#1
So I just wrote Hendrix type tune... The chord progression so far just cycles through an A maj, G maj, F maj, back to G maj, and "resolving" back to A maj... So what key am I in? (still new to songwriting/theory, sorry)
#2
It resolves to A major therefore the key is A major.

You wouldnt use the normal A major scale to solo over it though, as the chords are not in key so you would have to use accidentals. Try working out which sevenths each of the chords in the progression have (ie dominant 7th or major 7th), this will help you decide which notes to use to solo over it. I would geuss that the A's and G's be dominant, the F could go either way.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Jan 20, 2012,
#3
Without further context i'm fairly positive it's A minor with a subbed major for the tonic
#5
Quote by VertigodowN
If it resolves to A major, the key is A major (with accidentals)


Fixed.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#6
Quote by vampirelazarus
Fixed.


I wouldn't think the bracketed part is necessary, most music has accidentals.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Jan 20, 2012,
#7
I gonna guess A minor. Yeah I know, you're playing A major. But if you're playing A minor pentatonic over top of it, then A minor it becomes.

The disclaimer: "This is just a guess, which someone may, or may not, make me live to regret"!
#8
The key is not determined by what scale you happen to be using to solo over it.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#9
Quote by Hydra150
The key is not determined by what scale you happen to be using to solo over it.
See, I regret it, almost immediately.
#10
Quote by Captaincranky
See, I regret it, almost immediately.


Good man
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
You could take some inspiration from this song, which happens to use the same progression in a different key.

Without further context i'm fairly positive it's A minor with a subbed major for the tonic


I would agree, this is the best way to describe the key you are in.

For a solo over it, I think old reliable A minor pentatonic/blues is your best bet, subbing in A mixolydian over the A major.

The key is not determined by what scale you happen to be using to solo over it.


Really?
#12
Quote by z4twenny
Without further context i'm fairly positive it's A minor with a subbed major for the tonic

Yes, it's known as a Tierce de Picardie, or Picardy Third.

TS, key is Am. Scale is Am. Over the I chord it'll sound bluesy... which ain't a bad thing.
#13
I thought a Tierce de Picardie was when the final minor chord in the song was replaced with its major counterpart, not when thery occurene of the chord is major.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#14
It's not a picardy. Picardy generally only refers to the end of a piece or section. It's also not a subbed tonic, because that doesn't really make any sense. If you sub the tonic, it's a different tonic. If it resolves to A major it's in A major, and those G and F major chords are borrowed from the parallel minor. That makes far more sense than saying it's in A minor, but the tonic is borrowed. I don't care what scale you use, but it's in A major.
#15
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It's not a picardy. Picardy generally only refers to the end of a piece or section. It's also not a subbed tonic, because that doesn't really make any sense. If you sub the tonic, it's a different tonic. If it resolves to A major it's in A major, and those G and F major chords are borrowed from the parallel minor. That makes far more sense than saying it's in A minor, but the tonic is borrowed. I don't care what scale you use, but it's in A major.

Why is it "more rational" that the f and g are borrowed and the a major ism't subbed?
#16
Because the tonic is king. Everything in tonality if understood in relation to the tonic. Everything serves to confirm the tonic, either by directly doing so or contrasting it (like tonicizing another note in a key) and if you change the tonic, all relationships change as well. It doesn't make sense to say that the tonic chord is A minor, when everything time you confirm the tonic you confirm A major.

It's kind of like saying that you flatten the root of a chord (like in a Neapolitan) . It's not really a flattened root, it's a new root.
#17
Hi All

I've been playing for about 2 years on and off. Really trying to get it together though.

I have a question - If i'm on capo 3 and the root chord is E. What Key of harmonica can I use?
#18
Quote by Hydra150
I wouldn't think the bracketed part is necessary, most music has accidentals.


You would think so, wouldnt you? But some people wouldnt understand if I didnt....

People disappoint me....
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#19
Quote by MJukes
Hi All

I've been playing for about 2 years on and off. Really trying to get it together though.

I have a question - If i'm on capo 3 and the root chord is E. What Key of harmonica can I use?


G
#20
Quote by mrbabo91
G


G for G major or E minor

And use a C harmonica for a bluesy sound.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#21
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It's not a picardy. Picardy generally only refers to the end of a piece or section.

Because the tonic is king. Everything in tonality if understood in relation to the tonic. Everything serves to confirm the tonic, either by directly doing so or contrasting it (like tonicizing another note in a key) and if you change the tonic, all relationships change as well


Fair play, dude. Thanks for the correction, needed to do a bit of reading up, and apologies to TS if I mislead you in terms of what "key" the progression is in.

But TS, re. scales, you do have the option of both major and minor.