#1
Just curious.
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#2
yes

they're called barre chords
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#3
there are lots actually just move standard open chord shapes around the neck and see what sounds to your liking
#6
Quote by Hail
yes

they're called barre chords


that is, word for word, what i came here to say.
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#8
And its also possible to move open chord shapes up the neck and mute the strings you dont want to hear
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#10
Quote by Cloudkicker
Just curious.


I'm not quite sure what you mean.

There are some chords with open strings that work at other frets. For example, and open C words slid up two frets - making it a D11, I guess. But it doesn't work universally.

The C7 shape works anywhere on the neck, so long as you avoid the two e strings.

The top three strings of the D, of course, work anywhere - and in other places where the open D doesn't clash.
#11
Quote by jrenkert
play an A mjor Barre chord E shaped without the barre

Yes, you can do this. By moving these shapes through the chromatic scale, whilst keeping the bass note the same, you'll create the 12 major slash chords, and their chordal implications will reflect a scale or mode.

Works good with open A and D chords.
Quote by HotspurJr
The C7 shape works anywhere on the neck, so long as you avoid the two e strings.

The E works everywhere apart from frets 4 and 8.
#12
Generally chords are classified into three groups, open, barre, and moveable shaped. The shaped chords are used quite extensively in jazz, but can also be used in most genres of music.
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#13
Quote by HotspurJr

The C7 shape works anywhere on the neck, so long as you avoid the two e strings.


The E minor shape works anywhere too, just avoid the E, G, B and high E strings
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#14
Quote by BlackbirdPie
Generally chords are classified into three groups, open, barre, and moveable shaped. The shaped chords are used quite extensively in jazz, but can also be used in most genres of music.

Get back in to GT, interloper.
#15
I can play barre chords and everything, i am just looking for shapes i can use higher on the fretboard to arpeggiate.
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#16
I've used moveable open chords a few times, if you listen to the song I've included a link to you'll hear one where the main acoustic guitar is playing a pattern based around moving an open G chord.
http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/monnae/music/all/play1059858

EDIT: Also check out the song on my main profile page called "Interlude". Pretty much all the way through, it uses the Fmaj7 chord moved up and down the neck with the A & E strings remaining open for all the different chords that one shape produces.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Jan 20, 2012,
#17
Quote by Cloudkicker
I can play barre chords and everything, i am just looking for shapes i can use higher on the fretboard to arpeggiate.

you answered your own question

chords are just notes, if you have the right notes you've got a chord, doesn't matter where those notes are played...if they happen to occur on the open strings then knock yourself out and use them if you want.
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#18
all of the basic open chords are movable actually. just where ever there are open strings, use a barre to play them and your other fingers to fret the notes. it would be the same as playing with a capo. learn the CAGED system, it should help you with that.
#19
Quote by Cloudkicker
Just curious.



Yes there are, and they don't have to be called Barre chords, because a Barre chord is not an open shape in the sense that the barre does not have any ringing open strings. You can for example move a C chord two frets with the same open strings.

like - x 5 4 0 3 0

Now your assignment is, using whatever knowledge you have of notes on the neck, chords and triads and or modified or extended chords, identify the notes in this chord the name of this chord, and tell me why you think it is the correct name of that chord

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 20, 2012,
#20
Quote by Sean0913
Yes there are, and they don't have to be called Barre chords, because a Barre chord is not an open shape in the sense that the barre does not have any ringing open strings. You can for example move a C chord two frets with the same open strings.

like - x 5 4 0 3 0

Now your assignment is, using whatever knowledge you have of notes on the neck, chords and triads and or modified or extended chords, identify the notes in this chord the name of this chord, and tell me why you think it is the correct name of that chord

Best,

Sean

d major add 4 add 9
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#22
It's not a sus chord because you still have the third (the F# on the d string).