#1
Hello im pretty new guitarist(a year under my belt now) and I recently started learning leads. I still cant really make a sweep sound right so usually I use a combination of economy picking and alternate picking to compensate(sorta), but im still working on it. I can play the simpler metallica solos IE Am I evil intro solo(I actually learned that one in my first 3 months playing), Master of puppets first solo and the first half of the second, Fade to black first solo, All solos in For whom the bell tolls, first bit to Peace Sells second solo. Now certain solos just seem to click with me and I feel over the last few weeks ive learned these solos Ive really progressed as a lead player. My leads have become way cleaner. I would love to have some lead suggestions that would be in my ball park or push me a little. I am into metal and rock, anything from The Eagles to Autopsy. Thank you for your suggestions. Cheers
#2
I think before you go any further with lead playing, you need to get a solid grasp on vibrato. It's the one thing that every single lead player needs, and if they don't have it, it will sound shit. Now, most people think vibrato is a natural thing. It's not. Just like any other thing it needs practice. Your vibrato needs to be even, strong and to the right pitch. Another thing to think about is, think about where you're bending to when you vibrato. If, for example, you're using E minor pentatonic, and you're playing a G note, using a semitone vibrato is going to sound off-key, because G# is not in the E minor pentatonic. So you would need to bend to the next note (A) instead.
Quote by Cathbard
You don't need epic tone in the bedroom any more than you need mood lighting to masturbate.


#4
The three most important aspects of lead playing are

1. Vibrato

2. Bends

3. Vibrato added to bends


Nothing worse than hearing a guy alternate pick a 4 string 16th note pattern at 170bpm only to land on a note and execute a shitty vibrato or band.

Hell, kirk hammets reputation is almost based entirely on his vibrato. So is gilmours and gary moore's
#5
Quote by mrbabo91
The three most important aspects of lead playing are

1. Vibrato

2. Bends

3. Vibrato added to bends


Nothing worse than hearing a guy alternate pick a 4 string 16th note pattern at 170bpm only to land on a note and execute a shitty vibrato or band.

Hell, kirk hammets reputation is almost based entirely on his vibrato. So is gilmours and gary moore's

So much this. Also, when you learn a solo, don't just learn the notes and then say 'Oh now I can play it'. Learn the notes, then practice the shit out of it until it's as tight as a nun's clunge.
Quote by Cathbard
You don't need epic tone in the bedroom any more than you need mood lighting to masturbate.


#6
heres a link to some stuff ive done. I just uploaded a doodle for you to gauge my bends/vibrato and maybe help me improve them. I still cant figure out how to change the order of the songs in the playlist so the one I uploaded is up as "My Vibrato & Bends"

http://www.purevolume.com/SagalAbad32766
#8
Quote by mrbabo91
The three most important aspects of lead playing are

1. Vibrato

2. Bends

3. Vibrato added to bends


Nothing worse than hearing a guy alternate pick a 4 string 16th note pattern at 170bpm only to land on a note and execute a shitty vibrato or band.

Hell, kirk hammets reputation is almost based entirely on his vibrato. So is gilmours and gary moore's

1- Vibrato
2- Phrasing
3- Sounding clean (great technique, muting)
R.I.P. Randy Rhoads
#9
Quote by Abadinator
heres a link to some stuff ive done. I just uploaded a doodle for you to gauge my bends/vibrato and maybe help me improve them. I still cant figure out how to change the order of the songs in the playlist so the one I uploaded is up as "My Vibrato & Bends"

http://www.purevolume.com/SagalAbad32766

Some things I noticed:
-Your tone is really thin and gainy. I'd recommend cutting the gain back and adding some mids into your lead tone. When you're playing solos, you want a very different tone than you want for rhythm passages. You can get a good, biting attack without being thin and gainy, if that's the tone you want. A good tone is essential to a good lead sound. That's something that you can get even if you had the worst technique in the universe.

-Your bends need to be more in tune. It sounded to me like the half-step bends were alright, but the whole step bends were either slightly flat or sharp (usually flat), which leads me to believe that you don't have as much control over the string. That's something that I expected to hear, since you're only a year in and probably lack the finger strength to pull off that technique cleanly and consistently. Practice with a tuner to make those whole step bends more consistent. After a while, you'll hear if you're sharp or flat and you'll automatically correct the bend.
This video is really good for learning and improving bends.

-Your vibrato is pretty weak. Again, that's something that I'd expect from someone with your experience, since that's a matter of practice and personal preference as you get better with vibrato.
This video is really good for learning and improving vibrato.

Essentially, you're doing alright for the amount of time you've been playing. At a year in, you haven't had time to form any real bad habits and it sounds like you're heading in the right direction. Practice those techniques some and you'll be good to go.

On the subject of tone, I noticed that your rhythm tone on the Holy Wars cover was too gainy. You always need a lot less gain than you think you do when recording. That's something I still have to correct myself on. Your timing and all sounded really solid, though. Nice job.
#10
Quote by Abadinator
heres a link to some stuff ive done. I just uploaded a doodle for you to gauge my bends/vibrato and maybe help me improve them. I still cant figure out how to change the order of the songs in the playlist so the one I uploaded is up as "My Vibrato & Bends"

http://www.purevolume.com/SagalAbad32766


Your bends were mostly flat but i have heard much worse. You could do with knocking the gain down ever so slightly and boosting the mids and maybe add a splash of reverb or delay to soften up the sound.

Your vibrato needs to be wider and a little faster (speed of vibrato can also depend on tempo of whatever you're playing). Make that note sing. You also need to be adding vibrato wherever you can. Even if it's very subtle, it will make that note sound smoother and rounder.

