#1
I'm having trouble with my stratocaster. When I bend the E string, around 14 and 15th fret, the tone gets " chocked ". I've seen this on other strats too ... I hope it's not a serious problem ? I guess it has to do with dry air, because of the winter ... even tho I use a air moisturizer, but not when I sleep, cuz it makes some noise.

I would REALLY appreciate if someone could give me tips of what to do, been trying to search the internet but cannot find anything. Hope it's not a big problem :/

thanks!
#2
Do you mean that you ''fret out''? If so what strat do you have and what fretboard radius?
#3
What do you mean by the term chocked? If chocked means muddy than the only solution I can think of is getting better pickups; i'm assuming you have stock single p/u's.

It's the same thing with Gain that low on a strat. The strat just isn't the best instrument when it comes to gain.
Quote by Pagan_Poetry
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#4
Quote by Joenuh
Do you mean that you ''fret out''? If so what strat do you have and what fretboard radius?


Yeah, that would be it! I have a 2010 American standard strat. I Don't have the fretboard radius in my head right now, sorry ...
#5
Quote by mystical_1
What do you mean by the term chocked? If chocked means muddy than the only solution I can think of is getting better pickups; i'm assuming you have stock single p/u's.

It's the same thing with Gain that low on a strat. The strat just isn't the best instrument when it comes to gain.


The tone dissapears, it was called " fret out "
#6
I have the same guitar but what do you mean by chocked? Wiki defines chocked as something wedged or full.

Edit: The tone dies out no matter which p/u you pick over?
Quote by Pagan_Poetry
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Last edited by mystical_1 at Jan 21, 2012,
#7
If it really is fretting out you can also hear it without playing through an amp. The fretboard radius on a american standard is 9.5 so that shouldn't really give you problems. The cause could be that the truss-rod is not adjusted right. The cause of you having to adjust the truss-rod could be the enviromental climate. Can you give it a set-up yourself, if not take it to a guitar tech.
#8
Quote by mystical_1
I have the same guitar but what do you mean by chocked? Wiki defines chocked as something wedged or full.

Edit: The tone dies out no matter which p/u you pick over?


When I bend the E string, 14th and 15th fret, the tone dies, yes. Dont really know how to explain it, but I think im talking about " fret out "
#10
It sounds like a high 16th fret to me, not a truss rod issue.

You can fix it temporarily by raising your bridge saddles, but have that fret checked out.
#11
Quote by mystical_1
What do you mean by the term chocked? If chocked means muddy than the only solution I can think of is getting better pickups; i'm assuming you have stock single p/u's.

It's the same thing with Gain that low on a strat. The strat just isn't the best instrument when it comes to gain.


strat not good with gain? please share whatever drugs you are on. strats do fine at all gain levels so i don't know what you are talking about.

OP you may have a dead spot on your neck or a bad fret. has your guitar been set up lately? if you do have a 7.25" neck radius (found on most pre 1986 fenders and some reissues) then they are prone to fretout.
#12
Check to see if your neck if generally straight before even THINKING of touching the truss rod. A 9.5" radius is kind of round for a neck, as most guitars now have about a 12" radius, so your action can't be as low with a rounder neck because the curvature of the neck gets in the way causing you to fret out. The first time I set up my Tele on the day I got it, I played with the saddle to get it as low as possible without fretting out, and my neck's relief was perfect as I had already set it. So just play with your E string saddle by raising it until the fretting out stops.

Note: You may need to adjust intonation after raising/lowering saddles. If you need a truss rod adjustment, you will definately need to adjust/check your intonation.
#14
Quote by al112987
It sounds like a high 16th fret to me, not a truss rod issue.

You can fix it temporarily by raising your bridge saddles, but have that fret checked out.


+1

9.5" radius shouldn't really be fretting out. and just being at one fret suggests a dodgy fret.
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#15
Yep, people on this site are so quick to suggest "adjust the truss rod," and yet do not ever seem to stop to think about what adjusting the truss rod actually does.

The root cause of the vast majority of buzzing and fretting out issues are due to fretwork. Truss rod and bridge height are just ways to get around the buzzing without touching the frets. Even my 7.25" radius strat does not fret out on bends with low action because the frets are dead level.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 21, 2012,