#1
Hey guys. I've been using a tube amp for the last 6 months or so, prior to that was a solid state and have noticed that tube amps(at least my one) picks up EVERY possible sound, sounds that were not audible on a solid state. At first I noticed this when using the distortion channel and have cleaned up my playing considerable. However I notice when I play on the clean channel and I switch chords, I can hear my fingers lightly moving along the strings, no matter how much I 'rest' my fingers off the chord before moving the the next. Sort of like when moving laterally on the low strings, you hear that 'slide' sound that acoustic guitars get. Even very slight movements will create some sound. Even on the higher strings I can hear my fingers lightly brushing the strings. Granted it is not totally obvious as there are notes being played over it. Is it possible to totally eradicate this or is it by-product of pick ups and a high gain amplifier?
Gear:

ESP Horizon NT II
ESP Horizon NT 7
ESP Horizon FR II
#2
It's possible to get rid of lots of those noise just being really careful about finger placement. I don't know if it's possible to get rid of it all on a high gain amp though.
#3
Using a tube amp, especially one that's being overdriven, tends to create a lot of noise from the amp rather than the strings. I know a lot of tube amps tend to hiss a bit, which isn't something that good muting technique could possibly address, since the noise isn't originating from the guitar. That's why most guitarists who use tube amps or tube amp simulators have a noise gate in their signal chain, since it clears up a lot of the hiss from any other sources than your guitar.

On an electric guitar, even when using lots of gain, it's possible to eradicate all noise originating from the guitar, but no amount of muting technique will get rid of the excess noise from your signal chain or from your amp itself.
#4
Personally, after awhile it became second nature to block strings with my fingers even when I wasn't playing on those strings. For example, say I play a B power chord on the A string, typically my first finger will barely be touching the low E string to stop it form making any noise, even though I am not playing a note there. Also learning how to work your volume knob is a must, turn the volume down whenever you are not playing for more than an instant.
#5
Quote by Rotschefeller
Personally, after awhile it became second nature to block strings with my fingers even when I wasn't playing on those strings. For example, say I play a B power chord on the A string, typically my first finger will barely be touching the low E string to stop it form making any noise, even though I am not playing a note there. Also learning how to work your volume knob is a must, turn the volume down whenever you are not playing for more than an instant.


Oh I'm talking about playing on the clean setting of the amp. Even if I run my fingers lightly up/down the strings(mainly the high strings) I can hear some noise. Say if I play a D major chord and move to an A minor, on the transition of fretted notes to fretted notes I can hear some slight noise.
Gear:

ESP Horizon NT II
ESP Horizon NT 7
ESP Horizon FR II