to find what youre really good at and what inspires you, concentrate on your strenghts and dont worry about your weaknesses or what others do best.

What you like the most is usually what you will do best and will give you a chance to stand out from the rest by finding your own identity.

Do you think he spent the same ammount of years he spent on his electric on an acoustic? do you think Segovia practices Whammy bar stunts ?

a Degree proves little, chops and what you do with them will achieve way more.
Learn marketing and business or psychology, will be more helpful for making money out of your career.


Thanks for that opinion. As you may expect, i want to master both. Tbh, I feel more comfortable with electric, but I also like classical. However, here , the conservatory is like the elite of music, and I want to be a complete musician not just a guitarist. But my cocern is that , if I learn classical guitar, maybe i will suck at electric? Or it will be easier for me to master electric in less time? Not sure about that... Maybe if I go to the conservatory but also take some lessons on electric guitar with some good teacher?
#10
Quote by itamar100
classical guitar is very different from electric, in terms of scales and theory used

Not at all. Scales are scales and theory is theory; they're universal to music, let alone the guitar. You don't switch from the acoustic major scale to the electric major, and classical is the same way.

Technique is different yes, but "scales and theory" are exactly the same.
#11
Indirectly, it'll help massively.

If you only have the choice of one, and you do really love playing classical guitar as well, then the conservatory actually gives you a qualification, and most likely will have a higher standard of instruction.

And it's cheaper.

picking/finger picking, sweeps picking, pinch harmonics (only occasionally used in classical music).


Those are all used on the classical guitar. Artificial harmonics are pretty common in classical guitar, although they aren't often done with the plectrum (the classical technique is much more precise!).
#14
Quote by Freepower
How could that be a bad thing?
lol just saying. My point is if I can become a good player at both instruments because If I go to the conservatory I will take theory lessons too. So is like excercizing both instruments while learning theory for both? I want to be a complete musician, but my favorite is electrical guitar
#15
I am not replying as a musician because I am still a newbie on guitar but as an old guy offering words of wisdom. It appears that conservatory will do 3 things. Train you on your instrument, provide certification that you are skilled, and give you respect in your community. Whereas the other school is more expensive and will only give you one of the three things. And correct me if I am wrong but it seems like the conservatory is harder to get into which means that you should go for that first and if you still feel like it later you can go to the other school. I don't see why you would not be able to have your classical training subsidize your pursuit of the electric guitar. And finally I know it is a different instrument but Wynton Marsalis has won multiple Grammy's for both classical and jazz trumpet. And on a final final note Ed Van Halen was classically trained.
#16
Go for it. You won't become a poorer electric guitarist for learning to play classical guitar well. Some of the finest electric players out there are very well versed in classical guitar. Your fretting technique is practically the same, so you'll only improve there. You won't be using a plectrum much, but I know a couple of electric guitarists who use custom finger-picks after learning classical style finger picking.

Additionally, you'll pick up a lot of ideas from classical music about theory and how to apply it in a musical context. If you still want to play rock, jazz, or metal guitar on an electric, that knowledge of theory will only benefit you as long as you learn to apply it in a musical manner rather than simply to have it there.

One of my favorite guitarists, a guy named AJ Minette, is studying classical guitar at the collegiate level, but he's also a very skilled electric guitarist. He's the main songwriter for The Human Abstract, a band whose sound is derived in equal parts from metalcore and classical music, which creates an interesting blend.
#17
Your fretting technique is practically the same, so you'll only improve there.


The index finger for electric must be flatter to mute unwanted noise, but apart from that, aye.
#18
Agh. I'd forgotten about that, though I figured that you could just transpose that technique over to classical without any disadvantage.