#1
Yeah, science is against it:

http://www.institutart.com/pdf/flamenco_guitar.pdf

Flamenco guitarists, when plucking the strings with the fingers of the right hand use a technique known as “con apoyo” (with support) or, according to the language of the flamenco guitarists themselves, técnica del picado (figure1).

This playing technique requires, on the one hand, the use of the flexor muscles with much more tension than used by classical guitarists due to the fact that the finger remains pressed on the upper string after playing a note; and, on the other hand, more contraction of the extensors and stabilizers of the wrist and fingers (antagonists).


etc...

They also mention is it has effect on your left hand as well:

The high tension in the right hand of the flamenco guitar means an increased vibration of the strings, which needs be compensated for by higher tension in the left hand to preserve the correct sound of the strings. However, while the guitarist learns the movements of both hands independently, they are not usually able to maintain this with the
amount of tension required in both hands. this leads to excessive tension in the felt hand, beyond what is either necessary or desirable, exposing it to greater risk of lesion. )


Tosum it up, the it increases the probability of injury in a statistically significant manner.

Yeah i know we are not flamenco players, but the principles are the same, Group 1 (anchoring) Group 2 (non anchoring)

Resting fingers = increased tension + stressing angles.

Their mean hours per day was however 5 hours, so that means those practicing less, are less probable to develop injury and viceversa.

So please Bookmark this to cockslap those people that mention the same old argument "its a style dude and it doesnt matter"
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 19, 2012,
#2
k, doesn't change the fact that thousands of amazing guitarists do anchor. I'm not going to bother listing any names because there really are thousands.

p.s. I'm not arguing that anchoring doesn't increase the odds of injury, just that it inhibits good playing in any form.
Last edited by hendrixism at Jan 19, 2012,
#3
Pretty interesting, but just because something is statistically significant doesn't mean that it's practically significant. Saying something is "statistically significant" can be very misleading, and it's something the media jumps on in research to make their stories more appealing.

Hypothetical example: Playing guitar for an hour a day is associated with 20X lower risk of a certain type of cancer. Suppose the risk of this getting this cancer is 80%. Playing guitar reduces your risk risk from 80% to 4%. This is practically significant. On the other hand, what if your odds of getting that cancer in the first place is only 0.02%? That difference is almost negligible, and the statistic isn't practical.

I'm not saying this information isn't useful. It's a pretty cool finding! You just haven't given us enough information to really tell whether it's practical. What is the baseline tension? How big of a difference in tension was there?

Edit: Just read through the study. They say that playing flamenco guitar compared to classical guitar is associated with a higher risk of overuse symptoms, not just anchoring. Anchoring is just one of the aspects of flamenco. There were two key differences that you didn't mention: flamenco players practiced guitar for an average of ~45 minutes more per day and are less likely to warm up before playing. The authors even discuss that these are the main contributing factors to why playing flamenco puts you at a higher risk for overuse.

They don't draw conclusions about only anchoring, as you said they did, based on these results. They interviewed 32 flamenco and 32 classical guitarists, and found 8 more flamenco guitarists who experienced the symptoms. If you look at Table 2, most of the symptoms were pretty even between the groups, except for tension in the upper extremities. They didn't actually study the effects of anchoring, they just discussed it as a possible explanation for the difference, justifying it with differences in tension in upper extremities.
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#4
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Pretty interesting, but just because something is statistically significant doesn't mean that it's practically significant. Saying something is "statistically significant" can be very misleading, and it's something the media jumps on in research to make their stories more appealing.

Hypothetical example: Playing guitar for an hour a day is associated with 20X lower risk of a certain type of cancer. Suppose the risk of this getting this cancer is 80%. Playing guitar reduces your risk risk from 80% to 4%. This is practically significant. On the other hand, what if your odds of getting that cancer in the first place is only 0.02%? That difference is almost negligible, and the statistic isn't practical.

I'm not saying this information isn't useful. It's a pretty cool finding! You just haven't given us enough information to really tell whether it's practical. What is the baseline tension? How big of a difference in tension was there?

Edit: Just read through the study. They say that playing flamenco guitar compared to classical guitar is associated with a higher risk of overuse symptoms, not just anchoring. Anchoring is just one of the aspects of flamenco. There were two key differences that you didn't mention: flamenco players practiced guitar for an average of ~45 minutes more per day and are less likely to warm up before playing. The authors even discuss that these are the main contributing factors to why playing flamenco puts you at a higher risk for overuse.

They don't draw conclusions about only anchoring, as you said they did, based on these results. They interviewed 32 flamenco and 32 classical guitarists, and found 8 more flamenco guitarists who experienced the symptoms. If you look at Table 2, most of the symptoms were pretty even between the groups, except for tension in the upper extremities. They didn't actually study the effects of anchoring, they just discussed it as a possible explanation for the difference, justifying it with differences in tension in upper extremities.


You are indeed right (the time difference also caught my eye, and the fact that flamenco players tend to play a lot of stuff with their index barring) but by the description the flamenco picking style they described can be easily classed as anchoring.

Now the painful thing about science is the coulds, the what ifs and that in the end those are all correlations, maybe flamenco players get laid less and therefore overuse their wrist, however the scientific method is the best way to tackle practical issues.

If it was my research i would compare electric guitarists group 1 anchors, group2 doesnt, group 3 does whatever they want.. it is however pretty hard to get all other variables under control, playing experience and playing time can be selected, but habits as well as genetical predispposition to injury are hard with such a small control group.

This study is the closest i could find and yup i exagerated and broke a scientific rule by making a monocausal statement but if i were to research on it i would definetly go for playing time and anchoring..
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 19, 2012,