#1
Could I connect this head
http://www.orangeamps.com/terror-bass-500/
into this cabinet
http://www.thomann.de/gb/warwick_wca_410_4.htm (that cabinet has also an 8 ohm version).

I've heard that you can connect a head into a cabinet with lower power rating than the head.
Gear:

Sandberg California TM5
Jackson C20J
EBS MultiComp
Boss ODB-3
MXR El Grande Bass Fuzz
Warwick Blue Cab 30.1 (home)
Laney RB9 and Laney RB 410
Dunlop Big Stubby 2mm
Levy's Strap
Cordial cables (Roadline, Silent, Encore)
#2
Long story short, no. Save up and buy a higher rated cab. You will be fine at lower volumes, but the cab won't be able to handle it if it gets loud. You can do it the other way though, and use a head with a higher rated cab.
#3
It would be fine. Just because the output of a head is 500W, doesn't mean it will give out 500W all the time.

And with an SPL of 102, it'll be loud enough that you won't need to turn it up too loud.
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#4
Thats what I thought and will do.
Gear:

Sandberg California TM5
Jackson C20J
EBS MultiComp
Boss ODB-3
MXR El Grande Bass Fuzz
Warwick Blue Cab 30.1 (home)
Laney RB9 and Laney RB 410
Dunlop Big Stubby 2mm
Levy's Strap
Cordial cables (Roadline, Silent, Encore)
#5
I wouldnt risk it with that 4 ohm cab, if it was an 8 ohm cab you'd be fine because the amp only puts out 500 watts at 4 ohms so the out-put would be lower if you used an 8 ohm load.
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Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
Quote by Nutter_101
It would be fine. Just because the output of a head is 500W, doesn't mean it will give out 500W all the time.

And with an SPL of 102, it'll be loud enough that you won't need to turn it up too loud.


While this is true, I would never risk it. It's just not worth it.
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#7
While the debate rages on, I do want to point out there is an excellent explanation of this whole matching head to cab process in the FAQ, wherein one of our formerly esteemed mods goes into great detail on the subject.

Just saying.
#8
From Wikipedia on "Watts" - "Chuck McGregor recommended a rule of thumb in which the amplifier's maximum power output rating was twice the loudspeaker's continuous (so-called "RMS") rating, give or take 20%. In his example, a loudspeaker with a continuous power rating of 250 watts would be well-matched by an amplifier with a maximum power output within the range of 400 to 625 watts."

Watts work like this:

Volts * Amps = Watts. Voltage is constant, 110 or 120 or 220 depending on where you are. Amps vary.

So Amps vary (not amplifiers, but Amps, a physical property..) and they vary in two ways that are important for your gear:

RMS - average wattage, which is how big a light bulb you could theoretically light up with it.

The reason I compare it to a light bulb is it has a lot to do with HEAT, and how much of it your coil (the copper in your speaker cone) can handle. The max RMS voltage is very important because it determines how much wattage you can drive your speakers with before they turn into a toaster, or a light bulb, and fry.

..at that point you smell a distinctive hot, smoky odor and SILENTLY your speakers die.

*sniff* *sniff* "What's that smell?" :-o

Then there is Peak wattage, which is the wattage on your amplifier. The RMS (or Root Mean Square) wattage is a mathematical relationship to peak wattage, and this depends on the signal.

A compressed signal will have a higher RMS than an uncompressed signal assuming the peak wattage is the same.

Peak wattage is honestly not that important, but one thing you do need to consider is the mechanical displacement limit of your cone. If you send the cone far enough forward the paper can tear or it can become dislodged from the magnet that drives it. It can change shapes and get mechanically damaged by one single peak.

It can also completely blow up on you, in which case you will hear a loud, "POP!" and you will know for sure your speaker is blown.

You may or may not also smell the electric burn smell because you may or may not have toasted your coil.

A coil is not unlike a toaster or a light bulb in that it's a length of wire that completes a circuit. The electricity, and the metal in the coil doesn't know that it's supposed to be a speaker. At a certain point it says, "Oh, okay, I'm a toaster!" and faithfully produces red-hot heat to make crispy, yummy toast for you...

And your speakers die.
#9
You don't need to go as far as Wikipedia the information is all available on UG. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/gear_maintenance/matching_speakers_to_amps.html Hope this is useful.

Essentially three things break speakers:
too much heat
over excursion
wear and tear.

The power rating of your speaker is about how much heat it can take before the voice coil is damaged. It is very conservative because music has loud and quiet bits so the speaker is never treated as harshly in life as it is in the tests, it cools down in the quiet bits. Even so it can get hot enough to fry an egg!
Over excursion is down to bass, and you play??!!! Most bass speakers can't handle a lot of deep bass and so if you play deep and use a lot of distortion and boost the bass eq your 200W speaker might only handle 30W. You'll hear this happening though. If the speaker starts distorting (do Finns say farting?) you turn it down
Wear and tear account for most speakers in the end and if you push them hard it shortens their lives. You'll double the wear rate for every 10 degree rise and also the more it moves the faster it wears.

There isn't a simple answer and if Wiki says double the amp power then it is misleading to the point of being wrong. That will avoid amp distortion at the expense of a shortened speaker life and possible/probable bass compression as the coil leaves the magnet. Roughly even is a good compromise and twice the speaker handling isn't unreasonable if you want to get the maximum life out of the speaker