#1
Does anybody get stage fright while they're recording? I don't get stage fright on stage, and I can play in front of any number of people (that I've encountered in an audience so far) and have no symptoms of nervousness or apprehension.

As soon as I sit down by myself to record by myself something that I wrote by myself, my playing gets really sloppy and I forget how to play bits of the song, play the wrong sections of the song at the wrong time, etc.

If I try to do a simple video in front of a camera (once again, set up by myself) the same thing happens.

I would imagine that if I paid for studio time this feeling would be tenfold.


Does anybody else suffer from recording fright?

EDIT: Had to fix some typos. I'm drunk so I'm sure there's more to be revealed.
Last edited by Butt Rayge at Jan 21, 2012,
#2
I've noticed I just get a lot more pedantic when I record. When I'm just jamming, mistakes happen, no biggie.
When I'm playing in front of people I'm too busy thinking 3 seconds ahead to notice what I'm playing at the time.
When I'm recording, the slightest half-dead note throws me right off and I rage.
#3
It's more a sense of oh shit oh shit oh shit don't screw up don't screw up.
#5
I can't do vocals when recording. There's something about people hearing my vocals with no music behind it. Euuurrrgghh.

Edit: I'm going to a studio in Glasgow for a week, 14 days from now. I'm laying down the drums and I know it's going to take ages to get them right. I'm a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to that.
Last edited by whoomit at Jan 21, 2012,
#6
i find playing into a DI easier than playing into an amp which is fully rigged up, me wearing headphones wires draped everywhere and everyone looking at you through a window.
if i'm playing something on keyboard to put in logic for whatever assignment i have this week, i can play it - until i press record. everything goes to shit, so much so that other people have to press record for me.
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#7
I always get nervous on stage, but whenever I'm trying to play something I wrote or when recording something, I play at my best. No stage fright in MAH HAUS !
#8
Part of my problem might be that I don't practice my own songs enough compared to what I play live. I must subconsciously say 'I wrote the ****ers, why should I have to practice them?' and then play sloppily as a result of not properly knowing how to play them.

Still doesn't explain the nervousness, though.
#9
I get this a lot...not sure why...I mean you wrote that riff/chord progression/whatever and when a camera or a record button shows up you suddenly feel like you didn't make that riff or something.

Incredibly frustrating sometimes.
#10
i get that. its because when you're recording you typically want things to sound as close to perfect as you can get. crap in, crap out as they say. and for me, when i really start concentrating on what I'm playing i notice how many little inconsistencies there are in my playing which makes it really frustrating trying to get that perfect take.
its not like playing live where you can just brush off a little mistake because its so loud that no one noticed. thank god for comping
#11
Sounds like a problem a friend of mine had when he got his $5000 tube amp.

Every tiny mistake could be heard a mile away.

He had to go back to the basics and practice slowly, even the things he thought he knew perfectly. Too bad he didn't do this right from the start like I told him to and spend a little less time with distortion, as well.
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#12
Quote by So-Cal
It's more a sense of oh shit oh shit oh shit don't screw up don't screw up.


This. Happens to me on stage as well.
"You're not hardcore unless you live hardcore"
#14
Red light fever...

I get it so badly. At a live gig it's not such a big deal if you screw up because, unless its being recorded, no one's going to hear it again. If you screw up on tape (even though you can just play it again) it'll be there to listen to over and over again...
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#15
No, I don't see why. I wrote it, I play it, I'm baddass, the song is badass, everything about this is badass. Lets make a ****ing record!

But I love being in the studio so much it practically gives me wood so
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#17
The thing with recording is you can have as many attempts as you like. Of course, mistakes are more easily noticed than playing a song live, and as a song gets longer, it seems like the chance of playing it perfectly approaches zero. I think for me it's more to do with getting rather pissed off as I **** up the last ****ing bit of attempt 182, but I usually end up with something satisfactory...
#18
I don't know if it's being nervous, or just that when you record yourself with no audience, or background noise you can just hear every tiny mistake you could make. I think it was Ritchie Blackmore that said "When you're in the studio, that's when you realize how good or bad you are. You can't hide from the recording." Mind you, he was talking about being a studio player in the 1960's, but I still think the point stands.
#19
All the time. No matter how well I master something, I will ALWAYS **** something up when recording. I can't help it.
#22
i got a little nervous last time cause i kept screwing up when i first started, but our drummer was ****ing awful and left before he even laid down one decent track.
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#23
Quote by So-Cal
It's more a sense of oh shit oh shit oh shit don't screw up don't screw up.

But that feeling has the same symptoms of nervousness for me, so to me 'oh shit oh shit, don't screw up' = recording/stage fright.

Quote by SkeanAR
The thing with recording is you can have as many attempts as you like. Of course, mistakes are more easily noticed than playing a song live, and as a song gets longer, it seems like the chance of playing it perfectly approaches zero. I think for me it's more to do with getting rather pissed off as I **** up the last ****ing bit of attempt 182, but I usually end up with something satisfactory...

Depending on how you're recording you can do retakes of the hard bits and pick the best one. Even with that knowledge, though, I still get the nerves.
#24
i never considered it really nerve racking or anything. i remember i started out using a crappy radio shack tape deck to record a guitar track then i'd jam over it. by the time i started actually recording it wasn't a biggy. i guess the biggest thing is to pay attention to your playing but just not worry about it. normally i'll take and jam the different sections repeatedly, like i'll play the chorus over and over and over and over in multiplies of 4 then i'll go back and pick out the best takes and cut/paste them together. if you're doing it all at home, don't sweat it just have fun with it.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jan 21, 2012,
#25
I don't get nervous, but I don't really like doing it so I always end up procrastinating, sometimes for several weeks.
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