#1
but every time i try, my hand automatically repeats the up and down runs, so i force my head to stop it, hit an akward note, then silence.... i mean, some people use less notes, like 4 notes only and they can get pretty creative with it, and what they play is really easy to play so that isn't the issue.... but what i wonder is... how can u come up with great ideas like that?? :O.. i realize that is doesn't matter how fast u play or slow, if u hit real good notes, it can be very beautiful..
#2
I have been working w/ Pebber Brown's 14 Pos system for Maj/min triads and Maj/Min 7th Arpeggios...its a free download PDF on google...I think you would be surprised with how much you can do with (maybe w/ slides and ho/po's) wit just the 4 tones from a Diatonic I Maj or a i min 7 chord. I bet if u sit down and work w/ it a bit, u should be able to stumble onto a whole laundry-list of ideas...and that's from only using 4 tones (-:
#3
Those 4 notes sound beautiful because they choose very carefully WHERE they put those notes and they listen to what's being played behind it.

The key is to listen not to yourself, but everything else. When you hit the awkward note, move on and try to work around it. To have a great solo you need a great rhythm.
I am the crack in the wall, The eye in the sky.
I am the final slumber, The great divide.
I am the silence in madness, That lies to your face,
My woe is accepted, 'tis the end of your race.
#4
Quote by DiabolusMusica5
I have been working w/ Pebber Brown's 14 Pos system for Maj/min triads and Maj/Min 7th Arpeggios...its a free download PDF on google...I think you would be surprised with how much you can do with (maybe w/ slides and ho/po's) wit just the 4 tones from a Diatonic I Maj or a i min 7 chord. I bet if u sit down and work w/ it a bit, u should be able to stumble onto a whole laundry-list of ideas...and that's from only using 4 tones (-:


Diab thats a pretty advanced system and definetly not the solution for her current problem Pebber actually suggests starting with the 5 pos system and only moving to the 14 pos once you have major, minor, harmonic m, melodic m , hungarian minor , penta and blues as well as their different arpeggios down on all keys (not only the shapes but the sound memorized)

Luxeion: for the time being dont focus on the shapes, focus on the sound of each individuall note and how it sounds against the chord/background music you are using, use the chord notes, try other notes, milk every sound you can out of it..

even with shapes i find hard to not actually be creative, its like i cant make up my mind on staying on a single place

You know what speed is amazing for ? getting the hell out of a bad sounding note

It is sometimes extremely hard as a beginner because even if you hear the sounds in your head, your technique might not be at par with what you want to play, it is easy to feel lost around those faceless frets and try to stick to patterns to feel a little bit more secure, but its a process, it is gradual and it takes long, dont force it, if a great idea comes great, if it doesnt who cares, we are not in a hurry

Keep building your chops, your EAR and your Music Theory, those will help drastically.
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 20, 2012,
#5
Here's what I did to start playing the notes more 'musically' if you will, rather than seeing them as parts of scales.
Get a chord progression, find out what scale to use ( honestly, just the major and the minor scale will do, even a simple minor pentatonic can be used for this ) and pick 4 notes of that scale. Now, start improvising and use only those 4 notes.

You'll see you have to start using more vibrato, bends, slides, octaves and what not. It worked for me!

Another trick is to sing random melodies that come to mind and then convert them to guitar licks. Really melodic stuff.
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#6
Quote by luxeion
but every time i try, my hand automatically repeats the up and down runs, so i force my head to stop it, hit an akward note, then silence.... i mean, some people use less notes, like 4 notes only and they can get pretty creative with it, and what they play is really easy to play so that isn't the issue.... but what i wonder is... how can u come up with great ideas like that?? :O.. i realize that is doesn't matter how fast u play or slow, if u hit real good notes, it can be very beautiful..

Good improv skills come from being able to transfer the melody in your mind to the guitar. That's the trick to improv.

One thing I find useful is to listen to a backing track and then record myself humming over that backing track. Then I take my guitar and I try to learn the melody I was humming. After a while (weeks and months, not hours and days), you start to be able to skip the humming phase and start playing a melody.

Another thing that helps a lot is to learn to listen to the chord progression. Listen to your backing track a little bit first and try to get a feel for where the tense chords are, where the exciting bits are, where there seems to be room for some speedy bits and where you should try to hold back and use a slower melodic line instead. You can't go full bore all the time; otherwise, you cheapen the effect that speedy passages have on the listener. By the same token, you can't just play slow melodies all the time and expect people to think you're cool and holding back. You have to be able to mix things up on the listener and time intervals are an important aspect of this.

Finally, don't throw in "wrong" notes just for the sake of doing it. If you're gonna throw in accidentals, use them as a means of creating tension before a big chord shift. Like I said with speed, don't use them constantly or else you'll cheapen their effect.
#7
One technique you can use is to steal simple phrases from tracks you like. These can be either from other guitarists or any instrument, including vocals. Treat these phrases as a bank you can call on to improvise. After a while they just become your vocabulary and you even forget where you got them from in the first place.

If your improvisation sounds boring to you, try using the same notes but change the rhythm in which you play them. Change lengths of the notes and add triplets or play off the beat to make it sound more interesting.
#8
slashiepie - yup it is difficult.

metalmaster- yeap i guess this is where more creative people will begin to stand out, i currently feel no ounce of creativity in me, D:, i wonder if that could be trained..

Lordpino - i tried it. it sounds much better than my automated runs! Thanks, stupid of me to rush in. Love you!!

Geldin- nice idea, i shall try it. . I'm just so used to the piano, where all the keys are right before you..and you just press your feelings out )

tim - i tried to do that, but then i ended up using those repeatedly, as is.. hmm,
#9
Most people try to use too many notes without knowing how they fit in the progresion. Start out slow and figure out which notes sound good over each chord.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3