#1
How do you approach playing leads over a very slow groove when the band is on say an A chord and then the bass plays a single note melody to the next chord say to an E chord. How would you know what notes sound best? I know you can just use the scale that the song is in...BUT when the song is at a very slow tempo it seems much much harder to make your lead fit along with the bass.
#2
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
How do you approach playing leads over a very slow groove when the band is on say an A chord and then the bass plays a single note melody to the next chord say to an E chord. How would you know what notes sound best? I know you can just use the scale that the song is in...BUT when the song is at a very slow tempo it seems much much harder to make your lead fit along with the bass.


If the song is as slow as you say, it might be hard to find a melody to play along with.
Honestly, I'd try a few various things. with slight melody, and just, "noise"/sounds, overall.
If there's a groove, or a sertain theme to the tune, you might just want to play something that has the same taste, or the same feel to it, as the rest of the song.
Check some of the longer Prog-songs.
They tend to have som very slow parts, and just see what they do, and see if you can do something similar, without copying too much.

Hope this helps you!
Glufius
#3
Maybe you need to listen to slower songs and see how people structure their leads over it. Comfortably Numb?

Otherwise it's a matter of practice, what makes it easier to solo over faster songs?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Notice what notes the bass plays and consider the intervals between that and what notes you are playing on the lead. Eg if you play a note one octave above the bass, it will sound consonant, while if you play a note a tritone above, it'll probably be clash etc.
#5
Use simple phrases, dynamics and space them out.

Listen to this for some sort of idea.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bkjv9SscotY

Notice how he spaces out his phrases, and how some times he goes really soft, some times louder, and also how simple it is.

Another idea is triad embellishing, where you fret the triad and hammer pull the scale notes near by to embellish it. Hendrix does this a lot.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Jan 19, 2012,
#7
Hmm my advice for slow tempo jamming would be to hear it out in your head, that's about half the battle, then try to play it, remember either way you cut it if you play a wrong note your only one step away from the right note either direction and those accidental notes you hit going into the right note can sound quite interesting, it'll give your playing a much more visceral feeling and allowing to think in ways other than playing a C# over an A major (although knowing your notes is important do not forget that)
#8
The most important thing is to know your place with in the song and to not over crowd it.

If you are playing over a chord progression identical to a verse or chorus you could use the vocal melody as a guide for your solo. That can sound great if done well.
#9
Quote by Appetite_4_GNR
How would you know what notes sound best?


You develop your ear so you know what various notes will sound like over the chord.

Same as with playing over faster changes.

Most people would say it's easier to play over slower changes. When the chord changes, the feel of each note of the solo changes as well, so your solo needs to incorporate an awareness of the changes.

(To get a feeling of this, play a simple riff over a series of chord changes and notice how the feel of it changes).

Over one chord, that's a non-issue. Of course it means that you can't rely on the chord changes to make your solo not feel like pointless wanking, you actually need to know what you want to play.