#1
saw the ads for the new line of ernie ball cobalt strings, not sure when theyre released, but they have a more punchy gritty sound apparently and have a significantly higher output compared to nickel and steel plated strings.
#2
Quote by JJlespaul
have a significantly higher output compared to nickel and steel plated strings.

#3
Quote by Sputnik1


I take it you disagree?

I'd say the information is coming from EB...

http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2012-ernie-ball-launches-first-ever-cobalt-alloy-guitar-and-bass-string

Pertinent part?

"A first for the string world, EB's cobalt alloy strings are designed to offer more output and better quality" (Emphasis mine.)

Thoughts?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#5
Quote by Sputnik1
How does the string create more output? Please someone tell me!


I dunno, unless they have some magnetism themselves that increases the field? (Guessing, haven't a clue here...)

I'm awaiting the details...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
They decided since active pickups work so well, they would release guitar strings that are also hooked up to 9 volt batteries.
#7
Quote by Sputnik1
How does the string create more output? Please someone tell me!


i can think of a few ways people could make this claim, but most likely it probably has something to do with output in frequencies your ear is more sensitive to.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#8
Quote by lemurflames
They decided since active pickups work so well, they would release guitar strings that are also hooked up to 9 volt batteries.


This....its a scientificological/technifilical fact. Not only will the strings have more output but your playing will be as fast as lightning!
#9
Quote by gumbilicious
i can think of a few ways people could make this claim, but most likely it probably has something to do with output in frequencies your ear is more sensitive to.

The only thing I can think of is that Cobalt is more affected by magnets than Nickel.
#10
Quote by Sputnik1
The only thing I can think of is that Cobalt is more affected by magnets than Nickel.


i was thinking that too, but then i wasn't so sure. i believe that the voltage of an electrical signal represents the 'volume' or 'loudness' equivalent of an audio signal. that would mean the string would need to vibrate a longer distance (a larger throw, or travel when vibrating) in order to up the voltage. a more electromagnetically active material (like maybe a cobalt alloy) with the same vibrational throw as a 'normal string' should just provide more current and not more voltage and therefore not sound louder.

i am unsure though, cuz i am no electrical engineer and i am unsure if this thought process is valid.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#11
No idea how any of this would work, but provided they aren't $50 a pack, might be something worth picking up once it comes out.
*insert witty statement here*
#13
i am in no way knowledgeable about magnetics at all, but the figures from them are stainless steel: .13db nickel: .11db and cobalt .9db, (this for output) speaks for itself haha
#14
Quote by Sputnik1
How does the string create more output? Please someone tell me!


Probably cause when they are magnetized and move, they cause more magnetic flux to go through the coils of the pickup, causing more current.

Its quite possible. Thicker strings cause more output as well for the exact same reason.