#1
So at this point, I know the entire fret-board...I no longer have to give pause to figure out the tone the comes out of a fret, for instance I do not think of the 14th fret of the B-string as the # 14, I think about it as C#/Db.

For a person who no longer needs help learning their way around the fret-board what is the purpose of the chromatic scale...(mind u I mean a PURE chromatic scale, not that linear 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 ect impure chromatic scale warm up and trill exercise BS)

In a TONAL context, how can this scale be intelligently improvised in....without destroying the Tonality?

We have all seen those brainless 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 permutation excercises that bastard-ized versions of this scale offer. How can I bring the Chromatic scale to the same usefulness and level as say....the B minor scale...in say a B-minor context...without losing B as "Do".
#2
listen to this

This is a wonderfull example of how to use chromatics.
The cliched "rig" Signature:

ESP LTD EC-1000VBL (EMG-ed)
Dean Cadillac SilverBurst Left-handed
Boss GT-8
Roland Micro-Cube
Line 6 FlexTone III XL
Levy's straps
#3
To be frank, most "chromatic" things you're going to find in music don't exactly use "the chromatic scale" so much as selectively using various out-of-key notes while still basing it around the structure of a key or scale.

The only way to use "the chromatic scale" as a scale would really be for highly linear lines. If you introduce complete freedom, with no particular note clearly being the tonal center, then you're doing tone rows, not the chromatic scale.
#4
Quote by DiabolusMusica5
So at this point, I know the entire fret-board...I no longer have to give pause to figure out the tone the comes out of a fret, for instance I do not think of the 14th fret of the B-string as the # 14, I think about it as C#/Db.

For a person who no longer needs help learning their way around the fret-board what is the purpose of the chromatic scale...(mind u I mean a PURE chromatic scale, not that linear 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 ect impure chromatic scale warm up and trill exercise BS)

In a TONAL context, how can this scale be intelligently improvised in....without destroying the Tonality?

We have all seen those brainless 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 permutation excercises that bastard-ized versions of this scale offer. How can I bring the Chromatic scale to the same usefulness and level as say....the B minor scale...in say a B-minor context...without losing B as "Do".


I find, that most Cromaticscale used songs are cartoons and circus music.
If you want something cromatic in a song, I myself prefere to "build up" to the next cord, or break down to the next cord, or even sweeps and taps.
Cromatics in solos might also be used, if you shred for example, back and forth can be an option.
John Petrucci has a lot of cromatic "scales" in his solos, and check out Flight of the bumblebee.
Inspiration is everywhere, but also try it out yourself, and see if you can find something cool all alone.
Glufius
#9
You don't have to always worry about destroying the tonality.. Sometimes it can be a good thing. I saw a jazz fusion guy once who had a cool take.. He said use chromatic stuff like that at the times when the drums are breaking down. Then you land on your b on the downbeat and this creates good tension/resolution.