Always let a note settle before you add vibrato. Never use vibrato instantly or you will sound out of tune. You have to wait even if it's just for a microsecond
#11
Thanks man I tried smoothing out my Tone a bit. Tell me what you think. I recorded the Master of puppets first solo. Still for some reason I have no idea how to change the order of songs so bare with me
#12
Definitely an improvement on your tone. Are you using your neck or bridge pickup for your lead work? That's one thing you can do that will make a huge difference, since your neck pickup has a warmer, smoother sound than the bridge pickup. Making that change alone can really change how your leads sound without requiring you to change tones.

I'd roll the gain back still a little more and add a bit more to the mids, maybe cut the treble and boost the bass some. However, the tone on the MoP solo was far better than on your bends and vibrato recording. I'm also gonna compliment you on the harmonies. You kept time on those really well, which a lot of beginner guitarists don't do well at all.
#13
thanks again Ill mess with my tone a little more and maybe post another later today. Im still pretty new to guitar and as much as I hate to admit it I feel like im almost tone deaf. Either way ill work with it some more Thanks again for the advice. and in the vibrato and bends post i made I used my bridge pickup and in mop I used my Neck pickup. I find that the neck pickup sounds thin. I guess it could be my gear. Im using a Peavey XXL head with a Mesa Oversized Recto cab, a MXR 10 band, Monster cables and a Jackson RR3
Last edited by Abadinator at Jan 21, 2012,
#14
If the neck sounds thin, it's probably more your tone than your pup.

Most rhythm tones use a larger amount of gain and have a lot of treble going on so that the notes are crisp and distinct even on your low strings. With a lead tone, you want more mids in there to give the notes more body and strength, often more bass to smooth out the sound (though not too much, since you can easily get a boomy and muddy tone with too much) and cuts to treble and gain, since those both can make tones too grainy and pierce too much. Using different tones for lead and rhythm helps to let your solos cut through even without a ton of gain and treble, since their taking up different places frequencies.

Don't worry if you don't have a good ear for tones quite yet. It takes a fair bit of time and experimentation. I personally didn't know jack about tones until recently myself and I've been playing a while now.
#15
Hey again. I just recorded something ive been playing around with. Usually play it on my bridge pickup but to show you what I mean about the sound of it. Ive been saying its thin but im not sure if thats quite right but, to my ear something sounds like off with it. Anyhow once again thanks for all the advice guys. On a side note after watch some more of that guy you linked me's videos I realized my bends and vibrato were completely wrong. I was bending the string with my fingers and now that I know better it does sound a bit less "clunky"? My question after going through those vids is, the whole "pivot point" by clamping the neck between your index finger and thumb really the only way to get a good bend and vibrato? It feels really weird to me and I find it really hard to just land in that position when I go to add vibrato or bend a string. I play my guitar in classical position with my fretting hand in i guess classical position as well with my thumb usually in the middle of the guitar or off to the side a bit. I also noticed some guitarists like chris brodrick for example dont use the pivot point at times as well. Thanks again for the advice. Cheers!
#16
I personally use my fingers rather than the whole pivot point for most of my bends, especially rapid 1/2 step bends. For whole step bends and whole-and-a-half step bends, I use a pivot point, but for the smaller bends, I don't have to change my hand position (I play with the classical position, too). For vibrato, I tend to use my fingers for the most part, since I'm quite alright with my vibrato's width and control using my fingers.

Your newest clip sounds better than the previous ones for sure. Your vibrato sounds better. One thing to be sure to do is to hold off on the vibrato when you first hit a note. I tend to try to give around half the note's duration without vibrato (that's a rule of thumb, not an absolute rule). If you start off with vibrato, you're essentially starting the note out slightly sharp or flat. If you hold off briefly, then you give the note a singing quality which is very pleasant to the ear.
#18
It sounds like you're top string is out of tune.

Besides a few timing issues and that little sweeping bit, it sounds really good. Your tone has improved a lot. Vibrato sounds good, definitely improved from your first recording. Keep playing around with vibrato; you're making good progress. Now that you have the basic technique down, practice widening it and varying the speed. Vibrato is a very complex technique, but when you master it, it is one of the most expressive tools you'll have at you disposal.

If you want a couple of guitarists with good vibrato to check out and try to emulate, look at David Gilmour of Pink Floyd (who has one of my personal favorite vibrato sounds ever). The solo in Comfortably Numb is an amazing example of his vibrato technique and his control over it. Another guy to look at is Michael Schenker. He's more of a metal guitarist, but his control and his expressive ability is really something. BB King is another guy with great vibrato, especially on bluesy bends. He's got a technique similar to Gilmour's, so I'm a huge fan.
#19
Yea Sorry about the quality of my playing again, I didn't have to much time to dedicate to recording it since I had finals all today but, I dont have any tomorrow so I decided to rerecord it and clean it up.
http://www.purevolume.com/SagalAbad32766

After Checking out both guitarists you told me I like the michael guy but im not much of a soft rock kinda guy so pink floyd tended to bore me but I can see why you admire his vibrato. Cheers!
#20
Quote by Abadinator
Yea Sorry about the quality of my playing again, I didn't have to much time to dedicate to recording it since I had finals all today but, I dont have any tomorrow so I decided to rerecord it and clean it up.
http://www.purevolume.com/SagalAbad32766

After Checking out both guitarists you told me I like the michael guy but im not much of a soft rock kinda guy so pink floyd tended to bore me but I can see why you admire his vibrato. Cheers!


If you're more into metal then check out Gary Moore's and Adrain Smiths vibrato.
#21
Yea was already pretty versed in Adrian Smith's playing but not so much Moores. thanks